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KellyCraig

Kelly Craig
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30Instructables170,649Views403CommentsDesert Aire, Eastern Washington

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Build a Tool Contest 2017
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  • Downdraft Sanding Table From Scraps

    I have a large router table, but it just seems easier to grab the D-handle at times. I just stick boards out the back, since there is a 12" solid wall, but above that is all nylon (clear plastic would work well too).Anyway, the next time you get a problem box you have to tear down, try adding sides and a back, then throw some clear plastic over the top and see what you think. I suspect you'll be amazed, once the collector or vac can only draw air in from where you're sitting.

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  • Build a Better Harvey Oil Filter

    FIRST, I don't even play an expert on YouTube.That aside, it should be noted there is a big difference between the engine oil many of us grew up with and oil used in modern cars.To alter viscosity, older types of oil used polymer fibers. Heat breaks these fibers down and the oil loses it's ability to change viscosity with weather conditions.Today, many cars use 20 all year round and that is done by means other than polymers, so the oil holds up much better.Too, engine oils pick up acids from the combustion processes. Filters have/had chemicals to neutralize these acids, but, over time, the neutralizers play out. Here, we are not talking engine oils. We are talking oils that, though they do deal with some heat, are not subjected to exhaust gases and combustion temps.Add to all the foregoin…

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    FIRST, I don't even play an expert on YouTube.That aside, it should be noted there is a big difference between the engine oil many of us grew up with and oil used in modern cars.To alter viscosity, older types of oil used polymer fibers. Heat breaks these fibers down and the oil loses it's ability to change viscosity with weather conditions.Today, many cars use 20 all year round and that is done by means other than polymers, so the oil holds up much better.Too, engine oils pick up acids from the combustion processes. Filters have/had chemicals to neutralize these acids, but, over time, the neutralizers play out. Here, we are not talking engine oils. We are talking oils that, though they do deal with some heat, are not subjected to exhaust gases and combustion temps.Add to all the foregoing, the quality of filter you use is a game changer. For example, many of us will not use Fram filters, in spite of the great job they did of promoting their products. Instead, we use filters from manufacturers who make their own filters and do so to specific specs, unlike Bosch and others.

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  • Downdraft Sanding Table From Scraps

    REALLY crank up the efficiency of your new tool (like a 1000 %) by putting sides, a back and a top on it. I did that to mine. I forced the air to come from where you are working, rather than from everywhere behind, beside and above where you are working.The sanding station became one of my most used shop tools (if you saw my shop, you'd know that's saying a lot).I even router in it. You can watch the dust drop, then do a ninety into the hundreds of tiny ports.Mine is sloped down in back, because I PRESUMED it would aid collection of dust. The major changes I would make is, making mine bigger, because it is such a valued tool, and make the top hinge up, in case I let it eat a Dremel adapter or tip.As it is, if something I value falls in, I have to go to the back, pull the hose and grope …

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    REALLY crank up the efficiency of your new tool (like a 1000 %) by putting sides, a back and a top on it. I did that to mine. I forced the air to come from where you are working, rather than from everywhere behind, beside and above where you are working.The sanding station became one of my most used shop tools (if you saw my shop, you'd know that's saying a lot).I even router in it. You can watch the dust drop, then do a ninety into the hundreds of tiny ports.Mine is sloped down in back, because I PRESUMED it would aid collection of dust. The major changes I would make is, making mine bigger, because it is such a valued tool, and make the top hinge up, in case I let it eat a Dremel adapter or tip.As it is, if something I value falls in, I have to go to the back, pull the hose and grope around until I find it.

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  • KellyCraig commented on nathb1028's instructable Freeze Dry at Home
    Freeze Dry at Home

    I ended up on this page again, searching for more information on freeze drying (I took the plunge and bought a unit, which may be a good investment here in apple and field crop country.Waiting for the freeze dryer to arrive, I thought I'd experiment. I have a couple gallons of beads and a vacuum stabilization system. Just started, so we'll see how it goes. Day one and a there was enough moisture most of the beads changed color, so I released the vacuum and swapped out the beads.Got to thinking, there is a lot more moisture in the food I'm experimenting with than in the air. As such, it would be interesting to run my vacuum pump full time, while allowing a tiny bit of fresh air in.So I didn't saturate the oil with water evaporated off the fruit and such as bad, I wondered about using a us…

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    I ended up on this page again, searching for more information on freeze drying (I took the plunge and bought a unit, which may be a good investment here in apple and field crop country.Waiting for the freeze dryer to arrive, I thought I'd experiment. I have a couple gallons of beads and a vacuum stabilization system. Just started, so we'll see how it goes. Day one and a there was enough moisture most of the beads changed color, so I released the vacuum and swapped out the beads.Got to thinking, there is a lot more moisture in the food I'm experimenting with than in the air. As such, it would be interesting to run my vacuum pump full time, while allowing a tiny bit of fresh air in.So I didn't saturate the oil with water evaporated off the fruit and such as bad, I wondered about using a used HVAC coil and fin set up to condense the moisture, before it got to the pump (I just donated one to the local salvage guy, and might have to go get it back. ;) . . . .

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  • KellyCraig commented on BrittLiv's instructable Ozone Generator
    Ozone Generator

    Oxygen concentrators are for people with low oxygen level problems. I doubt they'd be problematic for dumping the little bit of oxygen they generate into a room.

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  • 10 Woodworking Tricks the Pros Use

    On cutting sandpaper, and old trick is to use a hacksaw blade mounted on a piece of plywood with a couple flat washers between the blade and the wood.Mark the back of a sheet of paper by drawing one horizontal and one vertical line across the center of it (a plus sign). This should give you four sheets of paper for a quarter sheet sander.Slide the paper under the blade and line the line with the teeth. Use a felt tip to draw around the bottom of the sheet [on to the plywood]. Tear the piece of paper by dragging it across the blade, like you would tearing off a piece of waxed paper.Now, take one of the smaller pieces and slide it under the blade, again aligning with the teeth. Draw a line around the bottom of the smaller piece of paper.The two outlines will show you where to align all fu…

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    On cutting sandpaper, and old trick is to use a hacksaw blade mounted on a piece of plywood with a couple flat washers between the blade and the wood.Mark the back of a sheet of paper by drawing one horizontal and one vertical line across the center of it (a plus sign). This should give you four sheets of paper for a quarter sheet sander.Slide the paper under the blade and line the line with the teeth. Use a felt tip to draw around the bottom of the sheet [on to the plywood]. Tear the piece of paper by dragging it across the blade, like you would tearing off a piece of waxed paper.Now, take one of the smaller pieces and slide it under the blade, again aligning with the teeth. Draw a line around the bottom of the smaller piece of paper.The two outlines will show you where to align all future pieces of sandpaper for cutting to size for your sander.If you wanted, you could mount pieces of wood at the lines so when the paper was against them, it would be the same as lining up the paper with the lines, but even quicker.

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  • D I Y, Inexpensive Buff Compounds [Plasic, Epoxy, Wood]

    Thanks for the heads up on Barkeepers friend. That does offer a suggestion for other uses on small projects though.I have a gallon of the calcium carbonate for "milk paint," so I'll have give it a test run. Even more so since a friend just dropped off ten pounds of beeswax (guess where he works (no more used toilet rings for me (snort))).

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  • Adding a Dust Collection System

    A good point made by many is, if you are going to get deep into upgrades of the HF unit, you might as well buy a unit that started out as what you're shooting for.Add $200.00 and some materials for a filter upgrade, the cost of the cyclone or other means of taking out most of what is picked up, toss in an impeller upgrade and you're already around $500.00, plus the pre-filter.I have a little HF on my miter box because I needed a filter I could pack out to the yard and use with my cyclone for pine cone duty, to vacuum paint chips from gravel after a building was scraped to prep it for paint and so on.I note a big difference between the $160.00 (25% coupon) HF unit and the 1-1/2 horse Jet I sold about five years ago.

