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  • MaxR102 commented on Wood Chuck's instructable Bandsaw Boxes Made Easy8 months ago
    Bandsaw Boxes Made Easy

    Your prompt reply is most welcome.My project should be easy compared with your band-saw box. My concerns relate to tight curves relate to the blade used.How do I avoid:1 Scorching the stock with a smaller (3/16ths-inch) blade's quicker heat build-up?2 Twisting the blade?3 Snapping the blade?

    Outside curves of the piece on your foto's left are gentle. Inner curves of the middle piece are often very tight. Same for some inner curves of the piece on the right. I am trying to fabricate a three-dimensional puzzle, better described three paras. down. I am not yet to that point. So I decided 1st to see how tightly I could cut one wavy kerf down the length of a 3" x 3" x 16" piece of basswood. The result was two long COMPLEMENTARY pieces (parted by the one wavy kerf). My bandsaw's blade measured 1/4"-inch from tooth tips to its straight back edge. Still, I could cut no tight curves though I tried. As I tried, the blade twisted worrying me no little (as an overheated blade could snap) and the finished two lengthwise pieces showed evident scorching. I am trying t...

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    Outside curves of the piece on your foto's left are gentle. Inner curves of the middle piece are often very tight. Same for some inner curves of the piece on the right. I am trying to fabricate a three-dimensional puzzle, better described three paras. down. I am not yet to that point. So I decided 1st to see how tightly I could cut one wavy kerf down the length of a 3" x 3" x 16" piece of basswood. The result was two long COMPLEMENTARY pieces (parted by the one wavy kerf). My bandsaw's blade measured 1/4"-inch from tooth tips to its straight back edge. Still, I could cut no tight curves though I tried. As I tried, the blade twisted worrying me no little (as an overheated blade could snap) and the finished two lengthwise pieces showed evident scorching. I am trying to make a three-dimensional puzzle. Before any sawing, smaller pieces of basswood must be laminated into a 9" x 9" x 16" wooden rectangular solid, because one solid piece of basswood that big would cost too much. If I succeed, FOUR, lengthwise-wavy kerfs will cut the rectangular solid into NINE lengths. The nine lengths will fit together again as a 9" x 9" x 16" rectangular solid if the four complementary curved surfaces are matched. Each of the four corner lengths will have two wavy surfaces. Each of the four middle-outside lengths will have three wavy surfaces. The one middle piece will have four wavy surfaces. Some undulations will be tight and others will be gentle. No TWO lengthwise kerfs will be alike. I belong to the Guild of Oregon Woodworkers (Portland). Its workshop has one bandsaw with a 1/2"-wide blade, the bandsaw I used has a blade 1/4"-wide. The Guild has another bandsaw which can take a 3/16"-wide blade. A 3/16"-wide blade should enable kerfs with tighter curves. Yet my chief worries are that heat should build up quicker in such a narrow blade, it should scorch a lot, will twist more easily, and can more easily snap.You can CUT THRU most of MY paras. two thru five's VERBIAGE, if you draw a simple rectangular solid, with a 9"-inch square butt end and a 16"-inch length. Then divide each of the two, seeable long ends with two long lines. These will divide the one seeable butt-end into nine equal parts. The picture will then represent a long rectangular solid divided into nine, equal, straight lengths. MY PUZZLE WILL DIFFER only by its LENGTHWISE CUTS BEING WAVY. I know of puzzles like the one described, but not how anyone fabricated them without setting a fire or snapping a blade. Another problem with the Guild's bandsaw is its guidepost will not open 9". I must find a bandsaw to thru material 9"-thick. But can you advise with handling the other problems?:1 Tight curves <-- very important. 2 Minimal scorching 3 No blade twisting 4 No blade snapping

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