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KellyCraig

Kelly Craig
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29Instructables146,346Views365CommentsDesert Aire, Eastern Washington

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Build a Tool Contest 2017
Contest Winner Second Prize in the Build a Tool Contest 2017
  • Pressure Cooker Vacuum Chamber

    Occasionally, logs are hard to grasp using the stock, flat ends. Especially if the log is not cut 90 degrees to it's length.I was thinking of tweaking the clamp ends to give them more bite. Haven't decided if that will be via drilling three holes, 120 degrees apart, and then pressing nail ends or something else into them. Alternately, I might do some welds then grind them to look like a lathe drive center.

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  • Super Simple Band Saw Log Sled

    Thanks for posting the picture (Bessy clamp?).Glad this worked for you. Just used mine last week to run some cherry from one of the local orchards. My Rikon was thumping, even after several new blade swaps, so a few thick, short logs made for a good test material, after about a hundred tweaks (give or take fifty) of the lower wheel shaft.

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  • KellyCraig commented on Gammawave's instructable Barometric Mason Jar
    Barometric Mason Jar

    Short, sweet, simple, educational AND quite useful. Nice job, all the way around.

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  • Scratch-built CNC Router

    I've been eyeing CNC routers and lasers for nearly fifty years. Initially, getting one would have required talking the neighbor into letting me mortgage his house, along with mine and a couple others. CNC's have come a long way, as far as being within reach of hobby woodworkers, capability and practicability. Still, a decent commercial one isn't cheap, so I pondered building one too.The few consumer made CNC's I've read about were rather limited for my wants (I have a Radio Carver with a 4'x6' bed, so can make signs). Yours, I find inspiring. More so because you shared the details of problems you ran into and solved. Some of the electronics ones I recognized from my days of working for the Fed. They were common and we solved them same way you describe, or with shielded wire, for example.…

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    I've been eyeing CNC routers and lasers for nearly fifty years. Initially, getting one would have required talking the neighbor into letting me mortgage his house, along with mine and a couple others. CNC's have come a long way, as far as being within reach of hobby woodworkers, capability and practicability. Still, a decent commercial one isn't cheap, so I pondered building one too.The few consumer made CNC's I've read about were rather limited for my wants (I have a Radio Carver with a 4'x6' bed, so can make signs). Yours, I find inspiring. More so because you shared the details of problems you ran into and solved. Some of the electronics ones I recognized from my days of working for the Fed. They were common and we solved them same way you describe, or with shielded wire, for example.So, THANKS much for your efforts.

    Routers and CNC spindles are notorious dust and chip generators. My routers are the one tool in my shop that make the biggest mess of it. That said, I note the following exceptions:(1) My router table, which has dust collection at the fence and at the router cover under the table, may only leave a tablespoon of dust on the top, even though the work might result in filling a five gallon can with dust and chips.(2) Occasionally, I am able to use my sanding station for router work, including long boards I am able to fit through the sides or back. Because it has two sides, a back and a top (nylon cloth) around a down draft table, all the air drawn in by the dust collector comes from the front, so nearly all the dust and most of the chips are captured in the station.(3) I am able to position…

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    Routers and CNC spindles are notorious dust and chip generators. My routers are the one tool in my shop that make the biggest mess of it. That said, I note the following exceptions:(1) My router table, which has dust collection at the fence and at the router cover under the table, may only leave a tablespoon of dust on the top, even though the work might result in filling a five gallon can with dust and chips.(2) Occasionally, I am able to use my sanding station for router work, including long boards I am able to fit through the sides or back. Because it has two sides, a back and a top (nylon cloth) around a down draft table, all the air drawn in by the dust collector comes from the front, so nearly all the dust and most of the chips are captured in the station.(3) I am able to position a 4" dust collection hose near the trim router my Radio Carver uses to duplicate items off templates or other items like violins, gun stocks and so on.Each of the above tie to one of my 3 horse, "four bag" dust collectors. Obviously, the combination does a wonderful job. Since moving a four inch hose around a table would put a lot of load on the stepper motors, I wonder if an alternative would be using the approach I did for my sanding station. That would mean building a "box" around the CNC just tall enough to allow the moving head to clear. It could be as simple to make as using 4 mil, clear plastic (versus the heavy nylon I use for my sanding station). Collector to ports at the bottom, near the work area would reduce dust problems greatly and may even contribute to system cooling.

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  • I still have one. We used these to twist wire pairs before installing them in protective hosing.Clamp it on the wires, lock it and run it.

    We called them by every name under the sun, weight pliers, things, etc. They are used for pounding balancing weights on a car rim, and for removing them.

    Another copper pipe cutter.

    Nose hair trimmer. Usually used by people with the plague and any one who touches one, after it's used, is, probably, doomed. [Snort, okay, only the first sentence might be true.]

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  • Large DIY Vibratory Tumbler

    Would love to see a before and after photo of what you tumbled with this.Nice job. Nice in fact and deed.

    Must have been a cup of coffee short of awake when I went through your ible (don't know how I missed that video).Thanks. After watching it, your build is all the more impressive. It'd be fun to see what finer media would do with something. Perhaps even sand, though one would want to control the silica dust issue with such things.In time, I assume the media would take a toll on the container, just as cleaning metal parts in a sonic cleaner does.Since you vibrate mechanically, it would seem even using silicone caulk to hold metal panels over the surfaces of the tub may not pose too much of a dampening problem.

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  • DIY Textured Cement-Styrofoam Planter

    Curious about examples of the differences in weight (straight concrete vs concrete with 50% Styrofoam). Any ideas?Regardless, looks like a fun project with a lot of possibilities, including he towel type planters seen elsewhere.Too, it'd be interesting to see how treating the finished concrete with waterglass (sodium silicate) would affect durability, since it's said to react with the cement and make it more durability. Of course, there are other, commercial concrete treatments (as you suggest) that would protect this investment in time.Good ible, by the way.

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  • Recycled Cork Backsplash

    You can run a tape to the wall and make a mark at ten (10) inches. Then measure over from the other wall to that mark, then add the ten inches to that reading.An alternate method, which I use often, is using a measuring gauge. A gauge can be made, for example, using two or more pieces of thin scrap wood (like aluminum or wood yard sticks) and some hot glue or other means of securing them together, like duct tape.Think of them in terms of being end to end on the wall, but overlapping each other, so the glue or tape has enough material to hold the pieces where you placed them. Do this until they cover wall to wall. You should do this at the top and bottom, because walls are almost never square.For each measurment, move the measuring tool to your wood and make the appropriate marks.Because …

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    You can run a tape to the wall and make a mark at ten (10) inches. Then measure over from the other wall to that mark, then add the ten inches to that reading.An alternate method, which I use often, is using a measuring gauge. A gauge can be made, for example, using two or more pieces of thin scrap wood (like aluminum or wood yard sticks) and some hot glue or other means of securing them together, like duct tape.Think of them in terms of being end to end on the wall, but overlapping each other, so the glue or tape has enough material to hold the pieces where you placed them. Do this until they cover wall to wall. You should do this at the top and bottom, because walls are almost never square.For each measurment, move the measuring tool to your wood and make the appropriate marks.Because walls are rarely plumb, and if you aren't gong to frame your project, you would do well to set a try or L square on the wall you're working and not if there is a gap at the top or bottom. You would measure the gap and add it to your plan. For example, if you measure the left wall and note a 1/8" gap at the bottom, you would move your top mark to the right 1/8".In a pinch, a belt sander is a perfect, though messy tool for scribbing to a line when working counter tops.

    IF you know someone with a bandsaw, you can cut a hundred corks, safely, in about twenty minutes or less. I wrote and instructable on it and it's posted here:https://www.instructables.com/Cutting-Wine-Bott...Nice job, on the instructable and the project.

