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MikB

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Software geek, electronics enthusiast, musician, artist ... I enjoy making stuff, and discovering new things!

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  • How to Hem Clothing With Iron on Adhesive

    I've never had much luck with this stuff "Wonder Web" and similar, esp. on heavier materials like denim. Be prepared to repeat this each time you machine wash the garment :(

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  • Build Mini Conveyor Belt As Slinky Machine

    To keep the slinky on track "forever", you could add two IR "beam break" sensors near the top and bottom of the track. That way, if any part of the slinky breaks the lower beam, speed up the track a little, and if it breaks the top one, slow down a little.No doubt you could throw a small microcontroller at this to monitor both sensors and make a PWM signal that starts at "nominally correct" speed, and then nudges it up or down.

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  • MikB commented on araymbox's instructable PiNAS - the Raspberry Pi NAS
    PiNAS - the Raspberry Pi NAS

    Single point of failure -- the USB controller on the PI which is driving both drives (and, in Pi up to version 3, the network too!)That's one of the problems with RAID on the Pi (there is no good way to attach 2-4 drives without them all going through the same USB controller). Also, that's a performance bottleneck.My greatest stumbling block with RAID on Pi, is that with almost every USB to SATA adapter, you have zero visibility of the SMART parameters of the drive (smartctl reports an error). SMART early reporting has saved me a lot of grief, and given me time to ensure backups are complete and buy new hardware, before the old died, multiple times.

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  • Listen Oscilloscope Music From Jerobeam Fenderson

    No editing/modifying needed, it's purely using CoolEdit as an X-Y viewer, like an oscilloscope. See below examples ...

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  • Listen Oscilloscope Music From Jerobeam Fenderson

    A while ago, I watched some of these in Cooledit Pro (now called Adobe Audition) -- if you have audio editing software you may have a similar tool, under Analyse -> Phase Analysis. It's a software 'scope that plots X against Y (or mid against side) to show whether your audio is mono, well balanced stereo, unbalanced stereo, or out-of-phase annoying stereo :)As a side effect, it also works for these files!

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  • ZERO CLEARANCE INSERT FOR TABLE SAW

    In your step 9: That riving knife is the reason why a lot of these zero-clearance "easy to make" things fail. I think that's the first time I've seen someone confess that it didn't "just work" :)On most European saws, the knife is always slightly higher than the blade, and means you can't do it the easy way: Lower blade all the way down, fit the plate, raise blade up through the plate. Stop. Done! -- You also can't do non-through cuts (dados, grooves, cutting super-thick pieces by half-cutting from each side etc. etc.)Most American saws seem to have no knife at all, and so this is really easy. I don't even think the riving knife on mine is removable, it's part of the structure and also supports the blade guard. Maybe some (better) saw let you remove it, ill advised a...

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    In your step 9: That riving knife is the reason why a lot of these zero-clearance "easy to make" things fail. I think that's the first time I've seen someone confess that it didn't "just work" :)On most European saws, the knife is always slightly higher than the blade, and means you can't do it the easy way: Lower blade all the way down, fit the plate, raise blade up through the plate. Stop. Done! -- You also can't do non-through cuts (dados, grooves, cutting super-thick pieces by half-cutting from each side etc. etc.)Most American saws seem to have no knife at all, and so this is really easy. I don't even think the riving knife on mine is removable, it's part of the structure and also supports the blade guard. Maybe some (better) saw let you remove it, ill advised as that is ...

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  • 6502 Minimal Computer (with Arduino MEGA)

    Thanks to Alex from NZ for pointing me to the post above!You're right, the processor doesn't do "random". I think no matter how fast your Arduino gets up and running, it will miss the moment of 6502 power-on, unless it is up and running before the 6502 even gets power. So, the first power-on reset would be missed.The interrupt lines being tied high (not used) isn't a problem, it's good practice. What confused me was: knowing that you HAD tied it high, why was an interrupt behaviour shown? I'd overlooked -- software generated interrupts. (BRK, opcode #00). You're right, examples don't have to be perfect, but it's like forgetting to initialise a pointer in C, it may work mostly and then for no reason go crazy on you -- e.g. accidentally receiving an interrupt when you hadn't set...

