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Looman_projects

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  • Planetary Gear Clock

    What input voltage did you use for the PCB? Because the voltage goes to the stepper motor directly. Mine runs on 5V and the stepper driver is warm to the touch.

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  • Planetary Gear Clock

    That is a very good one. I had not yet tough of this, but it worked! I checked the website and could re-download the Gerber files from their system. I have uploaded them to the Instructables.

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  • Planetary Gear Clock

    Hi Pepijn,I have not had any problems with a flick noise of the belt. My clock makes a very audible but discrete "tick" from the stepper motor, there is no slowly decaying rubber band noise in the belt. I must say i have very little tension on the belt (just enough to keep the teeth grabbing) to reduce forces on the planet gears as much as possible. Belt tension is not really needed anyway. At wat voltage are you running your stepper motor? And are you using half steps or full steps?Kind regards,Kevin

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  • Planetary Gear Clock

    HI, wood will work just fine for the gears, and Neypp posted his clock under "I made this" and he had a very elegant solution to move the stepper to the backside of the clock using an extra plate.

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  • Looman_projects's entry Planetary Gear Clock is a winner in the Clocks Contest contest
  • Planetary Gear Clock

    Hi,I assume you did not scale the gears and the distance between the planets gears is correct. It does not appear to be a very bad fit on you picture. Its almost 3 years ago that i made these parts but it could be that i already adapted the DXF drawings for the lasercutter, which (due to the width of the laser burn) always makes parts slightly smaller then your drawing.I also made several test gearsets out of very cheap material before making my final gears, you could also make a test gearset and see if it works.Kind Regards,Kevin

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  • Looman_projects's entry Planetary Gear Clock is a finalist in the Clocks Contest contest
  • Smart 3D Printer Filament Counter

    How do you accurately measure the radius of your pulley? I see the measuring pulley has a rubber ring around it making it difficult to check the radius with a caliper/micrometer. And it also seems like a bad idea to have such a rubber layer on you measurement wheel since the pretension (or the amount your filament is pushed into the pulley) determines the effective radius of the measurement pulley. It would be better to have a rigid measurement wheel an the rubber band around the idler wheel. Have you checked the accuracy of your filament counter against some known form of length measurement? For example putting some marks on you filament every 5 meters with a tape measure and checking these?

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  • Planetary Gear Clock

    I used a capacitor of 100 uF, 25V

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  • Planetary Gear Clock

    Nice idea, let me know what your results are when using the 3D printer!

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  • Planetary Gear Clock

    I would not use a simple geared DC motor since their RPM depends heavily on the supplied current, the load (there is some varying friction in the mechanical parts of this clock) and even things such as room temperature. These motors will not give you an accurate timepiece. You could sove this by adding an encoder and using an Arduino as controller but that is exactly what you did not want :) You could look for some sort of small AC motor of which the RPM is defined by the 50 Hz mains frequency. Since the mains frequency is usually quite accurate these motors can be used for clocks. I dont have experience with these motors, but maybe someone else has good/bad experiences with these?

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    • Planetary Gear Clock
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  • Planetary Gear Clock

    You are completely right about the files!I added all the dxf and stl files for the wooden parts to step 2. Unfortunately the Gerber files died togehter with my old harddisk so i do not have them anymore....Thanks for your vote!

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    Yes! i forgot to add these. I uploaded them today, i attached them to step 2.

    Wow that's a long comment, thanks for you interest in this project!The number of teeth on the gears: They indeed need to adhere to a certain constraint to ensure the planet gears are evenly spaced. But you are talking about having the planet gears being in sync, this is a heavier constraint then only wanting the spacing to be equal. From the source mentioned in the instructable: "if you want the planetary gears to be evenly spaced, and all be engaging the next toothat the same time, then both your sun and your ring gear needs to be evenlydivisible by the number of planets.If you want them to be evenly spaced, but don't need them to all be in the same phasewith respect to their teeth, then then the sum of the ring gear's teeth and the sungear's teeth must be evenly divisible by the nu…

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    Wow that's a long comment, thanks for you interest in this project!The number of teeth on the gears: They indeed need to adhere to a certain constraint to ensure the planet gears are evenly spaced. But you are talking about having the planet gears being in sync, this is a heavier constraint then only wanting the spacing to be equal. From the source mentioned in the instructable: "if you want the planetary gears to be evenly spaced, and all be engaging the next toothat the same time, then both your sun and your ring gear needs to be evenlydivisible by the number of planets.If you want them to be evenly spaced, but don't need them to all be in the same phasewith respect to their teeth, then then the sum of the ring gear's teeth and the sungear's teeth must be evenly divisible by the number of planets."So it would always be better to adhere to the first, but since these gears are practically at standstill the second option works just fine.Resolution and use of the position sensor:If you watch the included movie you will see my clock homing at something like 05:49. This could just as well be 2:18 or 8:32, it doesn't matter. What matters is repeatability, you want the clock to stop at the same position every time you do the homing. Whatever time it stops at is you reference. Recalibrating every time you expect to see the reference would be a neat feature! I have not experienced any skipped steps however, but still a nice and smart add-on.Laser cutting the acrylic:You clearly have more knowledge about this then i have! All i know is that these gears face speeds of almost 0 and forces of almost 0 and they have performed very well over the last three years.

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  • Planetary Gear Clock

    That would indeed be awesome! You would need an 1:60 reduction between second and minute hand, which is probably doable with a two-stage planetary gearbox, or perhaps a harmonic drive.

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