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  • Pressure Cooker Vacuum Chamber

    That has some potential and would solve the problem of the plastic being crazed by the stabilizing gases.

    I'm with those who say it shouldn't matter that a drill press is used for woodworking. With rare exceptions, any drill press you run across was designed for metal working. One exception I know of is a Powermatic unit, but the design changes are only to make it more handy for woodworking projects. Mechanically, even it would not be affected by being used for metal work all day long.The worst that would happen would be, you forgot to change the speed, or you might have forgotten to clean off all the metal debris.

    Many chambers have the gauges and such mounted in the sides, so they don't have to drill the glass tops.First, unlike plastics, the glass will not fracture, when subjected to certain off gasses, such as the gas of Cactus Juice used for stabilizing wood.As to the location of the holes for gauges, it shouldn't matter, IF you put the product in another container, which you should be doing to avoid an insane cleanup project.

    Just went on a search for better solutions that a chunk of plastic for the lid sparked by the suggestion of a cake dome. The rabbit trails let to glass lazy Susans, MICROWAVE TURNTABLES....Of course, you can just search for, for example, "15" round tempered glass plate."

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  • For those who got this far, there is quite a difference between freeze dried food and food that is just dehydrated. The former can be like candy and is, to those who have tried the product of both, the superior product.

    It is said the Aztecs were the first to freeze dry food when they figured out they could carry their food up into the mountains where the freezing temps, lower humidity and reduced air pressure would do the work naturally.

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  • Decades back we used to do this using powdered soap. We would place the flowers in the soap and, gently, fill in around it. It would draw the moisture out without removing the color.

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  • Pimp Your Vacuum Sealer

    P.S. Thanks for the liquid tip to keep the vacuum pump safe.Hmm. This sparks all kinds of ideas for vacuum dehydrating.....

    For those who fall victim to experimentation, consider picking up nebulizers when you find them at garage sales. The old ones could be converted from compressors to vacuum pumps by pulling the cover and swapping the hose to the input side of the compressor.I used one in conjunction with one of the variable temp sealers, to allow me to seal other than just proprietary bags. I've, also, had a lot of success using a household vacuum.I made a over sized food saver type vacuum chamber using scraps of Corian. The first layer was a solid, rectangular piece long enough to take on the biggest bags. It was ABOUT 4" x 16". Above the first piece and welded to it was a similar piece, but which had I had cut the center out of, leaving ABOUT 1/2" of the border. I used common, foam do…

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    For those who fall victim to experimentation, consider picking up nebulizers when you find them at garage sales. The old ones could be converted from compressors to vacuum pumps by pulling the cover and swapping the hose to the input side of the compressor.I used one in conjunction with one of the variable temp sealers, to allow me to seal other than just proprietary bags. I've, also, had a lot of success using a household vacuum.I made a over sized food saver type vacuum chamber using scraps of Corian. The first layer was a solid, rectangular piece long enough to take on the biggest bags. It was ABOUT 4" x 16". Above the first piece and welded to it was a similar piece, but which had I had cut the center out of, leaving ABOUT 1/2" of the border. I used common, foam door gasket around the cut out, to get a seal.A third piece served as a lid, with hinges. I used 1/2" thick poly, because I had it, but more Corian would do.A hole into the cut out [center] piece allowed me to plug the vacuum hose in.

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  • How to Make a Vacuum Chamber

    I don't have an end mill, but do have an over-arm-pin-router. Like an end mill, it carves from the top, but has no problem with plunge cutting.If the item being cut were on a lazy Susan and the router were supported over the project, like a pin router, a groove could be carved into the poly using a router and just spinning the acrylic.Alternately, a center pin hole would allow one to spin the poly so a table mounted router accomplished the same thing.Finally, and the easiest for most would be to just make a new router base that extended, say, twelve inches. Once the router was mounted, you would only need to measure from where the bit lands to the other end for the center pivot, then using that center pilot hole, you could spin the router to cut a circular groove.

    P.S. Thanks for the ible, and for reminding us we can get out of the box to solve a problem, build a VERY handy tool and save money doing it.

    I used to make coffee tables that required oval, rectangular and other shapes. I would have the glass company cut the shapes for me based off templates I made for them. It's not as expensive as one might think and, of course, the glass will not be prone to cracking or crazing in reaction to the off gas of things like Cactus Juice used for stabilizing wood.A peek at many stabilizing systems reveals some companies punch holes near the top of the can to install gauges and air ports, but the glass company may be able to drill holes in your glass to give you an alternative.

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  • There you have it, people searching for information on a topic will end up at both old and new and old page posts. If the information is good, fine. But if the information is erroneous, even if years after the initial post, it is good that people take time to get the facts out. The same applies if there are other solutions that can help people better or more easily do the project.

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  • Laminate Mixed Media Bangle

    I have tons of wood and few hundred pounds of acrylics. I've been laminating the plastics between pieces of walnut, koa, mahogany, acacia, sycamore and cherry or apple. The results are great looking, but the occasional drop or high temps the item suffers being stored in my non-climate controlled storage has resulted in numerous separations.I've used both my 1:1 and 2:1 epoxies and commercial "Super glue." Laminations with the latter actually seem a bit more reliable.I've even gone so far as to sand with 60 grit and grind the clear acrylics for better grip, since the epoxies fill well and dry clear. Even that does not guarantee a dependable joint.I am going to look into the West system. In the end, it seems the best bet would be something which, like the cyro glues, softens and …

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    I have tons of wood and few hundred pounds of acrylics. I've been laminating the plastics between pieces of walnut, koa, mahogany, acacia, sycamore and cherry or apple. The results are great looking, but the occasional drop or high temps the item suffers being stored in my non-climate controlled storage has resulted in numerous separations.I've used both my 1:1 and 2:1 epoxies and commercial "Super glue." Laminations with the latter actually seem a bit more reliable.I've even gone so far as to sand with 60 grit and grind the clear acrylics for better grip, since the epoxies fill well and dry clear. Even that does not guarantee a dependable joint.I am going to look into the West system. In the end, it seems the best bet would be something which, like the cyro glues, softens and locks into the surface of the plastic would be the best bet.Have you experimented with any other glues?

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  • Wooden Cream Cheese Knife

    I've made several butter knives and such, but not like this. You can be sure I'm stealing this idea.NICE JOB, both on the project and the Instructable.

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  • End Grain Cutting Boards From Scrap Wood How-To

    Now, about using a planer for cleaning up end grain - DON'T.As has been said by several professionals, just because you got away with it a few times does not mean you always will.When a planer gets into a fight with the end grain, it can go really bad. The wood can, literally, explode. When it does, it can destroy the planer, obviously the project and can even injure the operator.Even though my spiral cutting heads to a remarkable jog of figured wood with wild wood grain, it's still a debatable match for something that is all end grain.If you doubt the danger of running end grain through a planer, do a simple Net search using words like "planer end grain explosion."

    Vegetable oil, certainly, does go rancid. Note that no pro uses it for kitchen utensils or boards.Walnut oil is a hardening oil. It does the same thing tung or boiled linseed oil (treated flax seed oil) does. It polymerizes, so builds up over time.You want to use non-hardening oils for wooden spoons, spurtles and cutting boards. That is why every commercial product for these uses have a base of mineral oil. They might ad beeswax or even carnuba, but for things like butcher blocks, straight mineral oil is the go to oil.Many use olive oil, thinking they are taking a healthy approach, but the oil will go rancid and the wood develops a smell.