    Karmudjun, big shops use metal because piping designed for the purpose of dust collection is far more readily available than anything in plastic, and it's actually cheaper. Metal pipe is sized and otherwise designed for the purpose of collecting dust from machines. HVAC ducts are not always a good fit for dust collection. HVAC systems are designed solely to push air, while dust collectors pull it. More than one person found out, the hard way, some large ducting was of a metal gauge too light for the jog of handling a vacuum, which grows when a pipe is plugged, or even if you just press the vacuum wand against the floor or another object.Many use the spiral piping because the spiral joints add rigidity to the piping not seen in the same size and gauge of pipe with a single seam, like stove…

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    Karmudjun, big shops use metal because piping designed for the purpose of dust collection is far more readily available than anything in plastic, and it's actually cheaper. Metal pipe is sized and otherwise designed for the purpose of collecting dust from machines. HVAC ducts are not always a good fit for dust collection. HVAC systems are designed solely to push air, while dust collectors pull it. More than one person found out, the hard way, some large ducting was of a metal gauge too light for the jog of handling a vacuum, which grows when a pipe is plugged, or even if you just press the vacuum wand against the floor or another object.Many use the spiral piping because the spiral joints add rigidity to the piping not seen in the same size and gauge of pipe with a single seam, like stove pipe.Even little 3hp to 5hp systems use 8" pipes. Larger collectors use 10" and larger pipes. At that point, metal pipes are no more expensive than plastic ones.Then there is the matter of finding long sweeps, to avoid sharp 90's, or resorting to Y's.As to not showing up in "your" ER, I'll do us both a favor and not address.

    To those on the fence about the cartridge filter upgrade, I have two 3 hp collectors. One still has two upper bags and the other has two cartridges. If I put a 20' hose on both and a wand to use the collector as a shop vac (cuts shop clean up time greatly), there is a notable difference between the two with regard to how well each systems picks up dust and debris off the floor. The cartridge unit wins hands down, without even getting into complicated testing methods.Next, there is the matter of dropping heavy items out before they hit your expensive filters - it's worth the time or effort. Too, it means your impellers will take far less of a beating from items. Finally, it means that pair of pliers or adjustable wrench will survive the ordeal of being vacuumed up, because they did not go…

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    To those on the fence about the cartridge filter upgrade, I have two 3 hp collectors. One still has two upper bags and the other has two cartridges. If I put a 20' hose on both and a wand to use the collector as a shop vac (cuts shop clean up time greatly), there is a notable difference between the two with regard to how well each systems picks up dust and debris off the floor. The cartridge unit wins hands down, without even getting into complicated testing methods.Next, there is the matter of dropping heavy items out before they hit your expensive filters - it's worth the time or effort. Too, it means your impellers will take far less of a beating from items. Finally, it means that pair of pliers or adjustable wrench will survive the ordeal of being vacuumed up, because they did not go through the impeller (you should see what one of those does to a pair of aviator glasses.

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  • Replacing a Wood Lathe Motor With a Treadmill Motor

    After digging around a bit, I see a lot of people more knowledgeable on matters of electronics point out we can get better performance of our rectifier-controller circuits by adding a D.C. capacitor across the positive and negative D.C. output terminals of the bridge rectifier.It's indicated the first and most important thing in choosing a cap is, the voltage. Since we are dealing with 120 volts, we need around a 200 volt cap for our D.C. motor circuits.I installed 200 volt, 560 uf cap on mine. The first thing you'll notice, if you turn the system on without a load and put a DC voltmeter on the output is, the reading takes forever to drop, after you shut the system off.In other words, the cap is doing what it's supposed to - supplying power between pulses out of the rectifier, to smooth t…

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    After digging around a bit, I see a lot of people more knowledgeable on matters of electronics point out we can get better performance of our rectifier-controller circuits by adding a D.C. capacitor across the positive and negative D.C. output terminals of the bridge rectifier.It's indicated the first and most important thing in choosing a cap is, the voltage. Since we are dealing with 120 volts, we need around a 200 volt cap for our D.C. motor circuits.I installed 200 volt, 560 uf cap on mine. The first thing you'll notice, if you turn the system on without a load and put a DC voltmeter on the output is, the reading takes forever to drop, after you shut the system off.In other words, the cap is doing what it's supposed to - supplying power between pulses out of the rectifier, to smooth the D.C. output.

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  • Replacing a Wood Lathe Motor With a Treadmill Motor

    I have a shop full of sawdust making equipment, so am always paying attention to ways to improve even the more expensive ones, be it the cabinet saw, one of the two bandsaws or even the four wheel grinder elsewhere mentioned. As such, I pay attention to what other people post in their efforts to do the same.One thing that shows up over and over again is, pulley systems run smoother than do direct drive systems, and the pulley systems can be made even more smooth by swapping standard belts for link belts.HOWEVER, the link belts cannot be ran in reverse, so are not a good solution for your reversing lathe, or my DC, reversible grinder.For my lathe, I may not opt for the reverse option because sanding or applying finishes has been the only time I MIGHT have wanted to reverse the lathe, but i…

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    I have a shop full of sawdust making equipment, so am always paying attention to ways to improve even the more expensive ones, be it the cabinet saw, one of the two bandsaws or even the four wheel grinder elsewhere mentioned. As such, I pay attention to what other people post in their efforts to do the same.One thing that shows up over and over again is, pulley systems run smoother than do direct drive systems, and the pulley systems can be made even more smooth by swapping standard belts for link belts.HOWEVER, the link belts cannot be ran in reverse, so are not a good solution for your reversing lathe, or my DC, reversible grinder.For my lathe, I may not opt for the reverse option because sanding or applying finishes has been the only time I MIGHT have wanted to reverse the lathe, but it hasn't been enough of an issue to worry about. Opinions?

    Cap'n Eddie was my go to guy when I was starting to figure out ways to gun down on my scrap wood pile. He is great. Now, with this post, so are you. ;)I fell in love with variable speed motors long ago. I lucked into a 3/4 horse with the controller in a box of goodies at a garage sale and now my four wheel grinder (two CBN wheels).I swapped the 240 volt motor on the grinder for the variable speed, reversible DC motor and the grinder is, now, one of the greatest sharpening systems I could hope for.Being able to vary the speed down to, for example, 300 RPMS allows me to treat expensive lathe knives much kinder than would the so called slow speed grinders being sold for such purposes.ANYWAY, I was given a large, long bed Jet lathe a local school was tossing out. The Reeves drive just need…

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    Cap'n Eddie was my go to guy when I was starting to figure out ways to gun down on my scrap wood pile. He is great. Now, with this post, so are you. ;)I fell in love with variable speed motors long ago. I lucked into a 3/4 horse with the controller in a box of goodies at a garage sale and now my four wheel grinder (two CBN wheels).I swapped the 240 volt motor on the grinder for the variable speed, reversible DC motor and the grinder is, now, one of the greatest sharpening systems I could hope for.Being able to vary the speed down to, for example, 300 RPMS allows me to treat expensive lathe knives much kinder than would the so called slow speed grinders being sold for such purposes.ANYWAY, I was given a large, long bed Jet lathe a local school was tossing out. The Reeves drive just needed lubing and a new control handle. Now, it works great.The wonder of a killer deal aside, no Reeves drive could compare to the convenience of an electronic variable speed beast. Too, there is that the lathe model has the motor positioned where it limits some turning operations. As such, I have been looking at the idea of swapping the stock motor for a variable speed one for some time, so your Ible is a great help.Then it's off to the drill press.THANKS.

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  • Make Your Own Fishing Lures

    Now that you have a lathe, it's not as big a deal, but is there a reason you did not make the square shape in two cuts rather than four?

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  • How to Easily Ebonize Wood

    I wonder if this might be better classed as a dye than a stain. In woodworking, we, generally, think of stains as surface coats, even though the stain does make its way into the pores of the wood and some of the oils (if using an oil based stain) will penetrate, slightly, into the wood.Dyes, on the other hand, penetrate the surface of the wood. They are less prone to hiding the wood grain because they do penetrate, rather than rest on the surface.

    Interesting suggestion. I do quite a bit of copper plating. To do that, I always place the metal I want flowed onto an item on the positive lead, which, for such purposes, is called the anode.Any metal would work for the negative lead, called the cathode in plating operations. Keep in mind, the cathode will be coated with iron from the steel wool, so may not be usable for much else after a significant amount of use, but might be cleaned up by switching it over to the anode and using something else as a sacrifice to the cathode end (of course, what not use that other thing in the first place?).All my plating is of smaller items and I don't need more than three (3) volts to plate items. Generally, even one volt will do, so an old DIRECT CURRENT phone or other charger may do.

