author
6Instructables22,493Views399CommentsJoined March 15th, 2015

Tell us about yourself!

Complete Your Profile

Achievements

100+ Comments Earned a bronze medal
10K+ Views Earned a bronze medal
Earring Challenge
Contest Winner Runner Up in the Earring Challenge
Show 1 More »
  • Hi,If the purpose is anti skid, gravel is a possibility, perhaps break it up if it builds up..Heating would be expensive. How expensive can be calculated by knowing minimum temperatures, amount of snow (water) per hour or day, for starters, it takes 1 calorie to heat up 1 gram of water 1°C.Calories can be converted into Watt needed and luckily, a heating element is 100% efficient, but I think it would be prohibitively expensive..Best solution would be to keep the snow from landing on porch/stairs of course, but that would take some sort of roof over the entire area, possibly with sides as well - like you would make a carport - would take some thought to not uglify your house. Could be made like a pergola for flowers during summer, with some roofing plates to put up during winter..In cas...

    see more »

    Hi,If the purpose is anti skid, gravel is a possibility, perhaps break it up if it builds up..Heating would be expensive. How expensive can be calculated by knowing minimum temperatures, amount of snow (water) per hour or day, for starters, it takes 1 calorie to heat up 1 gram of water 1°C.Calories can be converted into Watt needed and luckily, a heating element is 100% efficient, but I think it would be prohibitively expensive..Best solution would be to keep the snow from landing on porch/stairs of course, but that would take some sort of roof over the entire area, possibly with sides as well - like you would make a carport - would take some thought to not uglify your house. Could be made like a pergola for flowers during summer, with some roofing plates to put up during winter..In case you would build something, anything at all, better ride out this winter and make it a summer project..Had the house and porch been stone a weed burner might help, but very risky with wood..Nice house, looks spaceous (said the guy in a one room flat).Hope you find a dog friendly solution :)

    View Instructable »
  • At what current?Even better, tell us what you're trying to attempt and it will be easier to find the best solution..The short answer would be a buck converter.

    View Instructable »
  • Hi,.Does it really matter what you call a tech contest, when you accept stuff that is not in the definition?.The recent "Electronics Tips" had less than a handful of what can be honestly categorized as tips, the rest was just a random mess of electronics builds (or rather, mostly some pre-build eBay items strung together), lacking any tips..In general, I think it would be good if you had the capacity to really judge tech items, as I have seen quite a number of either dangerous, non functional, "glue ups" from ready made stuff and blatant "lifting" from other peoples web sites, make it into the finals of several contests over the years..Likewise, but out of your hands of course, I'd like people who posts tech projects to actually understand their project, r...

    see more »

    Hi,.Does it really matter what you call a tech contest, when you accept stuff that is not in the definition?.The recent "Electronics Tips" had less than a handful of what can be honestly categorized as tips, the rest was just a random mess of electronics builds (or rather, mostly some pre-build eBay items strung together), lacking any tips..In general, I think it would be good if you had the capacity to really judge tech items, as I have seen quite a number of either dangerous, non functional, "glue ups" from ready made stuff and blatant "lifting" from other peoples web sites, make it into the finals of several contests over the years..Likewise, but out of your hands of course, I'd like people who posts tech projects to actually understand their project, rather than the great number, where it is painfully clear that the poster struggled to make it and now want to tell others how to do it - wonder how the school system would look if it was run this way, but luckily, they still demands educated teachers with knowledge that surpasses the immediate curriculum.Have a nice day :)

    View Instructable »
  • Hi,.You're certainly not alone on this one!The fun part for me will always be the brain-work and lacking a machine shop, doesn't help a bit - there's only so much you can do on your lap or on a kitchen table..I used to be a member of some clubs at the local uni (electronics, wood and metal) and had access to "everything", but while it certainly helped to be only 5 minutes away (before I moved), I still build up a lot of "in transition" projects. When you cracked it, having an apprentice would be nice to do the monkey work :)That said, I keep going back to those, as they're sometimes just being delayed until I get the right tools and/or materials..Solving the puzzle is where I find most satisfaction, while the execution is more of "told you I could do it" an...

    see more »

