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27CommentsJoined December 11th, 2013
Retired disabled firefighter.
  • Kuffar commented on nick ferry's instructable How to Make Styrofoam Look Like Brick1 year ago
    How to Make Styrofoam Look Like Brick

    Really good looking! You'd be surprised to find out, that this stuff is used in commercial buildings. I used to be a firefighter, and, of all buildings, we had a run to a bank building, that was hit by a car. It was halfway inside the lobby. The wall the car struck, was made of metal studs and glorified styrofoam, with a 1/4" coating of textured concrete, to make it look like stone. Obviously the car wasn't going very fast, because I could have walked through the wall. It was a fairly new building, but I could imagine someone leaning on the wall, smoking a cigarette, and ending up on their butt, inside the lobby. One more thing; if you use styrofoam for a wall covering, remember, it is extremely combustible. Once lit, which is very easy, it burns like gasoline, and creates a hu...

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    Really good looking! You'd be surprised to find out, that this stuff is used in commercial buildings. I used to be a firefighter, and, of all buildings, we had a run to a bank building, that was hit by a car. It was halfway inside the lobby. The wall the car struck, was made of metal studs and glorified styrofoam, with a 1/4" coating of textured concrete, to make it look like stone. Obviously the car wasn't going very fast, because I could have walked through the wall. It was a fairly new building, but I could imagine someone leaning on the wall, smoking a cigarette, and ending up on their butt, inside the lobby. One more thing; if you use styrofoam for a wall covering, remember, it is extremely combustible. Once lit, which is very easy, it burns like gasoline, and creates a huge amount of choking smoke.

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  • Kuffar commented on the tat2artist's instructable Make Your Own Teepee1 year ago
    Make Your Own  Teepee

    Sorry, I guess I confused someone, when I put the "18 by my count" in parentheses. That was to say, there were at least 18 stripes on the bunting. NOT, that there were 18 stripes, thus colonies, on an American flag. I didn't mean to confuse the millennials. ?

    Sorry, I guess I confused someone, when I put the "18 by my count" in parentheses. That was to say, there were at least 18 stripes on the bunting. NOT, that there were 18 stripes, thus colonies, on an American flag. I didn't mean to confuse the millennials. ?

    Sorry, I guess I confused someone, when I put the "18 by my count" in parentheses. That was to say, there were at least 18 stripes on the bunting. NOT, that there were 18 stripes, thus colonies, on an American flag. I didn't mean to confuse the millennials. ?

    Sorry, I guess I confused someone, when I put the "18 by my count" in parentheses. That was to say, there were at least 18 stripes on the bunting. NOT, that there were 18 stripes, thus colonies, on an American flag. I didn't mean to confuse the millennials. ?

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  • Kuffar commented on hacknbuild's instructable Build a Honey Bee Bait Hive2 years ago
    Build a Honey Bee Bait Hive

    I tried making some mead. Check out what yeast to use. I just used some bread yeast, and had some uncapped honey, I needed to do something with. I forget which yeast is for mead. I think it was D47, but check. There is also a book, "How to Make Mead Like a Viking", that is informative and entertaining. We have a honey festival nearby, and tried some of their mead. Yup! Tastes just like my gasoline. If you back sweeten it, it's much better. Get with a bee club in your area, you can get some good ideas from other beeks. I don't know what state you are in, but I found out, my second year, that I was supposed to register my hives with the state. It's normally $5.00, per apiary, where I am, in Ohio. The inspector comes out once a year, and sends you an inspection certificate. ...

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    I tried making some mead. Check out what yeast to use. I just used some bread yeast, and had some uncapped honey, I needed to do something with. I forget which yeast is for mead. I think it was D47, but check. There is also a book, "How to Make Mead Like a Viking", that is informative and entertaining. We have a honey festival nearby, and tried some of their mead. Yup! Tastes just like my gasoline. If you back sweeten it, it's much better. Get with a bee club in your area, you can get some good ideas from other beeks. I don't know what state you are in, but I found out, my second year, that I was supposed to register my hives with the state. It's normally $5.00, per apiary, where I am, in Ohio. The inspector comes out once a year, and sends you an inspection certificate. They are trying to keep an eye on varroa, and other diseases. It's also supposed to be in a database, for crop sprayers, to be careful too. The goofball around here, evidently can't read, or has been drinking the roundup.

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  • Kuffar commented on hacknbuild's instructable Build a Honey Bee Bait Hive2 years ago
    Build a Honey Bee Bait Hive

    I built a similar one of these 3 or 4 years ago, when I decided to try beekeeping. My design is basically an 8 frame, with a little extra room underneath. I caught my first swarm within a week. I still have my original hive, plus a few more. The next summer, I got 2, from the same tree. My trap has been pretty reliable, even though it's cheap plywood. The dancing girls don't seem to mind. Glad to see an Instructable, on these. New beekeepers have been brainwashed into thinking that you have to buy bees. The local feral bees are usually healthier, used to the climate, and seem to be pretty docile. Did I mention, free? Several of my friends have had $300.00 fly away in a day or two. One guy no longer does bees, after two years of buying disappearing bees. Another, lost his hives to a fl...