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  • Ribbed Handle Hiking Stick

    We gotta get you a draw knife.Nice job. Came here for the knots.

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  • Super Simple Band Saw Log Sled

    Thanks for the share.P.S. Yours is purtier than mine ;)

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  • Super Simple Band Saw Log Sled

    I'm tickled you built the jig and found it useful. I see mine showing up in more and more places, but you and our fellow Instructable member are the only ones I know of who have actually built and used it.

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  • Telescope Setting Circles

    I used to buy two part epoxy by the five gallon bucket to resin coat posters, prints, photos, magazine and newspaper clippings. I learned, very quickly, I had to seal items that would soak up the resin to keep from destroying them, such as when the printing on the opposite side bled through.I test drove a few things and found just common white glue, like Elmer's, sealed paper like news clippings and printer paper just fine. After sealing with white glue, I was able to coat the item in polyurethane and resin without the item being ruined by bleed through or the oil based finish or resin.

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  • KellyCraig made the instructable Bandsaw Boxes Made Easy
    Bandsaw Boxes Made Easy

    One of our pine trees was blown down about four years back, so the staked drawers on the left came out of it. The two are oval ones are just from a 4x4.

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  • Virtually Invisible Wood Putty for Any Species of Wood - Free!

    One of our pine trees was blown down about four years back, so the staked drawers on the left came out of it. The other two are just from a 4x4.

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  • Bandsaw Boxes Made Easy

    Ten years or so late, but NICE job, both on the ible and the project.

    You can use any wood you want.

    I bought a Carter Stabilizer for my 14" bandsaw. Rather than the stock five bearings on top and five on the bottom, it uses a single bearing on top and the blade rides in it. The Stabilizer is a game changer for work like this. With a good blade. I get nice, square cuts on 6" cherry.Since I have two bandsaws, I just leave the Stabilizer in place 24-7 and run either a 3/16" or 1/4" blade on it.My Stabilizer is for a Powermatic, but they make them for nearly every 14" saw out there. Their site will tell you if they have one for your saw. If not, they'll answer your questions.

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  • DIY Hydrogen Generator

    JUST GUESSING: You can buy platinum plated screens on line and they are fairly inexpensive. Avoid letting the wire touch the water. This should reduce the debris from the anode (I believe). You could use stainless (e.g., a bolt) for the cathode.[Welcome all info to the contrary to help the process]

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  • Separate Hydrogen and Oxygen From Water Through Electrolysis

    I've done quite a bit of copper plating of my wood turnings. This is done by: (1) Making a bath using sulfuric acid (e.g., car battery acid or the more potent drain cleaner), copper sulfate and distilled water. Commercial brightners can be added for dramatic result improvements.(2) Connecting the prepped wood turning (sealed and coated with conductive material) to the negative terminal, called the cathode, of a power supply and submerging it in the bath.(3) Connecting copper wire or bars to the positive terminal, called the anode.With power applied, the copper sulfate begins depositing on the cathode. At the same time, copper flows off the wire or bar, into the bath, replacing the copper pulled from the bath.In short, and mindful of the potential for explosions (my plating station uses …

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    I've done quite a bit of copper plating of my wood turnings. This is done by: (1) Making a bath using sulfuric acid (e.g., car battery acid or the more potent drain cleaner), copper sulfate and distilled water. Commercial brightners can be added for dramatic result improvements.(2) Connecting the prepped wood turning (sealed and coated with conductive material) to the negative terminal, called the cathode, of a power supply and submerging it in the bath.(3) Connecting copper wire or bars to the positive terminal, called the anode.With power applied, the copper sulfate begins depositing on the cathode. At the same time, copper flows off the wire or bar, into the bath, replacing the copper pulled from the bath.In short, and mindful of the potential for explosions (my plating station uses powered ventilation), it looks like swapping the copper anode for a platinum plated plate and dropping it down a PVC pipe suspended in a water bath could be fuel for some fun experiments, including hydrogenating water to see what it did for plants, if anything.Then there is the matter of experimenting with increased oxygen levels for plants or even around the home (again, mindful of explosion potentials and the negative impact of too much oxygen in our systems).

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  • Router Jig:  Wood Jar Lid Covers AND Coasters

    Thanks. If you see any omissions you think would help, please, let me know. Of course, the same goes with mistakes.

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  • Super Simple Band Saw Log Sled

    Often pieces have ends that aren't parallel, or are not flat. I'm thinking sacrificing a clamp, like a Bessy for it's increased bar strength, by welding points on the clamp so the face will not wander as the clamp is tightened.

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  • Bandsaw Circle Jig

    By adding a miter slot guide and setting up a stop you can drop the piece you are going to cut over the pin, then just run the table into the blade, until the jig stops, then start spinning the wood being cut. The circle jig needs to stop when the tooth of the blade is in line with the pin, or the blade will try to wander and havoc will break loose.This allows you to use any size wood and to avoid having to cut it to the dimensions of the circle before hand.

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  • Power in the Apocalypse (How to Build a Wood-Gasifier)

    I've long had an appreciation for things like gassifiers, and jet stoves. I figure the two go hand in hand because they both focus on efficient use of an ancient technology.With today's knowledge and technology, they should be more common, and even more practical than they were back when the U.S. government used gassifiers to power a fleet of vehicles.A seriously insulated structure with a couple energy efficient combustion systems should be very comfortable. Sadly, little wood stove has seen few honest improvements over the years. In fact, I was shocked to hear friends brag about only needing four cords of wood to heat their rather large homes. Back around 72, I heated an uninsulated, two story farm house off an antique stove with more controls than my modern car (okay, that might be a …

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    I've long had an appreciation for things like gassifiers, and jet stoves. I figure the two go hand in hand because they both focus on efficient use of an ancient technology.With today's knowledge and technology, they should be more common, and even more practical than they were back when the U.S. government used gassifiers to power a fleet of vehicles.A seriously insulated structure with a couple energy efficient combustion systems should be very comfortable. Sadly, little wood stove has seen few honest improvements over the years. In fact, I was shocked to hear friends brag about only needing four cords of wood to heat their rather large homes. Back around 72, I heated an uninsulated, two story farm house off an antique stove with more controls than my modern car (okay, that might be a slight exaggeration). I did it in a fifty below, Eastern Washington winter and on two cords (about a half cord of fir and the rest apple).Then there is the matter of my sisters complaint about her pellet stove - it's worthless without power. In fact, when I lived on the ocean beaches of the Pacific Northwet, I saw nearly new pellet stoves out in front of houses with free signs on them, just after a two week spell with no power to the area.I haven't done it, but for that solution, I figured one or two five gallon buckets of concrete would solve the problem. Using the method used to drive pendulum clocks, one could build a variable speed system that ran the auger around one RPM, or whatever such stoves require. To raise the buckets, a simple block and tackle system would allow even a kid to "charge the auger battery." I would not be surprised if the system would run a week between times the buckets had to be raised.Using jet stove and gassifier technology, then mixing in the auger feed technology, one should be able to run a pretty efficient household, even if the gassifier portion only produced enough power to run a chipper to fill the auger.One of the key points of both systems is, smoke should be nearly a non-issue, and one should be able to heat a well insulated structure with a fraction of the heat.SIDE NOTE: A house I rented on the Northewet ocean beaches had an open basement. I enclosed it and installed a wood burner in the basement. The solid concrete floors and walls acted like a heat flywheel. It took about three days to bring all the concrete up to a comfortable temp, but, once there, it took a couple days to cool too. The combo of heat and concrete made the basement quite comfortable. I imagine it would have been remarkable, had the concrete floor had foam under it and if the exterior of the walls had six inches of insulation on the outside.

