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1Instructables1,190Views27CommentsAbbotsford, BC, CanadaJoined January 2nd, 2011
I'm Norm, a Heavy Duty Mechanic, teacher and a lot of other stuff. Machinist, welder, experimenter, woodworker, home renovator, news and political junkie and generous curmudgeon.

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  • Natural Pest Control for Your Garden!

    Absolutely lovely. Simplest is best.Thank you.

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  • Norm1958 commented on Peterthinking's instructable $26 Fire Ladder2 months ago
    $26 Fire Ladder

    Thank you for this. I've been thinking about this for some time. We have an elderly wooden house with no plastic siding or chipboard sheathing thank goodness but you still worry. Once a house gets going on fire, there is little escape especially from the upper floor[s] since most fires start on lower floors.I'm going to follow your pattern but try plastic pipe for convenience. See how it works.Just a note of interest: Staying in China at a modern hotel with all the safety bells and whistles/alarms/sprinklers/exits you will find a box beneath the exterior window which contains a rope, stanchions to attach it to and instructions in English on how to bail out of the building if necessary.

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  • Norm1958 commented on darbinorvar's instructable Jig for Cutting Perfect Crown Molding2 months ago
    Jig for Cutting Perfect Crown Molding

    Thank you for this video, your solution to a problem is brilliant in it's simplicity.Having renovated some old houses I can say crown molding is for covering big gaps in corners that are never square or straight or plumb. Accurate measurement is difficult.With this simple jig you have a secure way to hold the material in a way that presents the material in the way it will be installed, so you don't have to flip the cuts over in your head which frequently leads to errors on a Saturday afternoon. If the place is crooked, cut the bits a little long and fit them with a block plane or coping saw after this brilliantly simple jig has done the hard work safely and put you into the finishing arena.

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  • Norm1958 commented on Not_Tasha's instructable New England Style Roast Beef Sandwiches4 months ago
    New England Style Roast Beef Sandwiches

    Rest.Do your best.Don't be ashamed to rest.Thank you for the recipe.

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  • Norm1958 commented on Mastering Me's instructable Easy Life-Saving Water Filter5 months ago
    Easy Life-Saving Water Filter

    Oops, sorry I meant instructable.

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  • Norm1958 commented on Mastering Me's instructable Easy Life-Saving Water Filter5 months ago
    Easy Life-Saving Water Filter

    Perhaps you should re-read your post. You probably got sick from bacterial runoff, animal poop., manure on fields, maybe even human sewage sprayed on the fields which can contain anything. Perhaps a small filter such as this MIGHT have prevented your suffering.

    Picky, picky, picky

    This is an emergency filter.This type of filter, the "Slow Sand Filter" isn't perfect, and it is slow.Is it better than nothing? YesIt can be improved by increasing the filter depth, hence the "Slow Sand" moniker.Make it better? Add diameter for volume and depth for fineness of filtration.As it gets used, it will form a bio-layer on top which both improves and slows filtration.As someone else mentioned, this can and must be removed by back flush or replacing the top layer of material which sadly loses the beneficial bio-film and the process takes time to start again.I sense a lot of the comments are critical because this doesn't represent a perfect large scale water filtration system. Remember please remember this is two pop bottles, using available material [sand] t...

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    This is an emergency filter.This type of filter, the "Slow Sand Filter" isn't perfect, and it is slow.Is it better than nothing? YesIt can be improved by increasing the filter depth, hence the "Slow Sand" moniker.Make it better? Add diameter for volume and depth for fineness of filtration.As it gets used, it will form a bio-layer on top which both improves and slows filtration.As someone else mentioned, this can and must be removed by back flush or replacing the top layer of material which sadly loses the beneficial bio-film and the process takes time to start again.I sense a lot of the comments are critical because this doesn't represent a perfect large scale water filtration system. Remember please remember this is two pop bottles, using available material [sand] to at least clarify water in case of emergency.Many years ago I saw this system used on a large scale and quite accepted, filters out bacteria.Now everyone is so paranoid of everything no one will ever be happy with any system.I hope one day, if you are stuck on a sandy beach with only plastic pop bottles and a muddy water source you remember this video.If you happen to have chlorine or iodine to disinfect the water, lucky you.If you can build a wood fire, boil the water and throw some carbon into the filter, lucky you.If you have enough pop bottles and sunshine you can build a small distillation plant.