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    Thanks to Alex from NZ for pointing me to the post above!You're right, the processor doesn't do "random". I think no matter how fast your Arduino gets up and running, it will miss the moment of 6502 power-on, unless it is up and running before the 6502 even gets power. So, the first power-on reset would be missed.The interrupt lines being tied high (not used) isn't a problem, it's good practice. What confused me was: knowing that you HAD tied it high, why was an interrupt behaviour shown? I'd overlooked -- software generated interrupts. (BRK, opcode #00). You're right, examples don't have to be perfect, but it's like forgetting to initialise a pointer in C, it may work mostly and then for no reason go crazy on you -- e.g. accidentally receiving an interrupt when you hadn't set up the handler. This is machine code, assume everything is set up wrong until you set it right. Even the things you didn't even know you had to set up :)If you pull IRQ low (and you've enabled interrupts, see SEI/CLI), it will cause a JMP to the vector stored at #FFFE/FFFF (like #FFFC/FFFD for power on, and #FFFA/#FFFB for NMI. You will need proper interrupt handling code, and have a return from interrupt (RTI) at the end. Google "6502 interrupt handler" for examples, there's a correct way in and out to preserve registers.Your additional screen shot confirms the same behaviour, repeatedly writing the current address+1, and status to the stack (#01FF down ...) and then jumping to an interrupt, getting another one, repeat ... :)Have fun extending this to the 6522 etc. !

    Interested to see this project (coming from an Oric/Atmos background, which also uses a 6502A). I spent a little while staring at the original dump in step 4 [I note you have since updated this image, which is a shame, original is below!], as you seemed to have captured moments "Before The Big Bang!" :)If the 6502 has not been reset yet, what is it doing there?From what I can tell :Your 0.1uF capacitor reset the 6502, the moment you powered up. So it was already running when you hit reset.What you (could) see it doing is odd to me, #FFFE/#FFFF being fetched is for the interrupt (IRQ) vector. Yet, you have tied the interrupt line to +5v (no interrupt there ...)Looking closer, it fetched from #E701/E702 (value #00), which is opcode "BRK", a software interrupt. Ah!It th...

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    Interested to see this project (coming from an Oric/Atmos background, which also uses a 6502A). I spent a little while staring at the original dump in step 4 [I note you have since updated this image, which is a shame, original is below!], as you seemed to have captured moments "Before The Big Bang!" :)If the 6502 has not been reset yet, what is it doing there?From what I can tell :Your 0.1uF capacitor reset the 6502, the moment you powered up. So it was already running when you hit reset.What you (could) see it doing is odd to me, #FFFE/#FFFF being fetched is for the interrupt (IRQ) vector. Yet, you have tied the interrupt line to +5v (no interrupt there ...)Looking closer, it fetched from #E701/E702 (value #00), which is opcode "BRK", a software interrupt. Ah!It then wrote to three locations, #0149,#0148,#0147 -- this is the processor trying to store the return program counter (value #e7, #03), and status register (value #34) before fetching the IRQ vector (from #FFFE, #FFFF). Values read: #00 and #00 = Address #0000So now execution continues from #0000, unfortunately, that also holds #00, and triggers another interrupt inside the first. This will continue for ever, filling the stack downwards from #01FF to #0100 before it wraps around.So that's what it was doing :)Note, you should always LDX $#FF then TXS (Transfer X to Stack Pointer) to set the stack pointer to the top of stack, at the start of a 6502 piece of code, so it won't misbehave. You should also SED or CLD (set/clear Decimal Mode) so you know how maths/logic operations will work, otherwise it's really unreliable. :)What clock speed can you actually achieve doing this?