    I forgot the "excellent job" part. Here it is: EXCELLENT JOB.Haven you gone down the fire brick / soap stone path for protection of the burn chambers yet? If not, look into those things and tie in water glass (sodium silicate). Soap stone is said to take about 1000 degrees more than common fire brick.I was told mixing water glass and talc, then baking it could create soap stone.When I look at forge an kiln linings, many of the cloth materials offered list sodium silicate.Too, look into diatomaceous earth. Here, there is a "mine" and we can go get free, broken bags of the stuff for projects and pest control. A few jet stoves use it to insulate between pipes.I believe some bags material sold in auto parts stores for clean up are just diatomaceous earth. That would be…

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    I forgot the "excellent job" part. Here it is: EXCELLENT JOB.Haven you gone down the fire brick / soap stone path for protection of the burn chambers yet? If not, look into those things and tie in water glass (sodium silicate). Soap stone is said to take about 1000 degrees more than common fire brick.I was told mixing water glass and talc, then baking it could create soap stone.When I look at forge an kiln linings, many of the cloth materials offered list sodium silicate.Too, look into diatomaceous earth. Here, there is a "mine" and we can go get free, broken bags of the stuff for projects and pest control. A few jet stoves use it to insulate between pipes.I believe some bags material sold in auto parts stores for clean up are just diatomaceous earth. That would be a lot cheaper than the bag my boss sent me to town to get twenty-five years ago. I paid twenty bucks for a one or two pound bag. Now I have a couple free, five gallon buckets sitting out in the shop.

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  • Large DIY Vibratory Tumbler

    Good stuff. If the 3-M goes too quick, look at horse mats. They're so thick and heavy they wouldn't need glue.

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  • What!?! Not Just 1, But 2 Projects!!!! Summer House and Natural Pool/plunge Pool

    The potential in your build is inspiring. The siding ("I ended up using sand, lime, dried nettles and cement") intrigues me a great deal.. Great job. I suspect we're going to get to see your carpentry skills grow in leaps and bounds.Thanks for sharing.It looks like the weak spot I noted is the supports, where they touch the ground. Oil impregnating them would more than double their life. I've seen posts rot away in damp ground in under five years.In the past, I've drilled holes down into wood, using a bit that allowed me to press some 1/4" or 3/8" diameter hose down into the holes. The hose went up into a can or tub filled with thinned oil. As the wood soaked up a batch, I'd just add more, until it seemed the wood wasn't absorbing any more over a period of a few da…

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    The potential in your build is inspiring. The siding ("I ended up using sand, lime, dried nettles and cement") intrigues me a great deal.. Great job. I suspect we're going to get to see your carpentry skills grow in leaps and bounds.Thanks for sharing.It looks like the weak spot I noted is the supports, where they touch the ground. Oil impregnating them would more than double their life. I've seen posts rot away in damp ground in under five years.In the past, I've drilled holes down into wood, using a bit that allowed me to press some 1/4" or 3/8" diameter hose down into the holes. The hose went up into a can or tub filled with thinned oil. As the wood soaked up a batch, I'd just add more, until it seemed the wood wasn't absorbing any more over a period of a few days.When done, I plugged the holes, to keep rain out, and moved to the next spot.Oil soaked wood will hold up to the elements for a long time.Anyway, enjoy your creation. Very creative and fun. I hop I get to look into the same, if only for a tool shed for what have you, on down the line.

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  • Shop Organization Tips and Practices

    In since 74 and the organization will go on until I quit going out to the shop. Many of my layout tools (stud finder, moisture meter, set up bards and rods, etc. have a custom holder. A couple walls have swinging, 1" thick panels I can hang things on, on either side (thus the (hollow) thickness. Because they swing, it's easy to get to both sides. They, essentially, double the wall space I had for layout tools, or chisels and carving knives.For example, the layout panels have things grouped. One side is all plexi and aluminum angle gauges, The opposite side is French curves and the like. The next panel is angle gauges, compasses, . . . .. One panel side is all straight edges, set up blocks, set up gauges, edge markers, rulers with stops, etc. An end panel has several tapes, speed …

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    In since 74 and the organization will go on until I quit going out to the shop. Many of my layout tools (stud finder, moisture meter, set up bards and rods, etc. have a custom holder. A couple walls have swinging, 1" thick panels I can hang things on, on either side (thus the (hollow) thickness. Because they swing, it's easy to get to both sides. They, essentially, double the wall space I had for layout tools, or chisels and carving knives.For example, the layout panels have things grouped. One side is all plexi and aluminum angle gauges, The opposite side is French curves and the like. The next panel is angle gauges, compasses, . . . .. One panel side is all straight edges, set up blocks, set up gauges, edge markers, rulers with stops, etc. An end panel has several tapes, speed sqares, L'squares, and custom multifunciton layout tools . Between each panel are things to big, long or that otherwise won't fit on a panel. Things like telescoping display stand les that lock and give me between measurements for the inside of cabinets, stairs and so on.

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  • Lawn Vacuum System Using Woodshop Equipment

    The black, funnel shaped thing on top of the blue barrel is what's called a cyclone. Everything drawn up through the hose is spun out before it gets to the impeller. That's why I use it in front of the collector. For that reason, nothing gets chopped up, only spun out.Without the cyclone, gravel, rocks and the hundreds of pine cones from our yard would go through the impeller blades, beating up on them. Too, that pair of aviator sun glasses that the four inch vacuum wand grabbed would still be wearable, being banged around in the hose aside.I don't use this for general yard clean up. Rather, I use it to vacuum pine cones, leaves out of the gardens and things off the gravel, such as paint chips. A mulcher would sound like world war two broke out if you tried to vacuum gravel and pine co…

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    The black, funnel shaped thing on top of the blue barrel is what's called a cyclone. Everything drawn up through the hose is spun out before it gets to the impeller. That's why I use it in front of the collector. For that reason, nothing gets chopped up, only spun out.Without the cyclone, gravel, rocks and the hundreds of pine cones from our yard would go through the impeller blades, beating up on them. Too, that pair of aviator sun glasses that the four inch vacuum wand grabbed would still be wearable, being banged around in the hose aside.I don't use this for general yard clean up. Rather, I use it to vacuum pine cones, leaves out of the gardens and things off the gravel, such as paint chips. A mulcher would sound like world war two broke out if you tried to vacuum gravel and pine cones. Without the cyclone, picking up knots and chips of wood off the floor result in flinchingly loud bangs, as they leave dents in the heavy metal of my collectors. As the noise would suggest, you would not be doing the impeller any favor. I note only the rare commercial unit use cyclones. People, including those ordering for cities and such, just don't know a lot about them.

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  • 3 Ways to Clean Paint Brushes

    To qualify the statement regarding plastics and paints, that only applies to other than water soluble paints. Water soluble paints, including the urethane acrylic types, play just fine with plastic shopping bags, kitchen wraps and zip lock type bags.I don't use little tubes of paint, I rely on one and five gallon buckets. Too, my brushes run about fifteen dollars each, so I want to take care of them (I have some that are twenty years old). Many painting projects require me to stop for the night and come back the next day to complete the job, or to get farther along on the job. In such cases, I don't want to clean my roller. Doing so can be VERY time consuming. In part that is because a coarse roller can hold a half pint to a point of paint NOTE: I wouldn't be without my spin…

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    To qualify the statement regarding plastics and paints, that only applies to other than water soluble paints. Water soluble paints, including the urethane acrylic types, play just fine with plastic shopping bags, kitchen wraps and zip lock type bags.I don't use little tubes of paint, I rely on one and five gallon buckets. Too, my brushes run about fifteen dollars each, so I want to take care of them (I have some that are twenty years old). Many painting projects require me to stop for the night and come back the next day to complete the job, or to get farther along on the job. In such cases, I don't want to clean my roller. Doing so can be VERY time consuming. In part that is because a coarse roller can hold a half pint to a point of paint NOTE: I wouldn't be without my spinners to spin the brushes and rollers after cleaning them.For some jobs, I clean my brushes throughout the day (once or twice) to keep them working at peak performance. Hot summer days make this more of a necessity, because paint builds up around the ferrule area. At the least, I like to clean it at the end of the day, when I am using it all day long.Sometimes the brush is fine and I just want to break for lunch. In those times and, again, if working with water soluble paints, I just wrap it in a shopping bag, or two.NOTE: NEVER throw away the cover your interior and exterior brushes come with. After you've shaken or spun out all the water, the cover shapes the brush, as it dries.