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    I built a similar one of these 3 or 4 years ago, when I decided to try beekeeping. My design is basically an 8 frame, with a little extra room underneath. I caught my first swarm within a week. I still have my original hive, plus a few more. The next summer, I got 2, from the same tree. My trap has been pretty reliable, even though it's cheap plywood. The dancing girls don't seem to mind. Glad to see an Instructable, on these. New beekeepers have been brainwashed into thinking that you have to buy bees. The local feral bees are usually healthier, used to the climate, and seem to be pretty docile. Did I mention, free? Several of my friends have had $300.00 fly away in a day or two. One guy no longer does bees, after two years of buying disappearing bees. Another, lost his hives to a flood, last year, and is planning to buy more next year. I have an order in for some of those free ones, for him. If that fails, I'll just have to give him some splits. This is a fascinating pasttime. So much to learn. If you get a book that says the bees will do something, remember, they don't read. If you do something wrong, rest assured, the girls will let you know. Enjoy!

    One more thing....Don't count on getting honey right away. That way you aren't disappointed. Leave plenty for winter. I had a load of it, last summer. Then, it rained, and rained, and rained. Then it got dry, for weeks. In the end, I got 0 honey. But my bees survived. They made enough for winter. This year looks to be pretty good. I may actually get some. If you plan on being a millionare beekeeper, it's pretty easy. Start with $2,000,000 and hang on as long as you can.

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  • Kuffar commented on Spaceman Spiff's instructable 10-Frame Langstroth Beehive2 years ago
    10-Frame Langstroth Beehive

    Look up, swarm trap. Someone else built one on here.

    I got into the bees, about 4 years ago. Ive been building my own hive bodies too. When i was a kid, we built everything with hand tools. Since I have been an adult, I have become lazy, in my old age, and have all kinds of power tools. I salute your resolve to build your own, with hand tools. When the power grid goes down, you will know what you are doing. Others will be stymied. Since you are on a tight budget, save some money, and trap your own bees. They are FREE BEES! They are used to your local weather, are probably healthier than the package bees, and you can trap as many as you like. Build a swarm trap. It's just a box, that holds some frames, and bait it with lemongrass oil, on a cottonball. I've had good luck with a big lonely tree, in the middle of a field. The bees will us...

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    I got into the bees, about 4 years ago. Ive been building my own hive bodies too. When i was a kid, we built everything with hand tools. Since I have been an adult, I have become lazy, in my old age, and have all kinds of power tools. I salute your resolve to build your own, with hand tools. When the power grid goes down, you will know what you are doing. Others will be stymied. Since you are on a tight budget, save some money, and trap your own bees. They are FREE BEES! They are used to your local weather, are probably healthier than the package bees, and you can trap as many as you like. Build a swarm trap. It's just a box, that holds some frames, and bait it with lemongrass oil, on a cottonball. I've had good luck with a big lonely tree, in the middle of a field. The bees will use it for a landmark. Put your trap 10-20' up in the tree, in the spring, and check it regularly. When I see bees, I leave it alone for about 2-3 weeks. That allows the queen to get a good batch of brood going. Slip over, after dark, plug the entrance and take your bees. If you are taking them 3 or more miles away, all is good. If you are catching them close to home, you need to force them to re-orient. Otherwise, they will return, to where you caught them, and be lost. Some beekeepers place brush over the entrance, so the bees can't fly straight out. Don't block it, just provide an obstacle, they must work around. They will re-orient to the new surroundings. To buy a bit of insurance. Take the trap back to the original spot, the next day, to pick up any stragglers. Check around, and see if there are other beekeepers in your vicinity. Maybe a club. And, Youtube has a wealth of info.

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  • Build a Langstroth Bee hive (beekeeping the simple way)

    I started keeping bees, about 4 years ago. I've built all of my hive bodies. I buy the frames, even though I did build a few. I can buy them, and assemble them myself, for about $1.25 ea., not including foundation. I have been drifting toward foundationless, but make sure you provide a good starter strip. Once your bees go the wrong way, it's a pain to fix it. I like the slanted top. I normally face my hives South, and slant my top to the North. But, any tilt is useful for water runoff. Also, since I'm approaching 65, I've noticed that my bees have gained weight. So, I'm now building mine to 8 frame boxes. It reduces the weight about 20%. They seem to winter, just fine with the smaller box.

