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  • Honda Civic Micro Camper/utility Trailer

    Nicely written, and a pleasure to read! If you decide not to pursue a career in mechanics, perhaps you could look into writing technical manuals. I have read far too many of those things that were obviously written by people who had no clue what they were even writing about. It's not often that you come across mechanics with writing skills, or vice versa.I have agree with sky-fish on the tongue weight issue. I'm not sure where you are located, but most jurisdictions have differing rules on trailers, some more stringent than others, and I doubt the axle placement would pass inspection. I'm sure you have seen pick-up truck beds and frames converted to utility trailers. (They were the poor man's DIY trailer back before Harbor Freight started sell their junk.) The axle placement on them, fo...

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    Nicely written, and a pleasure to read! If you decide not to pursue a career in mechanics, perhaps you could look into writing technical manuals. I have read far too many of those things that were obviously written by people who had no clue what they were even writing about. It's not often that you come across mechanics with writing skills, or vice versa.I have agree with sky-fish on the tongue weight issue. I'm not sure where you are located, but most jurisdictions have differing rules on trailers, some more stringent than others, and I doubt the axle placement would pass inspection. I'm sure you have seen pick-up truck beds and frames converted to utility trailers. (They were the poor man's DIY trailer back before Harbor Freight started sell their junk.) The axle placement on them, for the most part, was in the ideal position.

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  • Mr Frugal commented on wilgubeast's instructable 11 Unusual Uses for Baby Oil1 year ago
    11 Unusual Uses for Baby Oil

    I have a ridiculously large Jacuzzi-type jetted bath tub in one bathroom. It never gets used because it uses an insane amount of water. Because it was never used the drain trap would always dry out, allowing stinky sewer gas into the room. I added a bit of baby oil to the drain, and since oil floats on water, it stopped the evaporation.

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  • Mr Frugal completed the lesson Mitres in the class Table Saw Class2 years ago
  • Mr Frugal commented on mikeasaurus's instructable 5 Ways to Remove a Stripped Screw2 years ago
    5 Ways to Remove a Stripped Screw

    Too funny! I was about to post the same comment in regards to Robertson/square drive screws. Not only are they less likely to cam out in the first place, they stay put on your driver when you are installing them. Every time I have to deal with messed up Phillips head screws, or install something that came them as part of the enclosed hardware, I curse Mr. Robertson for not cutting the deal with Henry Ford and his assembly line. In a way, it's similar to the Metric System. A far better solution that has been largely ignored by the 800lb gorilla; (also known as the USA).

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  • DIY: Stair Wall Lighting From Oak and LED Strips

    That is a valid question, and the OP never addressed it. Possibly because it's an Instructables unto itself, and I'm not sure on the rules here of posting DIY electrical work. It's also about four times as much work as just building these lights.Most stairways (at least in modern North American homes), are preconfigured with 120V lighting consisting two three way switches, one at top and one at the bottom of the stairs, and one, possibly two, octagon boxes typically mounted in the ceiling, that holds a light fixture(s). Getting line voltage to the wall lighting in the OP's layout using existing switches would typically require disconnecting the 120V feed to the existing lighting and rerouting it to the LED wall lights. It sounds simple enough, but since three way switches can be config...

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    That is a valid question, and the OP never addressed it. Possibly because it's an Instructables unto itself, and I'm not sure on the rules here of posting DIY electrical work. It's also about four times as much work as just building these lights.Most stairways (at least in modern North American homes), are preconfigured with 120V lighting consisting two three way switches, one at top and one at the bottom of the stairs, and one, possibly two, octagon boxes typically mounted in the ceiling, that holds a light fixture(s). Getting line voltage to the wall lighting in the OP's layout using existing switches would typically require disconnecting the 120V feed to the existing lighting and rerouting it to the LED wall lights. It sounds simple enough, but since three way switches can be configured multiple ways, it isn't necessarily so. In order to get a 120V line to the new fixtures, you will need to cut holes in the wall and pull wires. In a late 20th century home that means cutting into drywall and then patching and painting. In an early 20th century home, that means plaster over wood lath, and about five times as much work to repair, more if the wall is in mediocre shape or you are careless. The National Electrical Code in the USA and the Canadian Electrical Code also requires that all connections be made approved boxes, so those LED wall lights would need to be large enough to cover the box. As another commenter said, you could run 120V to one large power supply, which would have to be in an accessible place such as the basement, then run low voltage to switch(es) and the lighting. That would still require cutting into the walls to fish low voltage lines. You also would need to install new switches at the top and bottom of the stairs unless you disconnected any 120V line voltage coming into the boxes containing the existing switches and reused them. You cannot have 12V and line voltage in the same box, as it is extremely dangerous.I give full marks to the OP for his creativity on the build and the video. If your house had existing wall sconces and you wanted to change to these LED lights, it could be easily done. Otherwise, it's many hours of work, and if you aren't familiar with electrical codes, house construction and repairs, you possibly diving into the proverbial "opening the of can of worms".

    Another thing to be wary of is cheap PSU's. I recently installed some under cabinet LED strip lighting for a customer. I quoted him materials based on prices from Lee Valley, a Canadian supplier. He was somewhat concerned about the cost of materials, and I briefly pondered buying a suitable PSU from eBay that was 1/5th the cost of Lee Valley's. Then I did some research, and I found this article: http://www.edn.com/design/pc-board/4441830/Teardo...Best case scenario with that eBay junk; I have to replace the PSU after it fails. Second best scenario; I have to replace the PSU and all the LED strip lights after the PSU fry everything fails. Worst case scenario; his house burns to the ground. Needless to say the customer paid for the Lee Valley PSU.As a side note; the Lee Valley 120 LED/...

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    Another thing to be wary of is cheap PSU's. I recently installed some under cabinet LED strip lighting for a customer. I quoted him materials based on prices from Lee Valley, a Canadian supplier. He was somewhat concerned about the cost of materials, and I briefly pondered buying a suitable PSU from eBay that was 1/5th the cost of Lee Valley's. Then I did some research, and I found this article: http://www.edn.com/design/pc-board/4441830/Teardo...Best case scenario with that eBay junk; I have to replace the PSU after it fails. Second best scenario; I have to replace the PSU and all the LED strip lights after the PSU fry everything fails. Worst case scenario; his house burns to the ground. Needless to say the customer paid for the Lee Valley PSU.As a side note; the Lee Valley 120 LED/metre natural white strip lighting is fantastic! http://www.leevalley.com/en/hardware/page.aspx?ca... The colour temperature and the lumens are excellent for that application. I wish I'd done an Instructable on the installation, but it's hard to do when you are billing a client. :)

    Motion sensing three way switches are about ten times the cost of just a standard three way wall switch. I'm aways cautious where I install motion sensor switches. I don't like them for stairways because they often are tripped when you don't want the lights to turn on (such as passing them in a hallway for a night time pee), and, depending on the switches configuration, can be overridden and left in the 'off' position.

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