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  • Pressure Cooker Vacuum Chamber

    Occasionally, logs are hard to grasp using the stock, flat ends. Especially if the log is not cut 90 degrees to it's length.I was thinking of tweaking the clamp ends to give them more bite. Haven't decided if that will be via drilling three holes, 120 degrees apart, and then pressing nail ends or something else into them. Alternately, I might do some welds then grind them to look like a lathe drive center.

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  • Super Simple Band Saw Log Sled

    Thanks for posting the picture (Bessy clamp?).Glad this worked for you. Just used mine last week to run some cherry from one of the local orchards. My Rikon was thumping, even after several new blade swaps, so a few thick, short logs made for a good test material, after about a hundred tweaks (give or take fifty) of the lower wheel shaft.

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  • KellyCraig commented on Gammawave's instructable Barometric Mason Jar
    Barometric Mason Jar

    Short, sweet, simple, educational AND quite useful. Nice job, all the way around.

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  • Scratch-built CNC Router

    I've been eyeing CNC routers and lasers for nearly fifty years. Initially, getting one would have required talking the neighbor into letting me mortgage his house, along with mine and a couple others. CNC's have come a long way, as far as being within reach of hobby woodworkers, capability and practicability. Still, a decent commercial one isn't cheap, so I pondered building one too.The few consumer made CNC's I've read about were rather limited for my wants (I have a Radio Carver with a 4'x6' bed, so can make signs). Yours, I find inspiring. More so because you shared the details of problems you ran into and solved. Some of the electronics ones I recognized from my days of working for the Fed. They were common and we solved them same way you describe, or with shielded wire, for example.…

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    I've been eyeing CNC routers and lasers for nearly fifty years. Initially, getting one would have required talking the neighbor into letting me mortgage his house, along with mine and a couple others. CNC's have come a long way, as far as being within reach of hobby woodworkers, capability and practicability. Still, a decent commercial one isn't cheap, so I pondered building one too.The few consumer made CNC's I've read about were rather limited for my wants (I have a Radio Carver with a 4'x6' bed, so can make signs). Yours, I find inspiring. More so because you shared the details of problems you ran into and solved. Some of the electronics ones I recognized from my days of working for the Fed. They were common and we solved them same way you describe, or with shielded wire, for example.So, THANKS much for your efforts.

    Routers and CNC spindles are notorious dust and chip generators. My routers are the one tool in my shop that make the biggest mess of it. That said, I note the following exceptions:(1) My router table, which has dust collection at the fence and at the router cover under the table, may only leave a tablespoon of dust on the top, even though the work might result in filling a five gallon can with dust and chips.(2) Occasionally, I am able to use my sanding station for router work, including long boards I am able to fit through the sides or back. Because it has two sides, a back and a top (nylon cloth) around a down draft table, all the air drawn in by the dust collector comes from the front, so nearly all the dust and most of the chips are captured in the station.(3) I am able to position…

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    Routers and CNC spindles are notorious dust and chip generators. My routers are the one tool in my shop that make the biggest mess of it. That said, I note the following exceptions:(1) My router table, which has dust collection at the fence and at the router cover under the table, may only leave a tablespoon of dust on the top, even though the work might result in filling a five gallon can with dust and chips.(2) Occasionally, I am able to use my sanding station for router work, including long boards I am able to fit through the sides or back. Because it has two sides, a back and a top (nylon cloth) around a down draft table, all the air drawn in by the dust collector comes from the front, so nearly all the dust and most of the chips are captured in the station.(3) I am able to position a 4" dust collection hose near the trim router my Radio Carver uses to duplicate items off templates or other items like violins, gun stocks and so on.Each of the above tie to one of my 3 horse, "four bag" dust collectors. Obviously, the combination does a wonderful job. Since moving a four inch hose around a table would put a lot of load on the stepper motors, I wonder if an alternative would be using the approach I did for my sanding station. That would mean building a "box" around the CNC just tall enough to allow the moving head to clear. It could be as simple to make as using 4 mil, clear plastic (versus the heavy nylon I use for my sanding station). Collector to ports at the bottom, near the work area would reduce dust problems greatly and may even contribute to system cooling.

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  • Large DIY Vibratory Tumbler

    Would love to see a before and after photo of what you tumbled with this.Nice job. Nice in fact and deed.

    Must have been a cup of coffee short of awake when I went through your ible (don't know how I missed that video).Thanks. After watching it, your build is all the more impressive. It'd be fun to see what finer media would do with something. Perhaps even sand, though one would want to control the silica dust issue with such things.In time, I assume the media would take a toll on the container, just as cleaning metal parts in a sonic cleaner does.Since you vibrate mechanically, it would seem even using silicone caulk to hold metal panels over the surfaces of the tub may not pose too much of a dampening problem.

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  • DIY Textured Cement-Styrofoam Planter

    Curious about examples of the differences in weight (straight concrete vs concrete with 50% Styrofoam). Any ideas?Regardless, looks like a fun project with a lot of possibilities, including he towel type planters seen elsewhere.Too, it'd be interesting to see how treating the finished concrete with waterglass (sodium silicate) would affect durability, since it's said to react with the cement and make it more durability. Of course, there are other, commercial concrete treatments (as you suggest) that would protect this investment in time.Good ible, by the way.

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  • Recycled Cork Backsplash

    IF you know someone with a bandsaw, you can cut a hundred corks, safely, in about twenty minutes or less. I wrote and instructable on it and it's posted here:https://www.instructables.com/Cutting-Wine-Bott...Nice job, on the instructable and the project.

    You can run a tape to the wall and make a mark at ten (10) inches. Then measure over from the other wall to that mark, then add the ten inches to that reading.An alternate method, which I use often, is using a measuring gauge. A gauge can be made, for example, using two or more pieces of thin scrap wood (like aluminum or wood yard sticks) and some hot glue or other means of securing them together, like duct tape.Think of them in terms of being end to end on the wall, but overlapping each other, so the glue or tape has enough material to hold the pieces where you placed them. Do this until they cover wall to wall. You should do this at the top and bottom, because walls are almost never square.For each measurment, move the measuring tool to your wood and make the appropriate marks.Because …

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    You can run a tape to the wall and make a mark at ten (10) inches. Then measure over from the other wall to that mark, then add the ten inches to that reading.An alternate method, which I use often, is using a measuring gauge. A gauge can be made, for example, using two or more pieces of thin scrap wood (like aluminum or wood yard sticks) and some hot glue or other means of securing them together, like duct tape.Think of them in terms of being end to end on the wall, but overlapping each other, so the glue or tape has enough material to hold the pieces where you placed them. Do this until they cover wall to wall. You should do this at the top and bottom, because walls are almost never square.For each measurment, move the measuring tool to your wood and make the appropriate marks.Because walls are rarely plumb, and if you aren't gong to frame your project, you would do well to set a try or L square on the wall you're working and not if there is a gap at the top or bottom. You would measure the gap and add it to your plan. For example, if you measure the left wall and note a 1/8" gap at the bottom, you would move your top mark to the right 1/8".In a pinch, a belt sander is a perfect, though messy tool for scribbing to a line when working counter tops.

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  • Pressure Cooker Vacuum Chamber

    That has some potential and would solve the problem of the plastic being crazed by the stabilizing gases.

    I'm with those who say it shouldn't matter that a drill press is used for woodworking. With rare exceptions, any drill press you run across was designed for metal working. One exception I know of is a Powermatic unit, but the design changes are only to make it more handy for woodworking projects. Mechanically, even it would not be affected by being used for metal work all day long.The worst that would happen would be, you forgot to change the speed, or you might have forgotten to clean off all the metal debris.

    Just went on a search for better solutions that a chunk of plastic for the lid sparked by the suggestion of a cake dome. The rabbit trails let to glass lazy Susans, MICROWAVE TURNTABLES....Of course, you can just search for, for example, "15" round tempered glass plate."

    Many chambers have the gauges and such mounted in the sides, so they don't have to drill the glass tops.First, unlike plastics, the glass will not fracture, when subjected to certain off gasses, such as the gas of Cactus Juice used for stabilizing wood.As to the location of the holes for gauges, it shouldn't matter, IF you put the product in another container, which you should be doing to avoid an insane cleanup project.