    You do not need to slather on mineral oil, wipe it off, then slather on more. It just wastes mineral oil.Apply a generous amount of oil to wood. Add more wherever it soaked in. When it quits soaking in quickly, make sure it has a good layer of oil, then walk away.If that layer soaked in when you get back to the item in an hour or so, add more and let it set for about twenty-four hours or even more. Only then do you need to wipe off the excess.You put a lot of work into the project, so what's another day?I bought an old butcher block on the cheap because it had cracks and separations from drying out over the years. I used the technique above, then walked away for a couple weeks. When I came back, the oil had all wicked in the wood. The effect of replacing the lost moisture was, the wood …

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    You do not need to slather on mineral oil, wipe it off, then slather on more. It just wastes mineral oil.Apply a generous amount of oil to wood. Add more wherever it soaked in. When it quits soaking in quickly, make sure it has a good layer of oil, then walk away.If that layer soaked in when you get back to the item in an hour or so, add more and let it set for about twenty-four hours or even more. Only then do you need to wipe off the excess.You put a lot of work into the project, so what's another day?I bought an old butcher block on the cheap because it had cracks and separations from drying out over the years. I used the technique above, then walked away for a couple weeks. When I came back, the oil had all wicked in the wood. The effect of replacing the lost moisture was, the wood swelled to its original state and all the cracks and splits disappeared.

    Too, it is a hardening oil, so it's like applying tung oil or boiled linseed oil over time. We don't want surface coats on things like this though.

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  • Wall Mounted Bike Repair Stand With Heavy Duty Clamp

    I don't even own a bike and had to check this out because is was cool. Good job.

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  • Aside the fact you answered to an answer to an eight year old post, I must, four more years in, ask, is it your stance those of us researching the topic have gotten to stale information and ideas?I see the same thing said on sites I go to elsewhere that discuss copper plating, woodwork, electronics, and so on. It appears people making such comments think answers have merit only if fresh. Why would that be?

    I do hobby copper plating and you are right - AC will not get the job done.When copper plating, we use copper for the anode (positive lead), which rests in bath of copper sulfate, sulfuric acid and distilled water [and a brightener]. The cathode (negative lead) is the item being plated. The current flows from positive to the negative, resulting in the copper coating the cathode.If we were using AC voltage, at sixty cycles, for example, the copper anode would become the cathode sixty times a second. Essentially, everything you were trying to do would be undone in the next cycle.In a copper plating bath, even though the DC current flows from the anode, if we wanted to plate an iron object USING THE ACID BATH, it would have to be sealed, then coated with a conductive paint, to which the cop…

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    I do hobby copper plating and you are right - AC will not get the job done.When copper plating, we use copper for the anode (positive lead), which rests in bath of copper sulfate, sulfuric acid and distilled water [and a brightener]. The cathode (negative lead) is the item being plated. The current flows from positive to the negative, resulting in the copper coating the cathode.If we were using AC voltage, at sixty cycles, for example, the copper anode would become the cathode sixty times a second. Essentially, everything you were trying to do would be undone in the next cycle.In a copper plating bath, even though the DC current flows from the anode, if we wanted to plate an iron object USING THE ACID BATH, it would have to be sealed, then coated with a conductive paint, to which the copper from the bath and anode would adhere.The iron reacts with the acid bath and contaminates it, even if only connected to the cathode.

    To anybody researching and looking for answers, it might be polypropylene bags of one micron or less could aid in solving the problem of disintegrating carbon rods. The problem would be getting the power into the carbon in the bag. If the bag were full enough, it may be just burying the anode in the upper section would produce results.

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  • Mini Hydrogen Generator

    Let's see, some guy whose only Instructables achievements seem to be a hundred or so troll like comments on other people's posts types "[s]illy comment," then goes on to type silly comments, before making ludicrous comments.Maybe you're playing dumb. Of course, it may be sincere. The content and context of your post only offers suggestions. That aside, you mentioned chlorine. Inasmuch as you indicate yourself to be far more knowledgeable than some or all those who come here to learn and share, you could have taken the opportunity to mention chlorine can be a result of adding salt to water during the electrolysis processes. You could have explained how those of us who do metal plating concern ourselves with what goes into the plating bath for that and other reasons. You, howeve…

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    Let's see, some guy whose only Instructables achievements seem to be a hundred or so troll like comments on other people's posts types "[s]illy comment," then goes on to type silly comments, before making ludicrous comments.Maybe you're playing dumb. Of course, it may be sincere. The content and context of your post only offers suggestions. That aside, you mentioned chlorine. Inasmuch as you indicate yourself to be far more knowledgeable than some or all those who come here to learn and share, you could have taken the opportunity to mention chlorine can be a result of adding salt to water during the electrolysis processes. You could have explained how those of us who do metal plating concern ourselves with what goes into the plating bath for that and other reasons. You, however, did not, so may not know. Since you didn't know, were so consumed with rage against those who didn't, or just have a great deal of trouble typing even a single line, I'll say it for you: Adding salt to water to which an electrical charge is applied can produce the chlorine gas you mentioned.Regarding your statement "i]f it's taken five years to get round to compose that rubbish. . . .," are you really unaware Net and Instructable searches are purposed to produce results, and those results often lead to, for example, five year old comments, like yours? If that simple fact is difficult for you to understand, do some experimentation with the search processes, or have someone explain it to you in finer detail.Of course, it's possible you attach more importance to yourself than does the rest of the world, and actually believe I or someone else would spend five years working on a response to your rambling response. Be advised, that is not the case. Until the date of my post, I and most the world knew nothing of you. It may be life was more pleasant for both of us that way.

    Merely that something is written does not make it libel. If it's factual or satirical, a legal challenge going down that road could earn CR11 (civil rules of court) sanctions for a frivolous claim.Just so you know.

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  • Killing Algae Growing on a Wooden Deck Using Hydrogen Peroxide

    We used sodium percarbonate we bought in 40# bags to clean sidewalks and such. Mixed with water it produces hydrogen peroxide and soda ash (washing soda) a mild caustic cleaner. We found it worked best with used with warm water.Just for reference, we are, essentially, talking about the contents of things like "Oxy Clean."

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  • How to Assemble a HHO Generator and Why It Works

    To those knowledgeable on these matters, just some questions to help us move past the silver carburetor, or to inspire new paths of investigation.About forty-five years ago, I had a little motorcycle that would top end on the Brewster (Washington) flats at about 75 mph on a hot summer day. Later in the day, after a short cloud burst, that bike would top at or near the 100 mph.Comes the question from the foregoing, was the cooler weather responsible for the higher speed? Was the higher humidity a contributing factor. Was it the combination>Years after those days, many of us started playing with water vapor injection systems. I'd never heard of Browns Gas or hydrogen-oxygen injection. Anyway, I had a 69 short-bed, step-side pickup with a six cylinder. My goal was to break 30 mpg. Keep…

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    To those knowledgeable on these matters, just some questions to help us move past the silver carburetor, or to inspire new paths of investigation.About forty-five years ago, I had a little motorcycle that would top end on the Brewster (Washington) flats at about 75 mph on a hot summer day. Later in the day, after a short cloud burst, that bike would top at or near the 100 mph.Comes the question from the foregoing, was the cooler weather responsible for the higher speed? Was the higher humidity a contributing factor. Was it the combination>Years after those days, many of us started playing with water vapor injection systems. I'd never heard of Browns Gas or hydrogen-oxygen injection. Anyway, I had a 69 short-bed, step-side pickup with a six cylinder. My goal was to break 30 mpg. Keep in mind, the truck had a 4:13 rear end and a 3 speed on the column. To improve mileage, I did many alterations: I swapped the stock 3 speed for a 3 speed out of a 60's Chev wagon, with over drive; I played with the cam; I installed headers; I installed an air dam; and, I played with the carburetor (e.g., minutely over size the jet to address a flat spot from the increased air flow caused by alteration of the exhaust and intake (cam). It's been so long I do not remember all the details on the vapor injection, but mine relied on vacuum and atmospheric pressure. Though the port to atmosphere was small, it was obvious vapor made it to the venturi of the single barrel carb.I believe some of the thinking, regarding vapor injection, was it worked like octane boosters, and kept the engine more clean from carbon. Keep in mind, this was around the time octanes were dropping, even as some new cars called for higher levels.The point of the above is, while a single thing, alone, may not give the effect sought, one must wonder how its interaction with other things affects performance.Of course, there are many variables to consider, such as, increased loads on alternators produce drag on the engine that will, negatively, affect mileage.Then there are the days, about eight decades back, when people used gassifiers to generate fuel to move fleets of trucks (which were far from quarter milers, but moved, nonetheless. An enterprising Pacific Northwet shingle mill owner even ran a large duct from a partially filled gas tank to a modified carb system to get his rig down the road. It was slow to get up to speed, but it got him the forty-five miles to town and back.