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  • Norm1958 commented on Mastering Me's instructable Easy Life-Saving Water Filter5 months ago
    Easy Life-Saving Water Filter

    This filter will remove sediment and given time to will filter out bacteria. You are right, chemical and viral contamination are another matter.Mind you, the bleach will knock out most viruses. Off the top of my head I can only think of distillation as a simple way to ensure pure water but maybe a bunch of plain [not self starting petroleum saturated] BBQ charcoal briquettes would add to the final filtration.

    Consumer bleach is pretty much the same, the difference being the cheap stuff is maybe 3%, the premium stuff 4% or so. Read the bottle, if using the cheap stuff, add and extra 1/3 perhaps.If you smell bleach in the filtered water you can leave it sit in a vented container until the bleach evaporates, overnight is usually enough. Just like city water.

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  • Norm1958 commented on Thunderstruck Studios's instructable Rubens' Tube With Theremin6 months ago
    Rubens' Tube With Theremin

    Great food for thought.Perhaps it's already been done, but I envision a gas fireplace that dances according to music being played.

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  • Norm1958 commented on EjeeBee's instructable A Cabin in the Yukon8 months ago
    A Cabin in the Yukon

    Love it, magnificent job.

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  • Norm1958 commented on Phil B's instructable Low Tech Inclinometer 8 months ago
    Low Tech Inclinometer

    Thank Goodness there are people out there building simple, useful, reliable things.Thank you for the idea and sharing..

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  • Outdoor Kitchen - Casting Concrete Worktop With Curved Edges

    I love it, great help and inspiration.

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  • Robotic Helmet That Stops You From Crying

    One word: Astounding.

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  • Norm1958 commented on Metal_maestro's instructable Shop Cheats: Welder's Brake1 year ago
    Shop Cheats: Welder's Brake

    A nice description of how to bend metal with limited resources and interesting comments. I work on heavy equipment and without the 40 foot long 200 ton [exaggeration] press brake this is the way to do it.If you encounter cracking and/or lack of penetration use the following as necessary:- Heat the bends red [before bending]- weld the outside bend as a sealer- crank up the heat and weld the inside as hot as you can from middle to ends - remember as you near the end of the weld it will get hotter. - Overlap the weld starting points - Overlap the weld onto the uncut material..- Flip it over, grind out your seal weld down to metal and pour on a hot pass to boil out the crud.- Heat the whole joint red and let it cool and grind as necessary.This applies to mild steel. Alloys [T1, AR for examp...

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    A nice description of how to bend metal with limited resources and interesting comments. I work on heavy equipment and without the 40 foot long 200 ton [exaggeration] press brake this is the way to do it.If you encounter cracking and/or lack of penetration use the following as necessary:- Heat the bends red [before bending]- weld the outside bend as a sealer- crank up the heat and weld the inside as hot as you can from middle to ends - remember as you near the end of the weld it will get hotter. - Overlap the weld starting points - Overlap the weld onto the uncut material..- Flip it over, grind out your seal weld down to metal and pour on a hot pass to boil out the crud.- Heat the whole joint red and let it cool and grind as necessary.This applies to mild steel. Alloys [T1, AR for example] require more procedure.Thank you for bring this topic up.