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  • Pimp Your Vacuum Sealer

    For those who fall victim to experimentation, consider picking up nebulizers when you find them at garage sales. The old ones could be converted from compressors to vacuum pumps by pulling the cover and swapping the hose to the input side of the compressor.I used one in conjunction with one of the variable temp sealers, to allow me to seal other than just proprietary bags. I've, also, had a lot of success using a household vacuum.I made a over sized food saver type vacuum chamber using scraps of Corian. The first layer was a solid, rectangular piece long enough to take on the biggest bags. It was ABOUT 4" x 16". Above the first piece and welded to it was a similar piece, but which had I had cut the center out of, leaving ABOUT 1/2" of the border. I used common, foam do…

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    For those who fall victim to experimentation, consider picking up nebulizers when you find them at garage sales. The old ones could be converted from compressors to vacuum pumps by pulling the cover and swapping the hose to the input side of the compressor.I used one in conjunction with one of the variable temp sealers, to allow me to seal other than just proprietary bags. I've, also, had a lot of success using a household vacuum.I made a over sized food saver type vacuum chamber using scraps of Corian. The first layer was a solid, rectangular piece long enough to take on the biggest bags. It was ABOUT 4" x 16". Above the first piece and welded to it was a similar piece, but which had I had cut the center out of, leaving ABOUT 1/2" of the border. I used common, foam door gasket around the cut out, to get a seal.A third piece served as a lid, with hinges. I used 1/2" thick poly, because I had it, but more Corian would do.A hole into the cut out [center] piece allowed me to plug the vacuum hose in.

    P.S. Thanks for the liquid tip to keep the vacuum pump safe.Hmm. This sparks all kinds of ideas for vacuum dehydrating.....

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  • How to Make a Vacuum Chamber

    I don't have an end mill, but do have an over-arm-pin-router. Like an end mill, it carves from the top, but has no problem with plunge cutting.If the item being cut were on a lazy Susan and the router were supported over the project, like a pin router, a groove could be carved into the poly using a router and just spinning the acrylic.Alternately, a center pin hole would allow one to spin the poly so a table mounted router accomplished the same thing.Finally, and the easiest for most would be to just make a new router base that extended, say, twelve inches. Once the router was mounted, you would only need to measure from where the bit lands to the other end for the center pivot, then using that center pilot hole, you could spin the router to cut a circular groove.

    P.S. Thanks for the ible, and for reminding us we can get out of the box to solve a problem, build a VERY handy tool and save money doing it.

    I used to make coffee tables that required oval, rectangular and other shapes. I would have the glass company cut the shapes for me based off templates I made for them. It's not as expensive as one might think and, of course, the glass will not be prone to cracking or crazing in reaction to the off gas of things like Cactus Juice used for stabilizing wood.A peek at many stabilizing systems reveals some companies punch holes near the top of the can to install gauges and air ports, but the glass company may be able to drill holes in your glass to give you an alternative.

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  • Laminate Mixed Media Bangle

    I have tons of wood and few hundred pounds of acrylics. I've been laminating the plastics between pieces of walnut, koa, mahogany, acacia, sycamore and cherry or apple. The results are great looking, but the occasional drop or high temps the item suffers being stored in my non-climate controlled storage has resulted in numerous separations.I've used both my 1:1 and 2:1 epoxies and commercial "Super glue." Laminations with the latter actually seem a bit more reliable.I've even gone so far as to sand with 60 grit and grind the clear acrylics for better grip, since the epoxies fill well and dry clear. Even that does not guarantee a dependable joint.I am going to look into the West system. In the end, it seems the best bet would be something which, like the cyro glues, softens and …

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    I have tons of wood and few hundred pounds of acrylics. I've been laminating the plastics between pieces of walnut, koa, mahogany, acacia, sycamore and cherry or apple. The results are great looking, but the occasional drop or high temps the item suffers being stored in my non-climate controlled storage has resulted in numerous separations.I've used both my 1:1 and 2:1 epoxies and commercial "Super glue." Laminations with the latter actually seem a bit more reliable.I've even gone so far as to sand with 60 grit and grind the clear acrylics for better grip, since the epoxies fill well and dry clear. Even that does not guarantee a dependable joint.I am going to look into the West system. In the end, it seems the best bet would be something which, like the cyro glues, softens and locks into the surface of the plastic would be the best bet.Have you experimented with any other glues?

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  • Wooden Cream Cheese Knife

    I've made several butter knives and such, but not like this. You can be sure I'm stealing this idea.NICE JOB, both on the project and the Instructable.

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  • End Grain Cutting Boards From Scrap Wood How-To

    You do not need to slather on mineral oil, wipe it off, then slather on more. It just wastes mineral oil.Apply a generous amount of oil to wood. Add more wherever it soaked in. When it quits soaking in quickly, make sure it has a good layer of oil, then walk away.If that layer soaked in when you get back to the item in an hour or so, add more and let it set for about twenty-four hours or even more. Only then do you need to wipe off the excess.You put a lot of work into the project, so what's another day?I bought an old butcher block on the cheap because it had cracks and separations from drying out over the years. I used the technique above, then walked away for a couple weeks. When I came back, the oil had all wicked in the wood. The effect of replacing the lost moisture was, the wood …

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    You do not need to slather on mineral oil, wipe it off, then slather on more. It just wastes mineral oil.Apply a generous amount of oil to wood. Add more wherever it soaked in. When it quits soaking in quickly, make sure it has a good layer of oil, then walk away.If that layer soaked in when you get back to the item in an hour or so, add more and let it set for about twenty-four hours or even more. Only then do you need to wipe off the excess.You put a lot of work into the project, so what's another day?I bought an old butcher block on the cheap because it had cracks and separations from drying out over the years. I used the technique above, then walked away for a couple weeks. When I came back, the oil had all wicked in the wood. The effect of replacing the lost moisture was, the wood swelled to its original state and all the cracks and splits disappeared.

    Now, about using a planer for cleaning up end grain - DON'T.As has been said by several professionals, just because you got away with it a few times does not mean you always will.When a planer gets into a fight with the end grain, it can go really bad. The wood can, literally, explode. When it does, it can destroy the planer, obviously the project and can even injure the operator.Even though my spiral cutting heads to a remarkable jog of figured wood with wild wood grain, it's still a debatable match for something that is all end grain.If you doubt the danger of running end grain through a planer, do a simple Net search using words like "planer end grain explosion."

    Vegetable oil, certainly, does go rancid. Note that no pro uses it for kitchen utensils or boards.Walnut oil is a hardening oil. It does the same thing tung or boiled linseed oil (treated flax seed oil) does. It polymerizes, so builds up over time.You want to use non-hardening oils for wooden spoons, spurtles and cutting boards. That is why every commercial product for these uses have a base of mineral oil. They might ad beeswax or even carnuba, but for things like butcher blocks, straight mineral oil is the go to oil.Many use olive oil, thinking they are taking a healthy approach, but the oil will go rancid and the wood develops a smell.

    Too, it is a hardening oil, so it's like applying tung oil or boiled linseed oil over time. We don't want surface coats on things like this though.

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  • Wall Mounted Bike Repair Stand With Heavy Duty Clamp

    I don't even own a bike and had to check this out because is was cool. Good job.

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  • Mini Hydrogen Generator

    Merely that something is written does not make it libel. If it's factual or satirical, a legal challenge going down that road could earn CR11 (civil rules of court) sanctions for a frivolous claim.Just so you know.