    Don't forget to factor in the drag on the alternator, as more load is imposed on it.

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  • Mini Hydrogen Generator

    If you're going down that road, explain the difference between using soda vs salt. Don't leave everyone hanging (wondering what you're talking about). Use your vast knowledge to give some helpful details.

    Others more learned than I am say, don't use salt. That is how you make chlorine gas. Stay with the soda.

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  • Separate Hydrogen and Oxygen From Water Through Electrolysis

    Oh sure, daddyo, next thing I know, you're going to tell me they're debating whether electricity flows positive to negative or negative to positive.I guess we better quit writing in stone. It's so hard to erase.In the end, I cannot say you or the plastic hot rod are right, or wrong. I will say it's sad nothing significant has been done with carburation in a hundred years. Throttle body are just design change and did little for performance and economy. Fuel injection, yeah, little bit.In the end, the mileage of vehicles is stupid bad. My VW square back I had in the 70's did regular thirties for mpg. Fifty years later, with all the thinking power (computing) power we have today and the best we can do is fifty with a diesel engine on a tiny car. That's beyond sad.Back around 72, my motorcycl…

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    Oh sure, daddyo, next thing I know, you're going to tell me they're debating whether electricity flows positive to negative or negative to positive.I guess we better quit writing in stone. It's so hard to erase.In the end, I cannot say you or the plastic hot rod are right, or wrong. I will say it's sad nothing significant has been done with carburation in a hundred years. Throttle body are just design change and did little for performance and economy. Fuel injection, yeah, little bit.In the end, the mileage of vehicles is stupid bad. My VW square back I had in the 70's did regular thirties for mpg. Fifty years later, with all the thinking power (computing) power we have today and the best we can do is fifty with a diesel engine on a tiny car. That's beyond sad.Back around 72, my motorcycle would do about 75 on the Brewster (Washignton) flats on a hot summer day. The same flats and motor cycle, during a light rain, would break 90 to a hundred mph.How much of the improved top end was due to cooling and how much due to water vapor on the intake, I don't know. I do know there are always many more variables to be looked at for a given matter than most presume, including the "experts."While a bit of a rabbit trail, we do know vehicles were, literally, ran off fumes in hard times. They weren't quarter milers, but they got people to and from points.

    Keep in mind, 3-M / NASA / BANGOR / PSNS / etc. engineers did not invent everything. Many an item was developed by individuals lacking credentials and in less than ideal conditions.I have no degrees. My schooling has been minimal. Still, things I studied are significant in number and breadth. Though I lacked credentials like you describe, the federal government used hundreds of my procedures and ideas to solve problems, or to improve efficiency. Engineers at Keyport, Washington, assigned me many projects and had me effect repairs to complex electronics systems. Though I never went to school for it, they even called on my to do drafting [pre-CAD] for them.Having worked with MANY engineers on many projects, I can say, with certainty, while intelligent, some can be comedy relief in other t…

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    Keep in mind, 3-M / NASA / BANGOR / PSNS / etc. engineers did not invent everything. Many an item was developed by individuals lacking credentials and in less than ideal conditions.I have no degrees. My schooling has been minimal. Still, things I studied are significant in number and breadth. Though I lacked credentials like you describe, the federal government used hundreds of my procedures and ideas to solve problems, or to improve efficiency. Engineers at Keyport, Washington, assigned me many projects and had me effect repairs to complex electronics systems. Though I never went to school for it, they even called on my to do drafting [pre-CAD] for them.Having worked with MANY engineers on many projects, I can say, with certainty, while intelligent, some can be comedy relief in other than their SPECIFIC area of expertise. As well, I can say, with no uncertainty, outright dismissing someone because they have not been recognized by some school can be a fool's errand.Those things aside, and regarding your responses, are you factoring in the changes in the efficiency of rapid oxidation (firing) of fuel when changes are made to it or things added to it, such as we see when octane levels are changed? What would happen if a minute amount of water vapor was introduced, as might apply to my description of the performance of my motorcycle, and when hydrogen and oxygen re-combine?What could we see if just oxygen was introduced to fuel (as suggested elsewhere)? We know a simple cigar can be made into a cutting torch using pure oxygen. Again, what, when we introduce hydrogen and oxygen.Perhaps, rather than getting insulted, and insulting. we'd be more valuable, both to ourselves and others, if we shared ideas to help others avoid known pitfalls, or what have you.

    I was just considering making a simple generator. Long ago, I had contemplated using an aquarium with a plate across the middle to separate the sides, with a gap at the bottom.An aquarium would take a lot of room when my shop is already filled with everything from plating stations to over-arm pin routers and dust collectors. This morning it flashed through my mind the same effect could be done using a gallon jar and a smaller quart jar, or a PVC pipe, either which would fit in the gallon jar, have the bottoms open, be submerged in water, and have lids with holes through which exhaust/collection pipes would protrude and through which the anode and cathode could be submerged.

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  • Tyre Bowl- Basic Bowl Turning

    I'd never touched a lathe in my life (I'm almost 70), now I have four (okay, I upgraded and got some killer deals, so I'm in the process of selling two or three). That world really is a vortex.Now the interesting part - all my work has been spindle work, with exception of four bowls. Let's face it, it's a whole lot easier to do spindle work than bowls, vases and boxes.With the new Nova, I figured I'd better take another stab at bowls. Especially since I live in orchard country and have stacks of crotch wood and such.Anyway, in the course of picking up tips to avoid catches [and excitement], I came here. One point I was looking for was, and riding the bevel aside, where to land the tip when starting into hollowing the bowl. That is, should the tool rest be lower than center point enough t…

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    I'd never touched a lathe in my life (I'm almost 70), now I have four (okay, I upgraded and got some killer deals, so I'm in the process of selling two or three). That world really is a vortex.Now the interesting part - all my work has been spindle work, with exception of four bowls. Let's face it, it's a whole lot easier to do spindle work than bowls, vases and boxes.With the new Nova, I figured I'd better take another stab at bowls. Especially since I live in orchard country and have stacks of crotch wood and such.Anyway, in the course of picking up tips to avoid catches [and excitement], I came here. One point I was looking for was, and riding the bevel aside, where to land the tip when starting into hollowing the bowl. That is, should the tool rest be lower than center point enough the tip can run at center or below, or should cuts be above center point?