    Hi,.You're certainly not alone on this one!The fun part for me will always be the brain-work and lacking a machine shop, doesn't help a bit - there's only so much you can do on your lap or on a kitchen table..I used to be a member of some clubs at the local uni (electronics, wood and metal) and had access to "everything", but while it certainly helped to be only 5 minutes away (before I moved), I still build up a lot of "in transition" projects. When you cracked it, having an apprentice would be nice to do the monkey work :)That said, I keep going back to those, as they're sometimes just being delayed until I get the right tools and/or materials..Solving the puzzle is where I find most satisfaction, while the execution is more of "told you I could do it" and I don't really feel that need..Having several projects at different stages of finish, gives you the benefit to choose, what you wanna continue on, at any particular time, so I don't view it as failure, but rather that I get more done that way.Finally, my creative side comes in waves, some weeks I use 10 to 20 A4 pages a day, while at other times I just stare at the blank paper and hence go to the more physical side of projects.I store most half transitioned projects in plastic boxes, together with parts and jigs made for it (sometimes tools as well), so I don't have to search for the stuff once more..Have a nice day :)

    View Instructable »
  • Hi,.Unfortunately it will be impossible to synch to the take-up spool.Even if successful in getting it to go at the perfect rate, it will build up an error that makes it go haywire in a short time.To get a level wind all the way from empty to full, the mechanism doing it must be synchronized to the take-up spool, which is exactly what a level wind mechanism is all about..Have a nice day :)

    View Instructable »
  • Hi,.It sounds like you're trying to reinvent the wheel, or at least a Level Wind mechanism?Plenty exists, from thread winding on e-spinners over some types of fishing reels to huge ones for seriously heavy steel wire cables.The mechanism is easily made with a diamond shaft (name refers to the diamond shaped grooves it has got) and a runner that traverses back and forth between the ends, driven from the main rotation with an amount of gear reduction dictated by thread diameter.Other means exists, but you will be better able to select a method, knowing the right words and googling a bit.https://www.google.com/search?q=level+wind+mechani....Have a nice day :)

    View Instructable »
  • Omnivent commented on oahmad123's instructable Doorbell LED4 weeks ago
    Doorbell LED

    Hi,.The discrepancy between voltmeter and 'scope is probably that your voltmeter doesn't show "True RMS", but just tries to approximate it. If a DVM doesn't say "True RMS" somewhere on the front, it isn't (and I've even seen DVM claiming so, but couldn't live up to it.Having a 'scope is a life saver in such situations..Another thing is, that you'll often get a higher voltage when unloaded, if it's a doorbell transformer, as they're wound to handle a short circuit (high impedance vinding)..Have a nice day :)

    View Instructable »
  • Omnivent commented on Jugaad it yourself's instructable DIY LED Ring Light4 weeks ago
    DIY  LED Ring Light

    Hi,Seems you could have kept to 5 of the 5W LEDs or so, as you only feed it with around 24W.The color temperature shifts, the more you limit the current, the more it shifts.Have a nice day :)

    View Instructable »
  • Wallace Autonomous Robot - Part 4 - Add IR Distance and "Amp" Sensors

    Hi again,I dug up a sensor and measured a bit on it. It was a Sharp GP2D12 (bought around 1999-2001, but I bet the "motor" in them are pretty similar, as it's a single chip solution containing both modulation and the sensor line)..Sharp GP2D12:All measurements taken directly at the power terminals of the GP2D12 with a fast 'scope..Modulation: ~40ms bursts, each made up of 32 LED pulses with a repetition rate of 1ms and around 9ms of inter-burst pause..Each pulse (LED on time) is ~130µs)..With no capacitor, each edge of the pulse is very noise ridden, with a potential to screw up digital circuitry in no time flat:Leading edge pulses to under 3V, then up to ~5.5V and dies in a dampened ringing ending at ~1.1V..1.2V under Vdd (While the LED is on).Trailing edge (LED extinguishing...

    see more »