    Let's see, some guy whose only Instructables achievements seem to be a hundred or so troll like comments on other people's posts types "[s]illy comment," then goes on to type silly comments, before making ludicrous comments.Maybe you're playing dumb. Of course, it may be sincere. The content and context of your post only offers suggestions. That aside, you mentioned chlorine. Inasmuch as you indicate yourself to be far more knowledgeable than some or all those who come here to learn and share, you could have taken the opportunity to mention chlorine can be a result of adding salt to water during the electrolysis processes. You could have explained how those of us who do metal plating concern ourselves with what goes into the plating bath for that and other reasons. You, howeve…

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    Let's see, some guy whose only Instructables achievements seem to be a hundred or so troll like comments on other people's posts types "[s]illy comment," then goes on to type silly comments, before making ludicrous comments.Maybe you're playing dumb. Of course, it may be sincere. The content and context of your post only offers suggestions. That aside, you mentioned chlorine. Inasmuch as you indicate yourself to be far more knowledgeable than some or all those who come here to learn and share, you could have taken the opportunity to mention chlorine can be a result of adding salt to water during the electrolysis processes. You could have explained how those of us who do metal plating concern ourselves with what goes into the plating bath for that and other reasons. You, however, did not, so may not know. Since you didn't know, were so consumed with rage against those who didn't, or just have a great deal of trouble typing even a single line, I'll say it for you: Adding salt to water to which an electrical charge is applied can produce the chlorine gas you mentioned.Regarding your statement "i]f it's taken five years to get round to compose that rubbish. . . .," are you really unaware Net and Instructable searches are purposed to produce results, and those results often lead to, for example, five year old comments, like yours? If that simple fact is difficult for you to understand, do some experimentation with the search processes, or have someone explain it to you in finer detail.Of course, it's possible you attach more importance to yourself than does the rest of the world, and actually believe I or someone else would spend five years working on a response to your rambling response. Be advised, that is not the case. Until the date of my post, I and most the world knew nothing of you. It may be life was more pleasant for both of us that way.

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  • Killing Algae Growing on a Wooden Deck Using Hydrogen Peroxide

    We used sodium percarbonate we bought in 40# bags to clean sidewalks and such. Mixed with water it produces hydrogen peroxide and soda ash (washing soda) a mild caustic cleaner. We found it worked best with used with warm water.Just for reference, we are, essentially, talking about the contents of things like "Oxy Clean."

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  • How to Assemble a HHO Generator and Why It Works

    To those knowledgeable on these matters, just some questions to help us move past the silver carburetor, or to inspire new paths of investigation.About forty-five years ago, I had a little motorcycle that would top end on the Brewster (Washington) flats at about 75 mph on a hot summer day. Later in the day, after a short cloud burst, that bike would top at or near the 100 mph.Comes the question from the foregoing, was the cooler weather responsible for the higher speed? Was the higher humidity a contributing factor. Was it the combination>Years after those days, many of us started playing with water vapor injection systems. I'd never heard of Browns Gas or hydrogen-oxygen injection. Anyway, I had a 69 short-bed, step-side pickup with a six cylinder. My goal was to break 30 mpg. Keep…

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    To those knowledgeable on these matters, just some questions to help us move past the silver carburetor, or to inspire new paths of investigation.About forty-five years ago, I had a little motorcycle that would top end on the Brewster (Washington) flats at about 75 mph on a hot summer day. Later in the day, after a short cloud burst, that bike would top at or near the 100 mph.Comes the question from the foregoing, was the cooler weather responsible for the higher speed? Was the higher humidity a contributing factor. Was it the combination>Years after those days, many of us started playing with water vapor injection systems. I'd never heard of Browns Gas or hydrogen-oxygen injection. Anyway, I had a 69 short-bed, step-side pickup with a six cylinder. My goal was to break 30 mpg. Keep in mind, the truck had a 4:13 rear end and a 3 speed on the column. To improve mileage, I did many alterations: I swapped the stock 3 speed for a 3 speed out of a 60's Chev wagon, with over drive; I played with the cam; I installed headers; I installed an air dam; and, I played with the carburetor (e.g., minutely over size the jet to address a flat spot from the increased air flow caused by alteration of the exhaust and intake (cam). It's been so long I do not remember all the details on the vapor injection, but mine relied on vacuum and atmospheric pressure. Though the port to atmosphere was small, it was obvious vapor made it to the venturi of the single barrel carb.I believe some of the thinking, regarding vapor injection, was it worked like octane boosters, and kept the engine more clean from carbon. Keep in mind, this was around the time octanes were dropping, even as some new cars called for higher levels.The point of the above is, while a single thing, alone, may not give the effect sought, one must wonder how its interaction with other things affects performance.Of course, there are many variables to consider, such as, increased loads on alternators produce drag on the engine that will, negatively, affect mileage.Then there are the days, about eight decades back, when people used gassifiers to generate fuel to move fleets of trucks (which were far from quarter milers, but moved, nonetheless. An enterprising Pacific Northwet shingle mill owner even ran a large duct from a partially filled gas tank to a modified carb system to get his rig down the road. It was slow to get up to speed, but it got him the forty-five miles to town and back.

    Don't forget to factor in the drag on the alternator, as more load is imposed on it.

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  • Mini Hydrogen Generator

    If you're going down that road, explain the difference between using soda vs salt. Don't leave everyone hanging (wondering what you're talking about). Use your vast knowledge to give some helpful details.

    Others more learned than I am say, don't use salt. That is how you make chlorine gas. Stay with the soda.

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  • Separate Hydrogen and Oxygen From Water Through Electrolysis

    Oh sure, daddyo, next thing I know, you're going to tell me they're debating whether electricity flows positive to negative or negative to positive.I guess we better quit writing in stone. It's so hard to erase.In the end, I cannot say you or the plastic hot rod are right, or wrong. I will say it's sad nothing significant has been done with carburation in a hundred years. Throttle body are just design change and did little for performance and economy. Fuel injection, yeah, little bit.In the end, the mileage of vehicles is stupid bad. My VW square back I had in the 70's did regular thirties for mpg. Fifty years later, with all the thinking power (computing) power we have today and the best we can do is fifty with a diesel engine on a tiny car. That's beyond sad.Back around 72, my motorcycl…

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    Oh sure, daddyo, next thing I know, you're going to tell me they're debating whether electricity flows positive to negative or negative to positive.I guess we better quit writing in stone. It's so hard to erase.In the end, I cannot say you or the plastic hot rod are right, or wrong. I will say it's sad nothing significant has been done with carburation in a hundred years. Throttle body are just design change and did little for performance and economy. Fuel injection, yeah, little bit.In the end, the mileage of vehicles is stupid bad. My VW square back I had in the 70's did regular thirties for mpg. Fifty years later, with all the thinking power (computing) power we have today and the best we can do is fifty with a diesel engine on a tiny car. That's beyond sad.Back around 72, my motorcycle would do about 75 on the Brewster (Washignton) flats on a hot summer day. The same flats and motor cycle, during a light rain, would break 90 to a hundred mph.How much of the improved top end was due to cooling and how much due to water vapor on the intake, I don't know. I do know there are always many more variables to be looked at for a given matter than most presume, including the "experts."While a bit of a rabbit trail, we do know vehicles were, literally, ran off fumes in hard times. They weren't quarter milers, but they got people to and from points.

    Keep in mind, 3-M / NASA / BANGOR / PSNS / etc. engineers did not invent everything. Many an item was developed by individuals lacking credentials and in less than ideal conditions.I have no degrees. My schooling has been minimal. Still, things I studied are significant in number and breadth. Though I lacked credentials like you describe, the federal government used hundreds of my procedures and ideas to solve problems, or to improve efficiency. Engineers at Keyport, Washington, assigned me many projects and had me effect repairs to complex electronics systems. Though I never went to school for it, they even called on my to do drafting [pre-CAD] for them.Having worked with MANY engineers on many projects, I can say, with certainty, while intelligent, some can be comedy relief in other t…

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    Keep in mind, 3-M / NASA / BANGOR / PSNS / etc. engineers did not invent everything. Many an item was developed by individuals lacking credentials and in less than ideal conditions.I have no degrees. My schooling has been minimal. Still, things I studied are significant in number and breadth. Though I lacked credentials like you describe, the federal government used hundreds of my procedures and ideas to solve problems, or to improve efficiency. Engineers at Keyport, Washington, assigned me many projects and had me effect repairs to complex electronics systems. Though I never went to school for it, they even called on my to do drafting [pre-CAD] for them.Having worked with MANY engineers on many projects, I can say, with certainty, while intelligent, some can be comedy relief in other than their SPECIFIC area of expertise. As well, I can say, with no uncertainty, outright dismissing someone because they have not been recognized by some school can be a fool's errand.Those things aside, and regarding your responses, are you factoring in the changes in the efficiency of rapid oxidation (firing) of fuel when changes are made to it or things added to it, such as we see when octane levels are changed? What would happen if a minute amount of water vapor was introduced, as might apply to my description of the performance of my motorcycle, and when hydrogen and oxygen re-combine?What could we see if just oxygen was introduced to fuel (as suggested elsewhere)? We know a simple cigar can be made into a cutting torch using pure oxygen. Again, what, when we introduce hydrogen and oxygen.Perhaps, rather than getting insulted, and insulting. we'd be more valuable, both to ourselves and others, if we shared ideas to help others avoid known pitfalls, or what have you.