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  • KellyCraig commented on jef400dread's instructable Rocket Stove V3
    Rocket Stove V3

    If I were to make a huge modification to an efficient stove like this, it would be an auger to feed fuel. Since I would be using in the absence of power, it would be a mechanically operated auger. The design for the workings of the auger would take a page from a cuckoo clock or grandfather clock page. The weights would be one or more five gallon bucket of concrete raised by way of a pulley system so even a small child could raise them. A rough calibration should have the thing running fairly reliably for hours at a time, allowing the operator to get a warm nights sleep.The unit could be fired by pellets, corn or chunks of wood but to a small enough size the auger could handle them (I have a woodshop with a couple bandsaws).The auger would dump the material in a sealed chute, which coul…

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    If I were to make a huge modification to an efficient stove like this, it would be an auger to feed fuel. Since I would be using in the absence of power, it would be a mechanically operated auger. The design for the workings of the auger would take a page from a cuckoo clock or grandfather clock page. The weights would be one or more five gallon bucket of concrete raised by way of a pulley system so even a small child could raise them. A rough calibration should have the thing running fairly reliably for hours at a time, allowing the operator to get a warm nights sleep.The unit could be fired by pellets, corn or chunks of wood but to a small enough size the auger could handle them (I have a woodshop with a couple bandsaws).The auger would dump the material in a sealed chute, which could even have a tempered glass view port, to monitor blockage.A couple "fool proof" safeties could be built in to insure the unit never developed a backfire up the feed tube, or, if it did, it would just burn out and exhaust into the regular stack.Of course, it would have the option of a regular feed too.

    Here, in the Northwest (actually Central Washington). we have mountains of diatomaceous earth. I think it would make a great replacement for the Perlite. Especially since I can get it free.Another thing to look into, after you've perfected your build, is water glass (sodium silicate). If you look around, you'll find it as one of the ingredients in Castable Refractory Cement used in forges and such.If memory serves, a fire brick is good for about 2,000 degrees, but a soapstone block is good for about 3,000. A soapstone wannabe is said to be doable by way of a baked mix of talk and water glass.

    Robert, my old house in Bremerton, Washington, was one of those with a fancy, nickle plated top, front and sides. On a whim, I got some fire bricks, a piece of heavy gauge metal, some of the door seal rope and glue. I lined the bottom with the bricks, stuck the metal in so it rounded over the top of the fire and forced the fire to roll around the edges, before wandering up the chimney.I glued the front door and the lift off burners shut, sealing them off, to give me more control over air flow. Finally, I added the door gasket.For the few times power went out, this made the otherwise rather inefficient stove much more efficient. Later, on a whim, I added several bricks to the top, in an attempt to get a bit of a flywheel effect. That helped too. Anything that gave the heat something to r…

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    Robert, my old house in Bremerton, Washington, was one of those with a fancy, nickle plated top, front and sides. On a whim, I got some fire bricks, a piece of heavy gauge metal, some of the door seal rope and glue. I lined the bottom with the bricks, stuck the metal in so it rounded over the top of the fire and forced the fire to roll around the edges, before wandering up the chimney.I glued the front door and the lift off burners shut, sealing them off, to give me more control over air flow. Finally, I added the door gasket.For the few times power went out, this made the otherwise rather inefficient stove much more efficient. Later, on a whim, I added several bricks to the top, in an attempt to get a bit of a flywheel effect. That helped too. Anything that gave the heat something to radiate off of during operation.The Net didn't exist back then. Today, it would jet stove all the way.

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  • Resurfacing Cast Iron Pans

    As to refinishing cast iron pans, I know of no one who took smoothing of a pan to the mirror finish level, but I doubt doing so would, in any way, ruin the pan.I could be wrong.As I see it, based on my significant experience polishing everything from resin and plastic to aluminum, brass and iron, at worst, you'd only have to scrub the pan to remove the coating, then let water do it's rust thing, just enough to take the shine off the surface, then remove the rust. Or you could just run over it with 320 to 600 sandpaper.On my table saw, which I confess to having used less than very little for cooking, I used some of my granite polishing diamond pads to produce a final finish you could see your reflection in. In spite of that rather smooth surface, I have no difficulty apply protective coat…

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    As to refinishing cast iron pans, I know of no one who took smoothing of a pan to the mirror finish level, but I doubt doing so would, in any way, ruin the pan.I could be wrong.As I see it, based on my significant experience polishing everything from resin and plastic to aluminum, brass and iron, at worst, you'd only have to scrub the pan to remove the coating, then let water do it's rust thing, just enough to take the shine off the surface, then remove the rust. Or you could just run over it with 320 to 600 sandpaper.On my table saw, which I confess to having used less than very little for cooking, I used some of my granite polishing diamond pads to produce a final finish you could see your reflection in. In spite of that rather smooth surface, I have no difficulty apply protective coatings to the surface.Older pans came machined to a surface similar to the table top of my cabinet saws. That is, very smooth, though you can still see the machining marks. Generally, newer pans, by comparison, are like the one in this Instructable - very bumpy. Too, if pans are not taken to or almost to a mirror finish (with softened (rounded over) edges), they are a danger to glass top or ceramic stove tops.

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  • Resurfacing Cast Iron Pans

    Doing this, I've used my variable speed Milwaukee and Makita angle grinders, my Porter Cable variable speed, random orbit sander-polisher and my Porter Cable random orbit sander. My higher end units would work too. In short, if it gets the job done, it's fair game. Even a standard quarter sheet sander would work.

    I don't know, so am open to new information. Is my torch or the other heat polymerizing the oil or lard, or is it carbonizing it?Generally, polymerization is accomplished by way of reaction with oxygen, at least with "boiled" linseed oil, walnut oil, tung oil and anything else that hardens by way of reaction with oxygen.

    Keep in mind, seasoning is not full on armor. If it were, we could wash the pans in soapy water, like other kitchen ware. As said by Scott, a release agent is a good thing. Even silicone molds benefit from silicone sprays. Here, butter is good ;)

    HUGESee my posts.

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  • What's Old Is New - Fixing an Old Wood Lathe With a Variable Frequency Drive

    Regarding grinders and CBN wheels, and since you are not adverse to dabbling in improving on the old tried and true, consider looking into a bigger, better grinder.I'd been looking into industrial sewing machine motors for some time. The possibilities for a 3/4 horse, variable speed, reversible motor were irresistible (e.g., drill press, small lathes, grinder).I was at one of those dream garage sales and lucked into one for a less than a tenth of the usual $200.00 price tag. I bought the bin it was in without even digging. I wanted that motor a whole bunch. When I got home, not only did it contain the DC motor and controller I wanted, but, under all the aluminum in the bin, I found about $1,000.00 dollars, resale value, in Strarret, Brown and Sharpe type micrometers and things. (okay, i…

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    Regarding grinders and CBN wheels, and since you are not adverse to dabbling in improving on the old tried and true, consider looking into a bigger, better grinder.I'd been looking into industrial sewing machine motors for some time. The possibilities for a 3/4 horse, variable speed, reversible motor were irresistible (e.g., drill press, small lathes, grinder).I was at one of those dream garage sales and lucked into one for a less than a tenth of the usual $200.00 price tag. I bought the bin it was in without even digging. I wanted that motor a whole bunch. When I got home, not only did it contain the DC motor and controller I wanted, but, under all the aluminum in the bin, I found about $1,000.00 dollars, resale value, in Strarret, Brown and Sharpe type micrometers and things. (okay, it's sounding more like a gloat, but....you know).Anyway, my four wheel grinder was powered by a 240 VAC motor. I swapped it for the DC motor and immediately fell in love with the fact I could slow the unit to, say, 300 RPM, or crank it up to a couple thousand RPM, as well as reverse it. Being able to slow the grinder down to all but a crawl, combined with CBN wheels, makes it the ultimate sharpening grinder. You can keep heat to a minimum. Even when it starts to get out of control, such as when re-profiling, you can see it coming and stop long before the tip goes full on blue.

