author

Nano_Burger

147
Inbox View Profile
28Instructables895,834Views132Comments

Tell us about yourself!

Achievements

100+ Comments Earned a bronze medal
10K+ Views Earned a bronze medal
Betabrand Belt Reuse Challenge
Contest Winner Runner Up in the Betabrand Belt Reuse Challenge
  • Modify Your Polaroid Spectra Camera to Use Non-Polaroid Film

    I do not see any problems with opening the camera with an outside battery. The camera doesn't care where the power comes from. The problem I do see is that I routed the powerbrick through the mouth of the film compartment of the camera. Since the film will be in there, that cannot happen. I'd drill some holes through the camera base to access the proper electrodes and connect the powerpack that way. You may have to peel back the cushioning foam of the bottom or not...you can just drill right through it. Looking at my camera, the base of the electrodes are on both sides of the tripod bushing but they are a little off center so make sure you shine a flashlight to see where they are. Even if you have to drill a few holes, it will not affect the functioning of the camera. Good luck!

    View Instructable »
  • Manage Your EOS Camera's Sticky Shutter

    Just wanted the community to know that this method seems to work for the Canon T90 camera as well. I recently fixed one with the familiar EEEE code. The problem does not leave the gooey streak on the shutter blades like the EOS 10s. However, digging into the bottom left part of the shutter box (from the back of the camera) liberated a lot of goo. After 45 minutes of work, I was able to get the shutter going again and the EEEE code went away. Hope this helps some folks out there! Cheers, NB

    View Instructable »
  • Develop Slide Film With C-41 Chemicals AKA E-6(-)

    Hi Nathan, I know that most black and white developers are meant to be used at room temp, but I decided to keep everything at E6/C41 temps. The density of the final product seemed OK, so that is what I will go with in the future. I think the chemistry is just making the developer more reactive. However, if normal B&W temps work for you, let me know so the community can benefit. Even without the antifogging agent, I think exposing the film to light is required. It is something that is easy to underdo, but impossible to overdo. I haven't had experience with Ektachrome yet, so please keep us informed. I need to get off my butt and start experimenting with this process again. I have not updated it in a while. Cheers...

    Hi Nathan, I know that most black and white developers are meant to be used at room temp, but I decided to keep everything at E6/C41 temps. The density of the final product seemed OK, so that is what I will go with in the future. I think the chemistry is just making the developer more reactive. However, if normal B&W temps work for you, let me know so the community can benefit. Even without the antifogging agent, I think exposing the film to light is required. It is something that is easy to underdo, but impossible to overdo. I haven't had experience with Ektachrome yet, so please keep us informed. I need to get off my butt and start experimenting with this process again. I have not updated it in a while. Cheers...

    Hi Nathan, I know that most black and white developers are meant to be used at room temp, but I decided to keep everything at E6/C41 temps. The density of the final product seemed OK, so that is what I will go with in the future. I think the chemistry is just making the developer more reactive. However, if normal B&W temps work for you, let me know so the community can benefit. Even without the antifogging agent, I think exposing the film to light is required. It is something that is easy to underdo, but impossible to overdo. I haven't had experience with Ektachrome yet, so please keep us informed. I need to get off my butt and start experimenting with this process again. I have not updated it in a while. Cheers...

    Hi Nathan, I know that most black and white developers are meant to be used at room temp, but I decided to keep everything at E6/C41 temps. The density of the final product seemed OK, so that is what I will go with in the future. I think the chemistry is just making the developer more reactive. However, if normal B&W temps work for you, let me know so the community can benefit. Even without the antifogging agent, I think exposing the film to light is required. It is something that is easy to underdo, but impossible to overdo. I haven't had experience with Ektachrome yet, so please keep us informed. I need to get off my butt and start experimenting with this process again. I have not updated it in a while. Cheers...

    View Instructable »
  • Develop Slide Film With C-41 Chemicals AKA E-6(-)

    Stock strength is just normal working strength for XTOL. That is, it is not diluted down to 1+1 or 1+10.

    View Instructable »
  • Nano_Burger's instructable Make Your Own Kiln Stilts's weekly stats:
    • Make Your Own Kiln Stilts
      114 views
      0 favorites
      1 comments
  • Sameera, Good point. I've lost my original camera in one of my many moves, so I'll try to redo this modification and include the video.

    View Instructable »
  • Ray, The flash cubes are two technological cycles ago. Flash cube-> Magic Cubes-> Electric strobe. So the only way to find them is to search through thrift shops and eBay. Amazingly, they seem to never expire unless they were stored in some moist environment. Usually, if I see some I pick them up so I have a hodgepodge stash of them. That said, there were millions made so it is just a matter of persistence. The camera does not need a flash cube if there is enough light, so maybe you could use it on nice sunny days until you can get your hands on a stash.

    View Instructable »
  • You are not going to have much luck with the Mark II. Unlike the mark I (the sandwich camera), it will only fire with the sprocket hole. I've had luck with loading cine film with sprocket holes, but you have to fire off two or three frames between shots (with the lens covered) so the frames won't overlap. Luckily, you can still get fresh 110 film from several companies if you want to go that route. I really like the Mark II. I feel it is as good or better than the Pentax Auto 110. The zoom means you don't have to change lenses like the Pentax. Because it is beefier, I like the feel better than the Pentax as well.

    View Instructable »
  • Looks like you are getting great results. If you tweak the developing process, please update the community here. It would be nice to have a bunch of data points to work with. The "getting the film back on the reel" problem is a little easier with steel reels. Or alternatively, you could just wait until the film and reels are dry. There is no timeframe between fogging and the rest of the process although getting it done in one session has its appeal.