    I was just considering making a simple generator. Long ago, I had contemplated using an aquarium with a plate across the middle to separate the sides, with a gap at the bottom.An aquarium would take a lot of room when my shop is already filled with everything from plating stations to over-arm pin routers and dust collectors. This morning it flashed through my mind the same effect could be done using a gallon jar and a smaller quart jar, or a PVC pipe, either which would fit in the gallon jar, have the bottoms open, be submerged in water, and have lids with holes through which exhaust/collection pipes would protrude and through which the anode and cathode could be submerged.

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  • Tyre Bowl- Basic Bowl Turning

    I'd never touched a lathe in my life (I'm almost 70), now I have four (okay, I upgraded and got some killer deals, so I'm in the process of selling two or three). That world really is a vortex.Now the interesting part - all my work has been spindle work, with exception of four bowls. Let's face it, it's a whole lot easier to do spindle work than bowls, vases and boxes.With the new Nova, I figured I'd better take another stab at bowls. Especially since I live in orchard country and have stacks of crotch wood and such.Anyway, in the course of picking up tips to avoid catches [and excitement], I came here. One point I was looking for was, and riding the bevel aside, where to land the tip when starting into hollowing the bowl. That is, should the tool rest be lower than center point enough t…

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    I'd never touched a lathe in my life (I'm almost 70), now I have four (okay, I upgraded and got some killer deals, so I'm in the process of selling two or three). That world really is a vortex.Now the interesting part - all my work has been spindle work, with exception of four bowls. Let's face it, it's a whole lot easier to do spindle work than bowls, vases and boxes.With the new Nova, I figured I'd better take another stab at bowls. Especially since I live in orchard country and have stacks of crotch wood and such.Anyway, in the course of picking up tips to avoid catches [and excitement], I came here. One point I was looking for was, and riding the bevel aside, where to land the tip when starting into hollowing the bowl. That is, should the tool rest be lower than center point enough the tip can run at center or below, or should cuts be above center point?

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  • KellyCraig commented on jef400dread's instructable Rocket Stove V3
    Rocket Stove V3

    Robert, my old house in Bremerton, Washington, was one of those with a fancy, nickle plated top, front and sides. On a whim, I got some fire bricks, a piece of heavy gauge metal, some of the door seal rope and glue. I lined the bottom with the bricks, stuck the metal in so it rounded over the top of the fire and forced the fire to roll around the edges, before wandering up the chimney.I glued the front door and the lift off burners shut, sealing them off, to give me more control over air flow. Finally, I added the door gasket.For the few times power went out, this made the otherwise rather inefficient stove much more efficient. Later, on a whim, I added several bricks to the top, in an attempt to get a bit of a flywheel effect. That helped too. Anything that gave the heat something to r…

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    Robert, my old house in Bremerton, Washington, was one of those with a fancy, nickle plated top, front and sides. On a whim, I got some fire bricks, a piece of heavy gauge metal, some of the door seal rope and glue. I lined the bottom with the bricks, stuck the metal in so it rounded over the top of the fire and forced the fire to roll around the edges, before wandering up the chimney.I glued the front door and the lift off burners shut, sealing them off, to give me more control over air flow. Finally, I added the door gasket.For the few times power went out, this made the otherwise rather inefficient stove much more efficient. Later, on a whim, I added several bricks to the top, in an attempt to get a bit of a flywheel effect. That helped too. Anything that gave the heat something to radiate off of during operation.The Net didn't exist back then. Today, it would jet stove all the way.

    If I were to make a huge modification to an efficient stove like this, it would be an auger to feed fuel. Since I would be using in the absence of power, it would be a mechanically operated auger. The design for the workings of the auger would take a page from a cuckoo clock or grandfather clock page. The weights would be one or more five gallon bucket of concrete raised by way of a pulley system so even a small child could raise them. A rough calibration should have the thing running fairly reliably for hours at a time, allowing the operator to get a warm nights sleep.The unit could be fired by pellets, corn or chunks of wood but to a small enough size the auger could handle them (I have a woodshop with a couple bandsaws).The auger would dump the material in a sealed chute, which coul…

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    If I were to make a huge modification to an efficient stove like this, it would be an auger to feed fuel. Since I would be using in the absence of power, it would be a mechanically operated auger. The design for the workings of the auger would take a page from a cuckoo clock or grandfather clock page. The weights would be one or more five gallon bucket of concrete raised by way of a pulley system so even a small child could raise them. A rough calibration should have the thing running fairly reliably for hours at a time, allowing the operator to get a warm nights sleep.The unit could be fired by pellets, corn or chunks of wood but to a small enough size the auger could handle them (I have a woodshop with a couple bandsaws).The auger would dump the material in a sealed chute, which could even have a tempered glass view port, to monitor blockage.A couple "fool proof" safeties could be built in to insure the unit never developed a backfire up the feed tube, or, if it did, it would just burn out and exhaust into the regular stack.Of course, it would have the option of a regular feed too.

    Here, in the Northwest (actually Central Washington). we have mountains of diatomaceous earth. I think it would make a great replacement for the Perlite. Especially since I can get it free.Another thing to look into, after you've perfected your build, is water glass (sodium silicate). If you look around, you'll find it as one of the ingredients in Castable Refractory Cement used in forges and such.If memory serves, a fire brick is good for about 2,000 degrees, but a soapstone block is good for about 3,000. A soapstone wannabe is said to be doable by way of a baked mix of talk and water glass.

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  • Resurfacing Cast Iron Pans

    As to refinishing cast iron pans, I know of no one who took smoothing of a pan to the mirror finish level, but I doubt doing so would, in any way, ruin the pan.I could be wrong.As I see it, based on my significant experience polishing everything from resin and plastic to aluminum, brass and iron, at worst, you'd only have to scrub the pan to remove the coating, then let water do it's rust thing, just enough to take the shine off the surface, then remove the rust. Or you could just run over it with 320 to 600 sandpaper.On my table saw, which I confess to having used less than very little for cooking, I used some of my granite polishing diamond pads to produce a final finish you could see your reflection in. In spite of that rather smooth surface, I have no difficulty apply protective coat…

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    As to refinishing cast iron pans, I know of no one who took smoothing of a pan to the mirror finish level, but I doubt doing so would, in any way, ruin the pan.I could be wrong.As I see it, based on my significant experience polishing everything from resin and plastic to aluminum, brass and iron, at worst, you'd only have to scrub the pan to remove the coating, then let water do it's rust thing, just enough to take the shine off the surface, then remove the rust. Or you could just run over it with 320 to 600 sandpaper.On my table saw, which I confess to having used less than very little for cooking, I used some of my granite polishing diamond pads to produce a final finish you could see your reflection in. In spite of that rather smooth surface, I have no difficulty apply protective coatings to the surface.Older pans came machined to a surface similar to the table top of my cabinet saws. That is, very smooth, though you can still see the machining marks. Generally, newer pans, by comparison, are like the one in this Instructable - very bumpy. Too, if pans are not taken to or almost to a mirror finish (with softened (rounded over) edges), they are a danger to glass top or ceramic stove tops.

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  • Resurfacing Cast Iron Pans

    Keep in mind, seasoning is not full on armor. If it were, we could wash the pans in soapy water, like other kitchen ware. As said by Scott, a release agent is a good thing. Even silicone molds benefit from silicone sprays. Here, butter is good ;)

    HUGESee my posts.

    I don't know, so am open to new information. Is my torch or the other heat polymerizing the oil or lard, or is it carbonizing it?Generally, polymerization is accomplished by way of reaction with oxygen, at least with "boiled" linseed oil, walnut oil, tung oil and anything else that hardens by way of reaction with oxygen.

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