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  • Hello there! The coupling coeficient k doesn't effect the value of the inductor & capacitor (at least to first order). The value "k" gets smaller as the coils get farther apart. If you want to know the equation for the inductor and capacitor, you can read about it on this website:https://www.allaboutcircuits.com/textbook/alternat...You can always tune the values for different resonant frequencies.

    Hello there! The coupling coeficient k doesn't effect the value of the inductor & capacitor (at least to first order). The value "k" gets smaller as the coils get farther apart. If you want to know the equation for the inductor and capacitor, you can read about it on this website:https://www.allaboutcircuits.com/textbook/alternat...You can always tune the values for different resonant frequencies.

    Hello there! The coupling coeficient k doesn't effect the value of the inductor & capacitor (at least to first order). The value "k" gets smaller as the coils get farther apart. If you want to know the equation for the inductor and capacitor, you can read about it on this website:https://www.allaboutcircuits.com/textbook/alternat...You can always tune the values for different resonant frequencies.

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  • Don't worry, we've already started a Makerspace! :)

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  • Great! Let us know how it works!

    Yes, you can see the graphs in step 8. At close range, it's pretty efficient. But at longer range, it's not at all efficient. But that's true for pretty much any wireless system.

    It's a pretty cool church! Check it out http://www.the-river.org

    This will not interfere with surrounding circuitry. The magnetic field intensity levels at any one location are very low. We did optimize the frequency for a couple different reasons. First, the higher the frequency, the small the capacitor, since we needed a 500V capacitor, we needed a high enough frequency to get the capacitor less than 1uF (8kHz does the trick). Second, we needed the frequency to be low enough that even cheap computer speakers would work. If, for example, we had chosen 15kHz, then we'd need a very high end audio power amp to drive it. So 8kHz is a good comprimise!

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  • Good point, we fixed that, should have been cm, not mm!!

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