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Kwolf12

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  • Urine Tanned Salmon Leather

    Thanks for this information! I've made carp leather twice now; the first time using the same leather processing technique I'd used to cure deer-hide, this year using a solution of alum. I'm liking the soft, thickened leather created by using alum, but the strength is still not what I'd prefer. Strong in tension, that is--it seems that both ways I've treated the carp hide yields a leather that tears easily, about as easily as a good-quality quilting cotton fabric. The next carp hide I get, I'll try out the ammonia method instead, and find out which of the three chemical treatments work best; I'm thinking the ammonia would be best so far as the end-result odor, since it'll dissolve out the oils, then evaporate at the end. With my first batch, oil was a big problem, ultimately ruining al…

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    Thanks for this information! I've made carp leather twice now; the first time using the same leather processing technique I'd used to cure deer-hide, this year using a solution of alum. I'm liking the soft, thickened leather created by using alum, but the strength is still not what I'd prefer. Strong in tension, that is--it seems that both ways I've treated the carp hide yields a leather that tears easily, about as easily as a good-quality quilting cotton fabric. The next carp hide I get, I'll try out the ammonia method instead, and find out which of the three chemical treatments work best; I'm thinking the ammonia would be best so far as the end-result odor, since it'll dissolve out the oils, then evaporate at the end. With my first batch, oil was a big problem, ultimately ruining all but one of the hides. Learning experience! The alum method left some oils, but it seems to be less of an issue, or perhaps I just learned to be more thorough about cleaning out the oil before putting it into solution. Mostly, though, the people who have the most experience making fish-skin into leather are the ones who probably know best, so I'm hopeful that your method will be one step better! Now I just need to get my hands on the next carp.

    I hope you went ahead and did this! I had some shark-skin I harvested off of my dog-shark from Biology dissection lab, and because it was preserved in formaldehyde I only had to let it dry out to make a cool little display-piece for when I taught in the years to follow. I LOVE shark-skin, although I'd rather the sharks be living in the ocean.

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  • Kwolf12 commented on LabRaticvs's instructable Arrow Quiver
    Arrow Quiver

    Thank you for all the detail, it's really going to help me out! My friend's first fish caught bow-fishing was a large buffalo-carp, and I made fish-skin leather from it. I really wanted to make something cool for her out of it, and after a bit of thought, the obvious occurred to me; her first fish caught on an arrow should become part of a quiver for her arrows! Although fish-leather has amazing tensile strength--it would make a hell of a strong rope material!--it can rip fairly easily once it's cut. So the best way to use it is as a decorative exterior leather, rather than something that will run into sharp edges. I plan to make the interior structure from tree bark or lambskin (not sure if I have enough bark), then glue the fish hide onto the outside. The PVC cap idea is great! I'll p…

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    Thank you for all the detail, it's really going to help me out! My friend's first fish caught bow-fishing was a large buffalo-carp, and I made fish-skin leather from it. I really wanted to make something cool for her out of it, and after a bit of thought, the obvious occurred to me; her first fish caught on an arrow should become part of a quiver for her arrows! Although fish-leather has amazing tensile strength--it would make a hell of a strong rope material!--it can rip fairly easily once it's cut. So the best way to use it is as a decorative exterior leather, rather than something that will run into sharp edges. I plan to make the interior structure from tree bark or lambskin (not sure if I have enough bark), then glue the fish hide onto the outside. The PVC cap idea is great! I'll probably take a sander to the edge to make it less obvious, inside and out. At any rate--thanks again for all the detailed instructions, so I can concentrate on the materials issues rather than the build and proportions!

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  • Kwolf12's instructable Resole Hiking Boots's weekly stats:
    • Resole Hiking Boots
      4,169 views
      46 favorites
      4 comments
  • Kwolf12 commented on Kwolf12's instructable Resole Hiking Boots

    Thanks! Paracord is just one of those ubiquitous good tools to have, isn't it? I forgot to show in that step that I'd stuffed my boot full of socks to give the paracord something to push back against.

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  • Kwolf12 commented on AdrianD3's instructable Post-Apocalyptic Boots

    Like anything else you might build, this is something you work up to--but like many other things, as you start trying, you find you can do it. It takes time, yes; tools, yes, but it's not unapproachable. I've made a lot of things with leather at this point and have never had instruction beyond reading snippets here and there. I think I'm ready to make my own boots now--I need water-boots because I'm going out into the muck quite often. Won't be able to buy what I want, going to have to make it!

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  • Kwolf12 commented on marcus2015's instructable Make your own lye

    Nifty, LeNeveu2. Could you go into a short bit of detail on how you do that and where the wood-ash lye comes into it? I produce a lot of acorn flour, so I end up with huge amounts of tannin and a boiled concentrate does a great deal of the treatment on my hides. But I'm curious about other ways people tan their hides.

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  • I like these things. I've made them and used them for cooking out in the woods. Keep the lid and flatten it back down, then punch a hole in the center big enough for the wick, and place that on top with the wick poking out. That way, you can reduce the amount of flame and it makes a more efficient cooking device or a longer-lasting light source.

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  • Kwolf12 commented on ehudwill's instructable Solar Oven Mark II

    Great job and great explanations! Thank you, I'll be looking at this as one of the parts of the one I'm planning to make. By the way, the solution to your in-between-box insulation is PERLITE. Doesn't hold heat, but it's awesome insulation that takes far greater heat than you'll generate--thousand degrees F or higher. It's 90 degrees outside and I am NOT going to turn our oven on if I can avoid it, so this is how I'm hoping to get our pizzas cooked!

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  • Kwolf12 commented on Boreal House's instructable Harvesting Birch Bark

    We're experiencing a terrible infestation of emerald ash borer here in Madison, Wisconsin, so the City Forestry has to go around and cut down many, many street trees. I've just discovered the ability to peel off the cambium with a knife and some string! Yah-hoo! Ash trees, since they're not a sustainable material for bark-harvest, aren't typically used in bark crafts, but I figured I'd see what I can make. Why not? Poor trees are dead, might as well not waste the materials. Of course, I will bake the finished product in a dry heat to be SURE there are no ash-borer eggs or larva still hanging around! Now I'm trying to figure out how to get the cambium separated from the bark--it's a very fibrous and flexible layer, so I'm thinking it would make a good craft material. Anyone have an…

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    We're experiencing a terrible infestation of emerald ash borer here in Madison, Wisconsin, so the City Forestry has to go around and cut down many, many street trees. I've just discovered the ability to peel off the cambium with a knife and some string! Yah-hoo! Ash trees, since they're not a sustainable material for bark-harvest, aren't typically used in bark crafts, but I figured I'd see what I can make. Why not? Poor trees are dead, might as well not waste the materials. Of course, I will bake the finished product in a dry heat to be SURE there are no ash-borer eggs or larva still hanging around! Now I'm trying to figure out how to get the cambium separated from the bark--it's a very fibrous and flexible layer, so I'm thinking it would make a good craft material. Anyone have any ideas about that?

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