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  • Markfothebeast commented on DeathBlade's instructable Homemade AirCompressor1 year ago
    Homemade AirCompressor

    I don't believe I heard anything about a check valve. A compressor pump should have a dedicated line with a check valve. This stops air pressure in the tank from flowing back in to the pump cylinder(s). Without it, the electric motor can draw an immense amount of starting current to fight the compression in the pump cylinder (when the tank is pressurized). It can either set off a breaker and/or potentially damage the motor.I read several mentions of oil/water separators in the comments. Having a separator on both the pump line and tank output is ideal. However, removing moisture doesn't work as easily as simply installing a separator or two. The hot, compressed air will wizz right through a separator and leave very little, if any moisture. You may find some oil residue inside, though. T...

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    I don't believe I heard anything about a check valve. A compressor pump should have a dedicated line with a check valve. This stops air pressure in the tank from flowing back in to the pump cylinder(s). Without it, the electric motor can draw an immense amount of starting current to fight the compression in the pump cylinder (when the tank is pressurized). It can either set off a breaker and/or potentially damage the motor.I read several mentions of oil/water separators in the comments. Having a separator on both the pump line and tank output is ideal. However, removing moisture doesn't work as easily as simply installing a separator or two. The hot, compressed air will wizz right through a separator and leave very little, if any moisture. You may find some oil residue inside, though. The air requires a means of cooling before hitting the separator to allow the moisture to be removed. The most effective way of cooling is with a parallel cooler such as an automotive AC condensor (or any AC condensor in general). The separator is just a neat compressor decoration and slowing air flow if it is not serving its purpose.

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  • How to Bend Copper Pipe and Tubing without Crushing It

    After a little research, apparently it is almost impossible to bend the 3/4" copper piping without it collapsing in on itself (tubing is sold in rolls and pipe is sold in straight sections). But I will give it a try with a torch while filled with salt or sand. The tubing is much more flexible vs the very hard straight piping.

    I pulled some 1960s copper pipe out of my home. This old copper pipe has a very thick inner wall compared to what I have seen at the outlet stores. I saw that there is a class M (thin), L, and I believe K. Which the last two are the thicker walled pipe which is recommended for my application (air compressor line). I'm tired of buying angled fittings for the pipe and soldering turns and angles. I'm going to give this a try on the older 3/4" copper piping. Bending it is thinning the wall but it shouldn't hurt it too much. The 1/4" shown is ridiculously easy to bend. Thanks for the quick DIY instruction.

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