    You've made a monster. You need to get rid of it. Being of a kind heart, my address is.....What an old beauty. I love the riser blocks. Great job and ible.

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  • ZERO CLEARANCE INSERT FOR TABLE SAW

    If I was to say I wanted to see you do anything different, it would be to see you using push shoes, instead of push sticks. The shoes hold down several inches farther in than do the sticks, like you were using. This means fewer kickbacks, since they hold down closer to the back of the blade, where kickbacks start.Once you use them a bit, you'll never want to go back to the sticks, though you will still use them, from time to time, in addition to the shoes.I have a removable, adjustable cabinet over my cabinet saw, so I can reach up and grab one of the many push sticks over my head. I even have a bunch of push "fingers" I use, religiously, with my bandsaws.https://www.lumberjocks.com/projects/105726

    I have a box of zero clearance inserts, since doing that way is easy and as long as I'm set up, I might as well pump out a bunch of them for 22-1/2, 45 and 90 degree cuts, and dado cuts.

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  • Steampunk Lamp "The MERKER Light"

    Okay, I like your lamp, BUT the photos of the overall room and goodies are off the charts.

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  • KellyCraig commented on Wood Review's instructable How to Turn Scoops
  • Basics: Join Plastic - #3 Seams & Seals

    Nice Ible, even if many will pass it up because they missed the many possibilities it opens up. It is a great reminder that we are not limited to what the experts and stores offer in the way of things useful to us, as we go about our daily deeds.I made my own bag sealer back in the day. I used a couple pieces of Corian, some plexi for the hinged lid, and some door gasket material to creat the seal between the lid and the body of the sealer.To pull a vacuum, I used a nebulizer. Merely switching the hose to the other side so converted it to a vacuum pump from a compressor.To seal the bags, I used a commercial sealer with adjustable controls.Unlike sealers sold for the home, the home built one, because of the adjustable temp, could use any bags. And it was limited only to the size bags I …

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    Nice Ible, even if many will pass it up because they missed the many possibilities it opens up. It is a great reminder that we are not limited to what the experts and stores offer in the way of things useful to us, as we go about our daily deeds.I made my own bag sealer back in the day. I used a couple pieces of Corian, some plexi for the hinged lid, and some door gasket material to creat the seal between the lid and the body of the sealer.To pull a vacuum, I used a nebulizer. Merely switching the hose to the other side so converted it to a vacuum pump from a compressor.To seal the bags, I used a commercial sealer with adjustable controls.Unlike sealers sold for the home, the home built one, because of the adjustable temp, could use any bags. And it was limited only to the size bags I chose. I could seal bags up sixteen inches wide.To make the body, I cut two pieces of Corian to the same size. Next, I cut the center out of one. Then I siliconed the two together. This gave me the well your downtown sealers use (where you put the top of the bag).To allow me to connect the nebulizer/vacuum pump, I drilled a hole through the side of the piece with the center cut out. The hole was just large enough to force the hose into.It worked great.

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  • It might help if you gave a bit more background. Several on this site might be able to offer information, in addition to formulas or laws, you hadn't thought of.It sounds like you are trying to make some sort of igniter. If so, you don't need the power supply to run very long. Just long enough to fire a rocket, commit arson, etc.

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  • KellyCraig commented on PFO's instructable Fixing a Slipping F-clamp
    Fixing a Slipping F-clamp

    Something else to consider: I removed the stop pin with a drift punch. That allowed me to slide the moving section off the bar and inspect the the rectangular iron bars, which were worn down. I flipped them, but you may be able to file sharp edges back onto them too.

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  • High Quality (and Safe) Copper Plating

    I'm betting the brush on approach would be your best bet. There are kits for this purpose and it's how printing press rollers were repaired on the presses, rather than shutting down the whole operation.Immersion plating a large project is a challenge and, probably, requires the standard acid bath or arsenic, if you're plating steel. I do quit a bit of hobby plating (you can see some of my projects on the LumberJocks woodworking site at https://www.lumberjocks.com/projects/348297). To plate the things I plate I, generally, am only using a half volt and a half amp. However, the larger the surface, the more amperage you'll need. Still, a 12VDC charger is likely to just create a disaster. Possibly a dangerous one.

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  • How to Stain a Fence With a Sprayer

    I used to clean and maintain fences professionally. That meant using a pressure washer. As indicated, they can do a lot of damage and do it very quickly.Pressure washer tips come in colors to aid in choosing the right tip for the right job. Think of the red tips as carving tips, because they will carve your fence very quickly. So, unless your hand writing is very good and you intend to carve your name in your fence or siding, avoid them.Too, when cleaning soft things like wood, avoid the rotary heads. They will just make your washer a better carver.My pressure washer is an industrial version. The pressure at the tip is around 4,000 pounds per square inch [PSI]. That is well above the average pressure washer sold for home use. In spite of those numbers, mine has, successfully, and safe…

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    I used to clean and maintain fences professionally. That meant using a pressure washer. As indicated, they can do a lot of damage and do it very quickly.Pressure washer tips come in colors to aid in choosing the right tip for the right job. Think of the red tips as carving tips, because they will carve your fence very quickly. So, unless your hand writing is very good and you intend to carve your name in your fence or siding, avoid them.Too, when cleaning soft things like wood, avoid the rotary heads. They will just make your washer a better carver.My pressure washer is an industrial version. The pressure at the tip is around 4,000 pounds per square inch [PSI]. That is well above the average pressure washer sold for home use. In spite of those numbers, mine has, successfully, and safely cleaned a lot of siding and fences. The reason I am able to use a high pressure system without damaging wood is, I use the widest tip available. Usually, this is the WHITE one. The fan produced by the tip spreads the pressure out, rather than concentrating it. Keep in mind, you can still carve with the white tips, otherwise you they would not remove the old , loose finish and UV damaged surface wood. Key to avoiding carving is, DO NOT pull the handle with the wand pointing at the wood, AND start cleaning with the wand at least two feet away, until you get the feel for what is that happy spot for cleaning. That, probably, will be about a foot and a half down to a foot, depending on your unit.Another critical thing to remember is, do not point the wand at windows or anything you do not want to destroy when pulling the trigger. In my years of pressure washing, I've had a lot of tips launch from the wand, never to be found. Had the wand been pointing at a window, it would have broken it. Of course, it's good idea to choose your target so, if the tip does launch, you'll know where to find it.When done right, the wood may fuzz up, but that is because of the water, rather than the pressure of the unit. This is a common problem in wood work, since even water based stains will raise the wood. The problem of raised wood is often solved by raising the wood on purpose, letting it dry, then sanding it, after which the water in the water borne stain will not raise fibers and grain.

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  • How to Make Stylish Kiridashi/Utility Knife

    VERY nice. I may have to go here for experimenting with chip carving knives.

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  • Concrete Faux Bois Up-cycled Chair

    This is just WAY cool. Nice, and thanks for the ible.

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  • As often as not, there will be a 2x on one or both walls, at the corner. There, certainly, will be horizontal ones at the top and bottom, because they were necessary for mounting the drywall.You could modify the design a bit and have some of the plywood running up against the ceiling. That could mean having that one or two toilet-paper rolls you have to work to get. Or you could find something decorative to put at the top.With the extended height [and no shelf on the top end, which would get in the way of mounting the rack] it would just be a simple matter of running a single screw through the TP rack into the 1-1/2" 2x at the top, with the rack pressed up against the ceiling.The screw through the rack should, of course, be centered, and would be about 3/4" down from the rack t…

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    As often as not, there will be a 2x on one or both walls, at the corner. There, certainly, will be horizontal ones at the top and bottom, because they were necessary for mounting the drywall.You could modify the design a bit and have some of the plywood running up against the ceiling. That could mean having that one or two toilet-paper rolls you have to work to get. Or you could find something decorative to put at the top.With the extended height [and no shelf on the top end, which would get in the way of mounting the rack] it would just be a simple matter of running a single screw through the TP rack into the 1-1/2" 2x at the top, with the rack pressed up against the ceiling.The screw through the rack should, of course, be centered, and would be about 3/4" down from the rack top.Try to land the screw, through the 1/2" sheet rock, about 3/4" down from the ceiling. Run it in at a slight angle to avoid fighting with the ceiling.A small, say, one inch square piece or two of a foam type commercial sticky, which would only stick to your rack, should keep the rack from playing pendulum. Especially with the length of the rack and gravity working for you.