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  • Has something changed regarding PDF downloads? Both Iceweasel and TOR Browser (Firefox derived) -- if I click on the "Download" option at the top of an instructable (or the floating tool bar that appears once you scroll down) -- nothing happens, nothing is downloaded.

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  • DIY Cantilevered Material Shelving

    I didn't realize you'd added the holes yourself, that makes sense (I should have read step 1 more closely) :) Looking at the original holes (if they're anything like what I'm used to), they were probably pressed into a countersink shape. Although the material is too thin to countersink, it's rather hard steel, and not the sort of thing you press to shape without the proper gear!

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  • DIY Cantilevered Material Shelving

    "In my case, I had to grind down the head diameter of 2 of the 3 screws for each standard."It looks like the steel dual-channel you use is different to the stuff I'm used to seeing, yours seems to have plain drilled holes in, and you used roundhead screws, which is why they interfere. Usually, the channel strips have sunken/recessed (pressed) countersink holes, and are used with countersunk screws, so they stay out of the way. But also, you channel has a LOT more screw holes, I only get 1 screw hole per ~6 slots.

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  • How to Make 6V Lead Acid Battery Charger

    Aside from "don't touch the circuit" -- don't touch the battery, or anything vaguely connected to it, this whole circuit is considered at hazardous mains potential.This style of transformerless power supply should be treated with suspicion and respect :) They are usually used in entirely contained projects, where there are NO external connections accessible at all.The capacitor you have used is inappropriate. You say this is for use with 240V AC, however the capacitor you show is 250V working. The peak value of the mains in normal operation is well over 250V, never mind peaks and surges. So it should be higher voltage working.It looks like an ordinary polyester cap. Look up Class-X and Class-Y capacitors, these are designed for use in these positions, and are designed to fail ...

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    Aside from "don't touch the circuit" -- don't touch the battery, or anything vaguely connected to it, this whole circuit is considered at hazardous mains potential.This style of transformerless power supply should be treated with suspicion and respect :) They are usually used in entirely contained projects, where there are NO external connections accessible at all.The capacitor you have used is inappropriate. You say this is for use with 240V AC, however the capacitor you show is 250V working. The peak value of the mains in normal operation is well over 250V, never mind peaks and surges. So it should be higher voltage working.It looks like an ordinary polyester cap. Look up Class-X and Class-Y capacitors, these are designed for use in these positions, and are designed to fail safe. Normal capacitors are not.Please add a fuse in line with the incoming live mains!Your designations for the polarity of the four diodes (bridge) are confused: The symbols |>| are correct, but the extra "+" and "-" are the wrong way round. Remove them. Same for the LED.Lastly: Lead Acid batteries should be charged at VERY clearly limited constant voltage, any higher and they just start to bubble away hydrogen. Even the "sealed" ones. This will destroy them. You absolutely MUST find a way to limit the voltage accurately as per the battery spec.

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  • MikB commented on NeRD-AETTUA's instructable RasPro
    RasPro

    Cool project, but I see no mention of safety earthing. As this is a metal case, and liable to come in contact with high voltages (including from a power supply held down with hot glue!) please remember to add a firm connection bolted to the grater to the incoming IEC earth.

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  • MikB commented on liquidhandwash's forum topic Site update?

    Bookmarked! So glad this feature has been put back -- thanks!

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  • Make a Chain From a PVC Pipe

    I can't quite tell from the picture, but if it's the mini razor-saw slitting blades, then I don't even like using them handheld, at all, because they have tendency to catch and take off (cartoon style) across the workpiece and aim straight for any body parts :(If it's the cut-off discs (thin grinders), then maybe you get away with it, like when you accidentally file your finger: A file will remove material from wood/metal/plastic but not so much with skin ... !But I echo seamster's thought. :)

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  • Electro-etching Aluminium

    Step 2: "the toner transfer method is really good or you can use a resit-pen"Is this the kind of pen you use after your first attempt at exams, with the slogan "Exam. Fail. Repeat"Sorry, I couldn't resist :)

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