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  • Norm1958 commented on jpetrach's instructable Overview 1 year ago
    Overview

    Sadly, silica sand cuts the best as it has sharp edges and as mentioned is most dangerous. Glass bead are essentially silica so it's the same thing, but, here is the but: keep the air pressure down to where the glass beads don't shatter and cause dust. 30psi maybe. Sadly at this pressure the process is slow and being human we want things fast so we crank it up and shatter the beads creating silica dust and convince ourselves it's ok because glass beads are safe.There are other "media", walnut shells come to mind. Slow but probably safe for the lungs.

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  • Modern Platform Bed // Hand Tools + Framing Lumber

    What a beautiful project, it's beautiful in simplicity, eye appeal, utility and use of resources.Which brings me my points: - there is no sin in using cheap materials. Buy standard grade construction stuff , bring it inside and let it dry out for a month or two and build something really nice. It doesn't have to be oak and it will be far better than "oak patterned plastic veneer over chipboard"! In addition, frequently when I go to HD I see 2*4's so bowed you could build a boat out of them and I am tempted to try. Just an idea.- squeaking can be a problem but a coating of pliable construction caulk/adhesive where the pieces meet helps a lot. Silicone works well but it's really hard/impossible to remove the excess without leaving a film and it won't take any finish at all

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  • Norm1958 commented on Norm1958's instructable Kenmore Washer Timer Knob1 year ago
    Kenmore Washer Timer Knob

    Your right about something showing up after you need it, as well you always need something right after throwing it out!As for JB Weld, it has it's place in an emergency and from my 40 years of experience that's about it. I'm not criticizing JB Weld, it is a high quality epoxy but people expect too much from it.

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  • Norm1958 commented on lonesoulsurfer's instructable Simple Mini Fire Piston1 year ago
    Simple Mini Fire Piston

    As my old buddy used to say, simplest is usually best. Your project proves it.To jump into the "Great O-ring Debate" the lubricant used depends on the o-ring material. The silicone plumbers/dielectric/brake assembly/o-ring lube is probably safe for most o-rings noting that some o-ring lubes swell the o-ring on purpose for a better static seal. General purpose black industrial o-rings are usually a synthetic rubber called nitrile or buna-n and using pretty much any oil or grease on them is ok. O-rings made for automotive brakes require a non petroleum base lubricant such as the silicone lube or vegetable oil. Silicone o-rings and o-rings for air conditioning would probably not be good choices as they are soft and don't do dynamic[moving] sealing for long. I don't know what plum...

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    As my old buddy used to say, simplest is usually best. Your project proves it.To jump into the "Great O-ring Debate" the lubricant used depends on the o-ring material. The silicone plumbers/dielectric/brake assembly/o-ring lube is probably safe for most o-rings noting that some o-ring lubes swell the o-ring on purpose for a better static seal. General purpose black industrial o-rings are usually a synthetic rubber called nitrile or buna-n and using pretty much any oil or grease on them is ok. O-rings made for automotive brakes require a non petroleum base lubricant such as the silicone lube or vegetable oil. Silicone o-rings and o-rings for air conditioning would probably not be good choices as they are soft and don't do dynamic[moving] sealing for long. I don't know what plumbing o-rings are made of but I suspect both nitrile and other things depending on application.The best thing to do is try. If the o-ring seems to get soft and swell or dry out and shrink and crack prematurely your using the wrong lube for the o-ring. O-rings also come in different hardness. If you choose one too soft it will wear out fast in dynamic[moving] application. If you choose one too hard it won't be flexible enough to deform under pressure and seal the pipe, especially at cold temperatures. Might have to keep the mechanism warm in your pocket until you need it. From experience I know that an everyday nitrile 70 durometer hardness o-ring is stiff as a frozen stick at -20f and won't seal anything. 90 durometer is even worse at cold temps.Sorry for the lecture, the project is beautiful in it's simplicity and usefulness. I applaud the author.