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  • I'm drawn to rabbit trails. Yours was one I came across trying to get an idea of how harps are built, which was a rabbit trail I got off on when someone asked about making the T brace for one (he wanted a turning and I commented about a dulcimer I helped my buddy make in my shop). It was GREAT seeing an Instructable had been made of a build.Needless to say, I downloaded, and had to come here and say thanks, and NICE JOB.

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  • I think you're right, as long as you stayed in the plywood and it was clamped tight. If you tried cutting on the outer edge, I'm guessing all hell would break loose.That might mean using 3/4 ply, so you can bury the clamping screws, to keep the area cut flat on the table, to avoid grabbing problems that could result cutting the material.

    Variable speed grinders aside, most run from 2,000 RPM to about 7,200. I would not use this with most angle grinders, since they operate at high speed. Even 2,000 RPM is fast, if polishing plastics, poly and so on. You have to move pretty fast to keep from burning the finish or plastic.

    HmmmI used to work at R.E.I. and that's how they cut foot high layers of fabric.I don't see why one couldn't rescue a blade or two and experiment.

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  • Any clear surface coat will go south on you. The moves, with humidity changes, at a different rate than does the clear coat, so the clear coat will crack and peel.The wood dries and, as it does, it shrinks, creating cracks and splits. You can slow and even stop them with a non-hardening oil.To use a non-hardening oil, thin it with paint thinner about 15% to 20%. Apply it and let it soak in, then keep applying more oil, until it quits soaking in quickly. Add a final coat and let it set and soak in.In a week or two you can add more. The more you add, the more you bring the wood back to a "moisture" content near it was when new. As the oil soaks in, it will swell the wood, causing many of the cracks and splits to disappear. If the wood is full of oil, it will, of course, repel …

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    Any clear surface coat will go south on you. The moves, with humidity changes, at a different rate than does the clear coat, so the clear coat will crack and peel.The wood dries and, as it does, it shrinks, creating cracks and splits. You can slow and even stop them with a non-hardening oil.To use a non-hardening oil, thin it with paint thinner about 15% to 20%. Apply it and let it soak in, then keep applying more oil, until it quits soaking in quickly. Add a final coat and let it set and soak in.In a week or two you can add more. The more you add, the more you bring the wood back to a "moisture" content near it was when new. As the oil soaks in, it will swell the wood, causing many of the cracks and splits to disappear. If the wood is full of oil, it will, of course, repel water. This will reduce cracking and splitting due to freezing, in areas where that is a problem.What you did apply will seem to have evaporated, after a short time in the sun. It isn't. It's wicking deeper into the wood. As the wood takes on more oil, the oil will show more. It will turn gray wood to a gold.For a non-hardening oil, you can use common motor oil. I leave it up to you as to where you get it.In the end, your fence will look better than neighbor's years down the road.If you don't have a sprayer, thinning the oil will allow you to apply it with a pump up sprayer, if you desire. Of course, you can always brush or roll it on.Lay plastic under paint/oil buckets to protect concrete.Sprayers of all kinds throw mist in the air - WEAR A MASK.

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  • Good question.I drilled a couple holes. One at each end and centered on the bar (It was easy to do and would not affect the operation of the clamp).The farther toward the ends of the clamp the holes are drilled, the better, since the holes will be where the clamp mounts to the wood and their position will determine how far the clamp opens or closes.

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  • It's soooo tempting to say, "Hey, I drilled a hole in my old acoustic and stuck the other end of the cord in, but get no sound...."Meanwhile, nice ible.

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  • But they are nowhere near being in the same category. I have three dust collectors in my shop and three cyclones. The cyclones remove all but a small percentage of what is drawn in. This means MUCH longer run times before filters have to be cleaned, which equates to higher collection efficiency.

    I came here to, after giving thumbs up for a great instructable, to point out the ABSOLUTE need for an output filter. fglemam got there first.I have three cyclones (sold the larger Dust Gorilla after retirement) on three units and there are several reasons for a filter on the output. The first is what you mentioned - the fines that get past the cyclone.NEXT is, when the drum gets full, or if the drum has air leaks, the amount passing through the cyclone GREATLY increases.Pentz is a top notch source for info on cyclones and his products are great. However, even his systems are subject to the problems noted above.Keep in mind, the toys (vacuums and filters) we buy downtown are often called dust pumps for the garbage they throw back into the air. The foam you see around filters is just a…

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    I came here to, after giving thumbs up for a great instructable, to point out the ABSOLUTE need for an output filter. fglemam got there first.I have three cyclones (sold the larger Dust Gorilla after retirement) on three units and there are several reasons for a filter on the output. The first is what you mentioned - the fines that get past the cyclone.NEXT is, when the drum gets full, or if the drum has air leaks, the amount passing through the cyclone GREATLY increases.Pentz is a top notch source for info on cyclones and his products are great. However, even his systems are subject to the problems noted above.Keep in mind, the toys (vacuums and filters) we buy downtown are often called dust pumps for the garbage they throw back into the air. The foam you see around filters is just a pre-filter, to stop large items (e.g., gerbils, the neighbor's kid, etc.).

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  • I have, absolutely, no interest in making these. However, when I saw them I had come here and comment to give you a high five for a job well done. On all levels.These are just too fun.Excellent work on both the project and ible.

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  • THUMBS UPThis addresses one of the things that have driven me nuts for thirty plus years - people scattering files all over their computers, and dumping everything into a single folder.First, I create a main folder I labeled "Documents and Data." This stems from the days when the Gates crowd were so much smarter than us they arranged things so reloading or repairing the O.S. left the O.S. Documents folder at its original state - empty of your thousands of files.From there, I create sub folders in common, to me, categories, like "Personal," "Clients and Customers," "Friends" "Hobby," "Home," "Automotive," "Health" and "General Reference."Once I have those, I begin building sub-folders, such as "…

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    THUMBS UPThis addresses one of the things that have driven me nuts for thirty plus years - people scattering files all over their computers, and dumping everything into a single folder.First, I create a main folder I labeled "Documents and Data." This stems from the days when the Gates crowd were so much smarter than us they arranged things so reloading or repairing the O.S. left the O.S. Documents folder at its original state - empty of your thousands of files.From there, I create sub folders in common, to me, categories, like "Personal," "Clients and Customers," "Friends" "Hobby," "Home," "Automotive," "Health" and "General Reference."Once I have those, I begin building sub-folders, such as "Projects," "Legal," "Poems and Stories" or what have you.For the General Reference folder, I have folders like, "Electronics," "Magnetics," "Granite Work," "Remodeling," "Auto Repairs," Tools & Equipment" and so on.In short, I have sub-folder upon sub-folder, to allow my to categorize and organize files.The index of one of my main folders, containing all documents in various formats, prints out to over three hundred sixty pages. In spite of that, I can find documents I and others need in a relatively short time.

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  • True. If you, for example, use a ratchet to hold the tap, hold the ratchet at the head, rather than out at the handle.Too, I've used my cordless drill to tap many holes.