    Hi again,I dug up a sensor and measured a bit on it. It was a Sharp GP2D12 (bought around 1999-2001, but I bet the "motor" in them are pretty similar, as it's a single chip solution containing both modulation and the sensor line)..Sharp GP2D12:All measurements taken directly at the power terminals of the GP2D12 with a fast 'scope..Modulation: ~40ms bursts, each made up of 32 LED pulses with a repetition rate of 1ms and around 9ms of inter-burst pause..Each pulse (LED on time) is ~130µs)..With no capacitor, each edge of the pulse is very noise ridden, with a potential to screw up digital circuitry in no time flat:Leading edge pulses to under 3V, then up to ~5.5V and dies in a dampened ringing ending at ~1.1V..1.2V under Vdd (While the LED is on).Trailing edge (LED extinguishing) starts with a fast pulse to more than 15V, then down to around 2V and fading into Vdd in a (less than pretty) dampened ringing..A 10µF ceramic (i.e. low ESR) capacitor directly at the power terminals of the GP2D12 removed the spiking (up/down), but wasn't able to keep the power terminals at Vdd during LED pulses (of course).Alternatives to 10µF ceramic could be 10µF _solid_ tantalum, or ~22µF regular tantalum (the latter with a shorter life cycle though).Pics (1..5 with no cap):1 Full burst2 Single pulse3 Leading edge of LED pulse4 Trailing edge of LED pulse5 A handful of pulses6 A handful of pulses with a 10µF ceramic cap directly over the power terminalsApart from the cap, twisting the wires to your power source (around 1 twist each 10mm or so and kept as short as practically possible (keeping the inductance of the supply wires low that way will help) and don't run them in parallel with motor supply wires. Power taken directly from the SLA is good, as that means low impedance :)Hope everything plays out well for you :)

    View Instructable »
  • Running Average for Your Microcontroller Projects

    Hi,.Depending on your data set (and the purpose of the output), you should look into a running exponential decay, which keeps the newest data to have most impact (still in the running fashion)..And beyond that, look up other statistical tools. Statistics may sound dorky and boring to the uninitiated, but will put you a good bit higher in programming anything that needs to act on data streams..Have a nice day :)

    View Instructable »
  • Omnivent commented on jenfoxbot's instructable A Beginner's Guide to Microcontrollers3 months ago
    A Beginner's Guide to Microcontrollers

    Hi,Yes, it's impossible to know them all, considering the speed at which new variants hit the market. For a hobbyist, it's better to just go with a few models, which also makes it easier to get good prices from large(-ish) orders. Buying e.g. PIC10F chips from MicroChipDirect can get you like.3 to 4 chips/$ when you buy them by the hundreds (and you do, as their quite steep shipping fee is probably meant to scare off those who aren't serious ;)The ever changing landscape of microcontrollers also means new programming chains (if you look outside Arduinos and such).I won't turn this into a "hey, you missed ARM etc.", but I do have a few corrections though:Arduinos, Pi's etc. are microcontroller _boards_A _breakout board_ is a PCB that makes it easier to use SMD chips of any kind...

    see more »

    Hi,Yes, it's impossible to know them all, considering the speed at which new variants hit the market. For a hobbyist, it's better to just go with a few models, which also makes it easier to get good prices from large(-ish) orders. Buying e.g. PIC10F chips from MicroChipDirect can get you like.3 to 4 chips/$ when you buy them by the hundreds (and you do, as their quite steep shipping fee is probably meant to scare off those who aren't serious ;)The ever changing landscape of microcontrollers also means new programming chains (if you look outside Arduinos and such).I won't turn this into a "hey, you missed ARM etc.", but I do have a few corrections though:Arduinos, Pi's etc. are microcontroller _boards_A _breakout board_ is a PCB that makes it easier to use SMD chips of any kind. (e.g. in a solderless breadboard).The forerunner to microcontrollers we called Minimum Systems, which held CPU, (UVEP)ROM and RAM, with optional periferal adapter and Timer-Counter chips etc. for special functions, some of them smaller than the larger Arduinos (and packed so hard that there was no place for a speck of dust ;).A microcontroller is not a one-job chip either, just like with a (single core) CPU - The early pre-Windows PC's could run one job at a time, then along came Win 1,0 and all computer guys had a ROFL moment. Around Win 3.1 it started to look usable for multitasking, but it was really just a shell for (MS/PC)DOS.Software can add multitasking to all but the smallest microcontrollers - just add a RTOS or build your software with State Machines for simulated or Time Slice multitasking (and you even have multi-kernal microcontrollers that are born for multitasking (The Propellor is an early-ish example), although I personally prefer to just add the amount of microcontrollers needed, to make both the hardware and the software handling easier and modular.(Master/Slave setup)..Have a nice day :)

