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  • LukeM105 commented on TheGrantAlexander's instructable Mallet in Under 1 Hour8 weeks ago
    Mallet in Under 1 Hour

    Thanks for the reply. That's very interesting about the pushsticks. I will definitely check out the video. I understand that the bandsaw fence is in the way of lowering the blade in number 2. I tried to describe using another piece of wood between the fence and the workpiece as an auxiliary fence, but it was difficult to do with words. My fence is quite tall so I use an additional piece of wood that is shorter so I can lower the blade to the height of the workpiece. Sometimes I put a clamp behind it so it doesn't slide as I push the workpiece.Take care.“As iron sharpens iron, so one man sharpens another.” Proverbs 27:17

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  • LukeM105 commented on TheGrantAlexander's instructable Mallet in Under 1 Hour8 weeks ago
    Mallet in Under 1 Hour

    I was looking at the pictures and did not see the safety notes. I apologize. I appreciate your openness and don't want to come across as self-righteous in any way. Safety is something we all have to continuously work towards and help each other with. Here is a link to a document that I use all the time that you might find interesting: https://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/irp/resdocs/headsup.pdf Sometimes knowing the rules also helps with knowing the risks and having better judgement when breaking the rules. Wearing loose clothing is a good example since on a construction site it is often necessary to wear a jacket or sweater when working in the cold and using machinery. A worker might need to use a guard or keep extra distance or have a coworker help or remove the clothing for a particular operat...

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    I was looking at the pictures and did not see the safety notes. I apologize. I appreciate your openness and don't want to come across as self-righteous in any way. Safety is something we all have to continuously work towards and help each other with. Here is a link to a document that I use all the time that you might find interesting: https://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/irp/resdocs/headsup.pdf Sometimes knowing the rules also helps with knowing the risks and having better judgement when breaking the rules. Wearing loose clothing is a good example since on a construction site it is often necessary to wear a jacket or sweater when working in the cold and using machinery. A worker might need to use a guard or keep extra distance or have a coworker help or remove the clothing for a particular operation to minimize the risk. Two things I tell my students: 1. Somebody paid the price for every safety rule, so learn from their mistake rather than your own. 2. You might get away with something ten thousand times, but you don't know which time you won't. I know an instructor who permanently removed the guard off the table saw. Over his thirty-five year career, three of his students lost fingers and another cut the nerves and tendons in his wrist on the table saw. Since you asked for specifics, here are a few things that caught my eye. Hopefully they correspond to the pictures I added.1. You did mention that it is a lot of exposed blade on the table saw and that you recommended that people use their guards etc. The amount of blade, in addition to how close your fingers are to the blade with no push stick, especially with no guard, splitter or anti-kickback teeth, makes the cut in this first picture something I would never do or recommend that anyone do no matter how experienced they are. I do like how you are standing to the side, though. :)2. Set the band saw guide/guard close (a few mm) to the work piece. I use extra pieces of wood next to the fence that are machined square and match the height of the workpiece to allow the guard to be lowered close to the stock. Also, remove jewelry (rings and bracelets) and watches.3. Ripping stock that is too short and wider than it is long. You would be better off cross cutting that piece on a cross-cut sled and might even have to clamp it or screw it to the sled.4. Your pushstick is quite stubby for this operation, which is why you needed to use it to hold the workpiece down. I am curious about how you were able to finish that cut since you are pushing the work forward outside the blade and only down inside the blade. You are very luck if that did not slip out from under the push stick and kick back. There is another style of push stick that I would describe as the profile of a dress shoe from the side. It has a heel and a longer nose allowing you to push forward and hold the workpiece down at the same time.5. The factors to consider when drilling are workpiece size, drill bit size and material hardness. That is a large bit and a relatively small workpiece in comparison. The material is not as hard as metal, but being hardwood, it's not that soft, either. I know you made a safety note about using a clamp, which is great. I am surprised you are able to hold it without it spinning. However, if it does spin, it likely won't cause too bad an injury. So, then it becomes a judgement call. Personally, I would clamp it or use a jig to hold it to avoid any risk of injury, and I would teach others to do the same.This did take me a long time to write, but I think it was worth it. I hope that you will see it as helpful."Whosoever holds this hammer, if he be worthy, shall possess the power of Thor."

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