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  • Very clever. I think I'll build a version and keep it in my sandblast cabinet for specialty work.

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  • Great instructable and nice end product, BUT. . . If only for the instructable, it would have been nice to see you using a push shoe, while running the pieces through the table saw.When I was your age, way back when I was quick, I would not have been, and you wouldn't either, be quick enough to beat a kickback.After you get used to using shoes, it's hard not to. They don't slow me down enough to be notable, and they make the job a WHOLE lot more comfortable, let alone safe.Next is, the warning of what can happen when you run glue ups like yours through a planner. Better men than either of us have lost good planers to such. A few suffered worse than tool damage. Others just had to change their shorts.Many experienced sawdust maker has done it for years, only to get bit by the practice o…

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    Great instructable and nice end product, BUT. . . If only for the instructable, it would have been nice to see you using a push shoe, while running the pieces through the table saw.When I was your age, way back when I was quick, I would not have been, and you wouldn't either, be quick enough to beat a kickback.After you get used to using shoes, it's hard not to. They don't slow me down enough to be notable, and they make the job a WHOLE lot more comfortable, let alone safe.Next is, the warning of what can happen when you run glue ups like yours through a planner. Better men than either of us have lost good planers to such. A few suffered worse than tool damage. Others just had to change their shorts.Many experienced sawdust maker has done it for years, only to get bit by the practice on down the road. Several, I've been in discussions with, say they never did it again.On a final note, and for those unaware, the pin with the nylon on it, in the photos of the routering, is to keep all hell from breaking loose. For routering things like this, these pins are a must and all good router tables have them. They allow you to feed the stock into the bit, by pivoting it, and keep the bit from grabbing the pieces and tossing it.

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  • On the sandblast, consider old school approaches too. For example:1) Cover a pieces of plastic or glass with contact paper, to act as the resistance to keep the sand from etching areas of an item you intend to keep clear. I found the cream colors worked best, since they showed pen, pencil and graphite trace paper well. Even better than white.2) Trace lettering or a picture on to the contact paper by taping a piece of graphite trace paper over it, then the picture you want to transfer over that. 3) Use a pen or pencil to trace your letters and/or image.4) Check for misses by lifting one corner of the taped trace paper and pattern and, if okay, remove them. Carefully, if you want to use them again (you can get several runs out of the graphite/carbon paper.5) Use and Exact type blade to cu…

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    On the sandblast, consider old school approaches too. For example:1) Cover a pieces of plastic or glass with contact paper, to act as the resistance to keep the sand from etching areas of an item you intend to keep clear. I found the cream colors worked best, since they showed pen, pencil and graphite trace paper well. Even better than white.2) Trace lettering or a picture on to the contact paper by taping a piece of graphite trace paper over it, then the picture you want to transfer over that. 3) Use a pen or pencil to trace your letters and/or image.4) Check for misses by lifting one corner of the taped trace paper and pattern and, if okay, remove them. Carefully, if you want to use them again (you can get several runs out of the graphite/carbon paper.5) Use and Exact type blade to cut out the design. I mark the pieces I want removed to reveal the areas to be blasted, to make it easier to keep track, when doing complex patterns.NOTE: If the tip of the Exacto blade breaks, use a stone to bring it back to a point. They break VERY easily, but by just re-pointing the blade, it can, literally, go for years.6) Using a fine blast media, turn the compressor down to a maximum of about 40 PSI and etch the areas where the resistance (contact paper) was removed. Keep the nozzle ninety degrees to less the likelihood of blowing the resistance loose.NOTE: Lower air pressure takes longer to etch, but can allow you to monitor the etching coming in. Too, it's perfect for adding shading, which can be done by leaving strategic pieces of the resistance on, then lifting them and etching again, at about half the pressure (e.g., 22 PSI). Scroll through my Flicker page to see examples of simple etches using this approach.https://www.flickr.com/photos/functional_art/

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  • I find the debate about air movement just short of comical. If the fan draws air up, the air already there would have to move elsewhere. As such, the mere fact there is air movement should be the critical issue. Of course, there is the issue of having air blow directly on you, but in each house I've lived in, the fans were situated in locations that made this a non-issue.

    Just keep in mind, doors have gaps to allow air movement for heating and cooling. Normally, the only doors that fit tight around all four edges are doors going to the exterior.If your furnace return were in a room with the door sealed and the room had no vent, the furnace wouldn't be able to transfer air throughout the home. And, of course, if the room had a vent to allow air to return to the furnace, there would be no gain in sealing the door.

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  • On Chinese purchases, I remodeled my kitchen a few years back and saved a small fortune ording light bars from other than U.S. sellers.When I wired the kitche (walls all still open), I jumped sinks and so on so all under-cabinet lights could be on one circuit. I wired the under-cabinet lights for halogens, since LED's were still expensive. As such, dimming would have been done via a 120 volt dimmer. LED's dropped and I gambled on a Chinese supplier purchase from LightingWill-dot-com. The lights were perfect, but I couldn't bury a xformer in the wall and dimming at the lights was not practical, but which I would have had to do using a standard power supply (rectifier). By switching to a magnetic transformer (much more expensive), I was able to dim through it, rather than via the outpu…

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    On Chinese purchases, I remodeled my kitchen a few years back and saved a small fortune ording light bars from other than U.S. sellers.When I wired the kitche (walls all still open), I jumped sinks and so on so all under-cabinet lights could be on one circuit. I wired the under-cabinet lights for halogens, since LED's were still expensive. As such, dimming would have been done via a 120 volt dimmer. LED's dropped and I gambled on a Chinese supplier purchase from LightingWill-dot-com. The lights were perfect, but I couldn't bury a xformer in the wall and dimming at the lights was not practical, but which I would have had to do using a standard power supply (rectifier). By switching to a magnetic transformer (much more expensive), I was able to dim through it, rather than via the output, allowing me to install dimable LED bars all around my counters (set back about 1-1/2" so the light hit the end of the counter).

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    • Making and Using Inexpensive Buff Compounds for Wood, Plasics and Resin
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  • OBillo, I'm a fanatic about mineral oil and bread or cutting boards. I bought a butcher block cart some years back and it had been sorely neglected, to the point the joints were separating and cracks and splits were showing from the wood shrinking over the years. I slathered mineral oil on and kept adding it wherever it soaked in. Once it quit readily taking in oil, I slathered a VERY general layer on and just walked away.I came back to the butcherblock a few weeks later and, of course, the oil had all soaked in. Too, it had wicked in to the point it expanded the wood back to near what it was when the moisture content was higher. As a result, ALL the cracks, splits and separations were no longer visible.

    You've got the name of this game, Obillo - expirimentaiton. The commercial stuff uses mineral oil, and it works. I treated my old kitchen knives with a beeswax, mineral oil finish and they look better than they did out of the box forty years ago.Obviously, though thick, vasoline would melt like the wax does under friction, so it's all fair game. I do plan on test driving baking soda, corn starch and common flour as buff powders soon. Somewhere in all this, there's room for Bon Ami (sp?) and other "no scratch" cleaners too.

    O, regarding rottenstone, some lumber yards carry it, as would, as you suspepect, some paint supply stores. Diatomaceious earth may be available wherever you buy things to get rid of bug type pests. You want the raw stuff. Many bags of floor cleaner are nothing more than diatomaceous earth, but I don't know how fine they are. You, of course, want fine stuff. Avoid the filter material from pool supplies and such because it's been crystalized by putting it under high heat (which is also the type that is leathal to us and animals, whereas the raw is not).Cameo or Bar Keeper's Friend might work too. Some say the BonAmi scratches less, so it would stand that it must be more fine. Regardless, they are stainless steel cleaning powders and available at the local grocery.

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