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  • Easy Savings - Run your Dryer on Free Energy

    Hey Dr. Chill, Just ran across this ible. One thing I wanted to mention to some of your readers. Even if you live in very humid area, when the air is heated, it expands, lowering the relative humidity of that air. That's one problem with dry air, in the winter. It goes through the furnace, is heated, and that lowers the humidity of the air in your home, causing dry air, static, and dry skin. By utilizing the heated air, trapped in your attic, it already has a much lower humidity, that the air outside. So, your little device should be very efficient, even in humid climates. Before I painted our barn roof white, it was a dark gray. In the summer, it would probably surpass the 140 degree mark. It was miserable. But, it was great to put hay in, or green wood. Dried that stuff out, in...

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    Hey Dr. Chill, Just ran across this ible. One thing I wanted to mention to some of your readers. Even if you live in very humid area, when the air is heated, it expands, lowering the relative humidity of that air. That's one problem with dry air, in the winter. It goes through the furnace, is heated, and that lowers the humidity of the air in your home, causing dry air, static, and dry skin. By utilizing the heated air, trapped in your attic, it already has a much lower humidity, that the air outside. So, your little device should be very efficient, even in humid climates. Before I painted our barn roof white, it was a dark gray. In the summer, it would probably surpass the 140 degree mark. It was miserable. But, it was great to put hay in, or green wood. Dried that stuff out, in no time. I don't do hay anymore, so it has lowered the temperature in the barn by quite a bit. Makes a nice shady, cool place to work on the car, when it's 90+ out. And, yes we use the clothesline. It's free, and smells great. The only drawback, is the sandpaper bath towels. Ouch!

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  • Kuffar commented on Josehf Murchison's instructable Rebuilding Keyed Drill Chucks2 years ago
    Rebuilding Keyed Drill Chucks

    Thanks! Great Instructable. I have, also, always wondered how those were assembled. I have several, that are almost unusable due to concrete dust, and other gritty compounds.

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  • DIY Green Sand For Metal Casting

    Great video. You've made this look pretty easy. Went out and picked up a "sifter". After looking at several sifters, the one you got at Wally World, has increased to $9.00. I was looking at the Dollar Tree (a real dollar store), and their sifters were fairly coarse. I looked over, and the bacon shields are much finer mesh. Almost as fine as the $9.00 one at Wally's. I figured I'd try one, for a buck. I'll let you know how it works. Its the size of a good size skillet, too. As to cheap kitty litter, same place!

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  • Kuffar commented on Culturespy's instructable Rebuild A Carbide Lamp3 years ago
    Rebuild A Carbide Lamp

    Good 'ible. Glad to see others enjoy these historical devices. I've got more than a few of these. I used them when I was caving. I started picking them up, when I was about 12(1964). Got my first on from one of my customers, on my paper route. Over the years, I've repaired quite a few. One of your fixes, is easily performed underground, with a small rock. If you happen to run into a stalactite, and bend your reflector, so it flops around. Take it off, hold it face down in your hand, and lightly tap it with the rock, around the center hole. That'll tighten it right up. I've always been partial to a shiny reflector. The lamp puts out about 2 candlepower, so any reflection forward, gives you better lighting. I hadn't tried peeing in the lamp. Carbide and urine, make a wicked smelling b...

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    Good 'ible. Glad to see others enjoy these historical devices. I've got more than a few of these. I used them when I was caving. I started picking them up, when I was about 12(1964). Got my first on from one of my customers, on my paper route. Over the years, I've repaired quite a few. One of your fixes, is easily performed underground, with a small rock. If you happen to run into a stalactite, and bend your reflector, so it flops around. Take it off, hold it face down in your hand, and lightly tap it with the rock, around the center hole. That'll tighten it right up. I've always been partial to a shiny reflector. The lamp puts out about 2 candlepower, so any reflection forward, gives you better lighting. I hadn't tried peeing in the lamp. Carbide and urine, make a wicked smelling brew, that will nauseate a buzzard. If you have spent carbide, be very careful. You can't state this enough. We used to put our spent carbide in bread bags (2, doubled) and pack the ash out of the cave.On one trip, we were trying out "New" cave packs, made from two Clorox bottles, with the bottoms cut out. They are quite useful, when sliding your pack through mud. They will, however, trap the acetylene, that leaks from the breadbags. The explosive range of acetylene is 2- 98%. In other words, ad spark, boom! And, while I was following one of my fellow cavers, through a 2 1/2 foot high crawl, he banged his helmet on an outcropping. That caused his carbide lamp to drop a bit more water, in the chamber. His flame jumped out about 4", and he got a bit too close to his Clorox "Pig". All I could see was fire around his backside, with the smell of burning hair. He wasn't hurt, but he was in full reverse panic mode, and had no facial hair left. Always dispose of the carbide ash properly. Slobs leave it. Also, don't dump it outside the cave. It will kill a cow, and they think it's quite tasty. Farmers are not amused. I didn't know it was good for a garden, though. Thanks.

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