    View Instructable »
  • This brings me back to my soap making days. It does not take long to have a lifetime supply of soap! I'd emphasize the safety aspects though. Rubber gloves, goggles, and an apron are required when handling hot and caustic liquids. Also, your immersion blender will not be able to be used for anything ecept soap making after that.

    View Instructable »
  • Nano_Burger commented on randofo's instructable Ring Modulator Pedal

    And what would a human voice sound like modulated through this device?

    View Instructable »
  • Jon, You are getting great results! I've let my interest in this project flag recently, but your results may get me back to the darkroom. I have some 70mm slide film that nobody will develop, so it may be up to me.

    View Instructable »
  • Anned, I did a instructable on the N9000 that will cover how to get inside the camera. Not that difficult. Here is the link:https://www.instructables.com/id/Bulb-i-fy-Your-Nishika-N9000/

    View Instructable »
  • OK.1. Take the film out and leave the back of the camera open.2. Try to advance the film with the lever (don't force).3. If it does not advance, look through the septums in the camera and press the shutter release. Did you hear a click? Did you see light through the lenses? If you did, try the film advance.4. If you didn't see either, the shutter is jammed. You will have to open up the camera and clean/actuate the shutter. Follow the instructions in step 3 to get to the shutter mechanism. Clean and manipulate the shutter mechanism with some lighter fluid (naphtha). Once you have the shutter working properly, the winder problem should resolve itself. Good luck!

    View Instructable »
  • Curious....the film advance is a pretty robust mechanism. I assume the film isn't jammed in the film can since you have to pull out a generous leader to load. If the film didn't catch on the take-up sprocket, you would have no problem advancing the mechanism even if the film isn't moving. The only thing I can think of is that the mechanism is somehow in between cycles and not completing the cycle as it should.I'd take the film out and play with the mechanism a few times. Wind, shoot, wind etc. Hopefully, it will free up whatever is jamming the mechanism. If you can't get it to work, you might want to open the camera up and see if you can fix it, but I'd recommend just buying a new one on eBay. These don't command high prices, however if you have the time, break out the small screwd…

    see more »

    Curious....the film advance is a pretty robust mechanism. I assume the film isn't jammed in the film can since you have to pull out a generous leader to load. If the film didn't catch on the take-up sprocket, you would have no problem advancing the mechanism even if the film isn't moving. The only thing I can think of is that the mechanism is somehow in between cycles and not completing the cycle as it should.I'd take the film out and play with the mechanism a few times. Wind, shoot, wind etc. Hopefully, it will free up whatever is jamming the mechanism. If you can't get it to work, you might want to open the camera up and see if you can fix it, but I'd recommend just buying a new one on eBay. These don't command high prices, however if you have the time, break out the small screwdrivers!

    View Instructable »
  • The photo sandwich will come through the rollers, breaking the reagent pack and spreading the reagent between the photo and negative. It should operate like any other peel apart Polaroid camera. The paper tab, when pulled will cause the photo sandwich tab to appear between the rollers. If it does not, you may have to adjust the tension on the springs that hold the pack in the camera. Sometimes, these can be pretty stiff and impede the photo coming out in the correct fashion. You can see the spring here. It is the metal spring right above the "Keep Rollers Clean" warning. Good luck!

    View Instructable »
  • Any 35mm film with sprocket holes will do. Without a flash, I'd stick to outdoor scenes. I'd stick to 400 ISO film as a go to film with this camera.

    View Instructable »
  • Ronnie, Thanks for the tips! Always appreciated. It looks like you joined Instructables just to reply...so I know your tips are high quality!I've moved recently, so I have not tried this technique in some time, but will as soon as I can burn through a roll of C-41. What is your opinion on sunlight for fogging? Some suggest that it can lead to color shifts, but you seem to say that it is required for d-max? Does UV play a significant role or is tungsten OK??

    I meant E-6 of course 8-/

    View Instructable »
  • Thinner is better. The scanner has a very limited focus range, so I think foam core material may be too thick. The material I used was essentially black card stock....a heavy paper. I'd go with the poster paper!

    View Instructable »
      • Meatloaf
      • Falafel
      • African peanut soup (slow cooker)
  • Hey, thanks for the comments. I made these with the instructable motif as a proof of principle. If anyone wants one of these "limited edition" coins, just instructable-mail me your address. One will easily fit into an envelope and I'll take care of the minimal postage...even overseas (places other than Texas). I have about 20 left (the rest were randomly dropped around Manhattan on a visit there). If they are popular, I can always make another round! Cheers!

    View Instructable »
  • Sorry, I see that the sculpture is a biorock installation...nice!

    Would the transplants survive better with a biorock installation? From what I understand, it would mean putting a low voltage current through the rebar.

    View Instructable »
  • Sure, they should be just as light tight as a regular pack. Since they are out of the factory foil package, I'd store the pack in a heavy duty quart freezer ziplock bag. This will protect it from dust, moisture and mechanical damage. If you could find them in black...all the better 8-)

    View Instructable »
  • Nano_Burger's instructable Make Your Own Challenge Coin's weekly stats:
    • Make Your Own Challenge Coin
      9,486 views
      147 favorites
      7 comments
      • Embossed Message on Ceramic Gift for Special Celebration
      • Ceramic Raku Drawing in a Wooden Frame
  • If someone wants them for this conversion or a conversation piece...fine. However, Even under ideal storage conditions, those film packs are long dead for their original purpose. They will not produce an image.

    View Instructable »
  • Ahhh, the old Pleaser! Probably has not pleased anyone in quite a while! I don't think that you could really convert a Pleaser to pack film. It was an integral type instant camera, not a peel apart instant camera. I've converted a Kodak instant camera to a cut film camera, but the results were not that great and was not worth the effort. Better to have it as a decorative object or doorstop 8-)

    View Instructable »