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  • Brilliant Angle Nail Trick From Old Carpenter

    Contrary to all the technical and critical advice I would like to say thank you.It's a great trick when there isn't room to swing back your hammer, and that happens a lot when you build every day.I would like to see anybody pull a 2x4 out of a plate with 3 of these nails in it, maybe not technically perfect but a Hell of a struggle.

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  • Norm1958 commented on mikeasaurus's instructable Unusual Uses for WD-401 year ago
    Unusual Uses for WD-40

    Having been a mechanic for 40 years and lived in Northern BC for 20+ I can tell you using WD40 as a hand cleaner works really well especially when it's -40 and everything water based is frozen. As for arthritis, it is fairly popular with the old folks and I'm getting to the stage to try it. Just for comparison, some people use [real] turpentine for their joints.My unusual uses for WD are: 1] starting diesel engines rather than using ether. You have to shoot it in after the air filter and preferably right into the turbo or intake manifold. I'm told the propellant is propane and with the volatile solvent and light oil it ignites well and much gentler than ether. 2] As cutting oil for drilling steel, it seems to work well. Handy, nice finishes and good tool life.

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  • How to Cook a McDonalds Big Mac (But Better)

    I love it. Now a days In Canada we are so scared of fat 30% is considered obscene,I don't think you can even buy it made in stores. Adding bacon is brilliant, I see bacon taking it to a new level. "It's all in the sauce" someone once said. I must say this sauce is as good as any but it's a matter of taste and we are free to mix it up.I grew up on fat ground beef, it browns the patty well in a pan and the drippings are to die for. I'm pushing sixty, 5'9 and weigh 165 so it can't be that bad.

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  • HAND FORGED Cold Chisel, From a Rusty Old Coil Spring

    I love the chisel shape, just perfect for so many jobs the common chisel isn't.I would like to add my 2 bits about heat treating a chisel: I prefer a chisel with the striking end a little hard so it doesn't mushroom so much.What works for me is quenching the whole chisel to make it hard and then "drawing it back" aka "tempering". After hardening you polish so you can see the colours and heat the middle up gently with a torch, playing it around until you get the straw colour on the cutting end and a deeper colour on the striking end. Don't heat the middle red, or even deep blue because you will notice a "springiness" when hammering, the middle needs to be a bit hard also.Spring steel was a good choice, high carbon and alloyed for "repetitive" sho...

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    I love the chisel shape, just perfect for so many jobs the common chisel isn't.I would like to add my 2 bits about heat treating a chisel: I prefer a chisel with the striking end a little hard so it doesn't mushroom so much.What works for me is quenching the whole chisel to make it hard and then "drawing it back" aka "tempering". After hardening you polish so you can see the colours and heat the middle up gently with a torch, playing it around until you get the straw colour on the cutting end and a deeper colour on the striking end. Don't heat the middle red, or even deep blue because you will notice a "springiness" when hammering, the middle needs to be a bit hard also.Spring steel was a good choice, high carbon and alloyed for "repetitive" shock loading, like hammering.When using plain carbon steels like 1045 such as the stuff hydraulic cylinder rods are made, the hardening temp is really important. Don't push it beyond the lower end of the magnet test or you won't get full hardness, [which is fine if you don't want full hardness]. Saves a tempering step. Generally plain carbons are quenched in water for full shock value to get maximum hardness. Oil quench can be used which results in less hardness. A quench of water with oil on top gives a quench between the two if you are having trouble with cracking You can make a pretty good chisel out of 1045, follow the above advise.Axle steels such as 4140 and 4340 are different in that 4140 is usually oil quenched. 4340 because of it's alloys is "air hardening" in that it hardens on cooling in air. Quenching using oil or water in order of severity:-For maximum quench use water, circulate water and add salt if you want more cooling- Water with some oil on top, reduces shock wave and cracking-Oil- minimizes cracking depending on the oil used and you get really cool flames- Air cool- some steels [4340 for example] harden at air temperature, they can be modified through heat treatment, another topic for another day.That's my 14 bits.

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