author
9CommentsEast TexasJoined October 18th, 2010
I live in East Texas, work all over the same as an equipment technician for Azalea Surgical Products, have two kids and two grand kids. I like to putter in the shed with my mini machines such as a wood and metal lathe and a small CNC 3 axis mill (Taig). I used to be an autobody tech so every now and then I get an itch to fix up and paint something nice. I really like to learn new things about my chosen hobbies and explore new ideas I find on the net about ways to explore things I'm interested... Read More »
  • Lynn Livingston commented on neslo63's instructable Recirculating Air Spray Booth 2 months ago
    Recirculating Air Spray Booth

    Great job and great ible, thanks. I notice a few questions are coming up about the capacity of the air system. I can help a little on this; I made a booth pretty much like this one, except a tad bit smaller for refinishing guitar bodies, about 20 years ago. Then, and probably now, there was quite a bit of information available on the net for design targets and parameters. One of the constants that I found, was that nearly all the commercial spray booths (of all kinds) and commercial kits, specified a filter face capacity of 10K cubic feet per minute of air. I did utilize an explosion proof fan of that capacity (some of the materials I used was solvent based) and it worked well. However, I found that item alone cost as much as the rest of the booth materials combined. If I were to build ...

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    Great job and great ible, thanks. I notice a few questions are coming up about the capacity of the air system. I can help a little on this; I made a booth pretty much like this one, except a tad bit smaller for refinishing guitar bodies, about 20 years ago. Then, and probably now, there was quite a bit of information available on the net for design targets and parameters. One of the constants that I found, was that nearly all the commercial spray booths (of all kinds) and commercial kits, specified a filter face capacity of 10K cubic feet per minute of air. I did utilize an explosion proof fan of that capacity (some of the materials I used was solvent based) and it worked well. However, I found that item alone cost as much as the rest of the booth materials combined. If I were to build one again, I might utilize a fan design like this one, and maybe make a change to water-borne materials. That might save money on the fan/blower used. One other consideration for cost; Everything I used before was single phase electrical components. Had I had access to 3 phase electrical supply, the fan/blower would have been much more economical to purchase, and run.

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  • Lynn Livingston commented on groupamazing's instructable Momma's Fresh Salsa11 months ago
    Momma's Fresh Salsa

    I'm sure this is wonderfully delicious! For a little more smokey flavor, roast the tomatoes and jalapeno peppers. I also add roasted garlic to mine. For those who like a little extra spicy, you can add a little cayenne (I use power form) or other hotter pepper for a little more zing.

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  • Lynn Livingston commented on ChrisN219's instructable Lithophane Box With Remote1 year ago
    Lithophane Box With Remote

    The link to create the lithophane does not work for me. Can you check to see if it is correct? Thank you.

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  • Lynn Livingston commented on SpecificLove's instructable DIY Water Misting System1 year ago
    DIY Water Misting System

    I don't want to rain on your project, but since I have built several of these over the years I just want to point out a few things I've struggled with.Without getting too complicated in explanation, mister systems work best when the water droplet size is so small it is actually vapor, and not mist at all. In order to get this, I've found through much experimentation, that it takes a LOT of pressure, and low volume, to get it there. It's not easy or inexpensive to do it either.With your system, you will soon find that everything under the canopy will be wet in time. On humid days, it will increase dramatically, as on cooler days. Any wind at all and nothing in the area will be dry. I have experienced this many times with the nozzles your are using with up to 400 PSI, and also much more e...

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    I don't want to rain on your project, but since I have built several of these over the years I just want to point out a few things I've struggled with.Without getting too complicated in explanation, mister systems work best when the water droplet size is so small it is actually vapor, and not mist at all. In order to get this, I've found through much experimentation, that it takes a LOT of pressure, and low volume, to get it there. It's not easy or inexpensive to do it either.With your system, you will soon find that everything under the canopy will be wet in time. On humid days, it will increase dramatically, as on cooler days. Any wind at all and nothing in the area will be dry. I have experienced this many times with the nozzles your are using with up to 400 PSI, and also much more expensive "professional" misting nozzles at this pressure level.I've tried high pressure and high velocity fans to disperse the droplets from these nozzles you are using to some degree of success, and pumps from a few hundred PSI all the way to a 1000 PSI pump. The 1000 PSI low volume pump was by far the best performing, demonstrably coolest vapor that I have been able to achieve. It also was the only one that will run for several hours and you and everything under the canopy will stay dry, and wonderfully cooler than the ambient temp by about 12 degrees tops. However, the wind chill inherent in a good vapor system (even at 100 deg) will make you "feel" cooler.Now, if you don't need it to be portable, there are some other tricks I wanted to try out, such as homemade water chillers downstream of the pump (which inherently add heat to the vapor). But alas, speed costs money, how fast do you want to go? And the faster you go, further progress nets smaller gains but costs much more.When I compared what I'd spent (some things I did find as junk), not counting the hours involved I could have just bought a commercial unit with a warranty : ) Although I did spread the cost out over several years of on-again-off-again experimentation. Oh the price of not being an engineer! : )Thanks for the ible, I did learn from it and I appreciate you sharing it. Best to you.

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  • Restaurant-Style Salsa

    Very nice! This is basically how I've been making salsa for years. This basic recipe can be change slightly in any direction for wonderful variants. One of the variants we enjoy is adding a some Cayenne for a hotter mix. Also, although it takes some time, we will roast the veggies (also when using fresh tomatoes too) for a more "earthy" flavor when wanted. Plus, roasted garlic and Jalapenos makes the whole house smell yummy! Thanks for sharing.

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  • Lynn Livingston followed mikeasaurus2 years ago
      • Woodworking Class
      • how to shave with an axe
      • 360 degree analog camera hat
  • Simple Plywood Cutting Table / Work Table (Updated)

    Well, I thought I had found a reason to replace my 30yr old circular saw, but alas it dawned on me I could fit the guide to the right side of the saw, and once I did that I was gettin' it done. The project came out nice and I appreciate the 'ible'; I've got a lot to learn about wood working and no doubt I and others will benefit much.Thanks.

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  • Simple Plywood Cutting Table / Work Table (Updated)

    I tried making this exactly like the article. However, I ran into trouble because my circular saw will not cut as deep as the notches, and have the motor housing clear the guide you built. So, i went and bought an aluminum guide that is much thinner, and to my surprise (and chagrin since I was foolish not to take careful measurement) it won't clear that guide either when set for 2 1/4" depth of cut. Your picture of the circular saw sitting on the guide looks like the blade isn't set deep enough to cut the notches but I can't really tell. I went to Lowe's today and looked at every circular saw, and every one wouldn't cut this deep without the motor housing also hitting the guide. I'd sure like to know what saw you have so I can get one. I plan on using this guide a lot, although ra...

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    I tried making this exactly like the article. However, I ran into trouble because my circular saw will not cut as deep as the notches, and have the motor housing clear the guide you built. So, i went and bought an aluminum guide that is much thinner, and to my surprise (and chagrin since I was foolish not to take careful measurement) it won't clear that guide either when set for 2 1/4" depth of cut. Your picture of the circular saw sitting on the guide looks like the blade isn't set deep enough to cut the notches but I can't really tell. I went to Lowe's today and looked at every circular saw, and every one wouldn't cut this deep without the motor housing also hitting the guide. I'd sure like to know what saw you have so I can get one. I plan on using this guide a lot, although rarely I guess would I need to cut so deep. Thanks.

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