    View Instructable »
  • Omnivent commented on Alex in NZ's instructable Curved Surface Paint Scraper4 months ago
    Curved Surface Paint Scraper

    Wow, that is expensive. The local (Denmark) "discount" tool shops sells the round blades for the equivalent of around NZ$18.5 (which I still think is expensive for what they do).Wish we were neighbors, city life is a high price to be near the goods you only need occasionally.Enjoy your Paradise lucky guy :)

    View Instructable »
  • Omnivent commented on Alex in NZ's instructable Curved Surface Paint Scraper4 months ago
    Curved Surface Paint Scraper

    Hi,.Just FYI, You're probably set for the job at hand, but any well assorted tool shop should be able to sell you a round/circular carbide blade for the Bacho 625 scraper (or buy the scraper with triangle, round, pear- or drop shaped carbide blade). Not the cheapest, but carbide tools are never cheap and even if you don't like the very ergonomic handles, you can get the blades in one-off..Wouldn't use a steel scraper blade since I got my first (flat) Bacho carbide blade and my 625 is always within reach, as I beat it up on lots of jobs that need a scratch and a scrape..Have a nicew day :)

    View Instructable »
  • Omnivent commented on TinkeringProductions's instructable Iron on Pixelated Patches4 months ago
    Iron on Pixelated Patches

    Hi,Not sure if it's possible to go directly to a heavy Vlies with one side iron-on only, but it would save you some applique time, so maybe worth a try?.Have a nice day :)

    View Instructable »
  • Omnivent commented on Heatmizer717's instructable Paint Organized With Lids4 months ago
    Paint Organized With Lids

    Hi,Have been doing this for decades, when my ready-made palettes all need a wash, although I prefer white lids as they better show the color (and I remove the ring that goes inside the threads, as that is a nuisance that makes the usable area smaller).."you can help save the planet by repurposing plastics and metals."A bold but not entirely correct statement, unless you keep them out of the dumpster forever.The plastic palettes with hemispheric "dimples" are very easy to clean and reuse, I have some that are more than 30 years, so their impact on our planet is way below the impact of bottle lids. Lids with all their nooks and crannies are hard work to clean, so I mostly consider those one-shots. When painting miniatures, my left thumb nail is my preferred palette th...

    see more »

    Hi,Have been doing this for decades, when my ready-made palettes all need a wash, although I prefer white lids as they better show the color (and I remove the ring that goes inside the threads, as that is a nuisance that makes the usable area smaller).."you can help save the planet by repurposing plastics and metals."A bold but not entirely correct statement, unless you keep them out of the dumpster forever.The plastic palettes with hemispheric "dimples" are very easy to clean and reuse, I have some that are more than 30 years, so their impact on our planet is way below the impact of bottle lids. Lids with all their nooks and crannies are hard work to clean, so I mostly consider those one-shots. When painting miniatures, my left thumb nail is my preferred palette though :).Have a nice day :)

    View Instructable »
  • How to Design Custom, 3D Printable Braces for Arm Injury

    Hi,Probably the best use of a 3D-printer I have seen in a long time - Too bad I don't have one - I'm sure you could make good "sleeping braces" to counter carpal tunnel syndrome better than my idea of 2 pieces of plywood bound with string as a sandwich (but I'm afraid to karate-chop something in my sleep, so it only exists on paper and probably hard to tie the second hand as well ;)Nice, very nice job.Have a nice day :)

    View Instructable »
  • Omnivent commented on witnessmenow's instructable Lightpipe 7-Segment Display4 months ago
    Lightpipe 7-Segment Display

    Nice jobFor even better light, you could sand the pipes lightly (say 300-400 grit) or steel wool and the light will disperse more evenly - Test on a single piece first and see if you like it.Have a nice day :)

    View Instructable »
  • Omnivent commented on Electro maker's instructable How to Connect Led Light to Ac Power4 months ago
    How to Connect Led Light to Ac Power

    Hi,.You _did_ write that this circuit is dangerous, but it is also extremely wasteful, with more than 99% loss.220V ac means the LED sees +/-311V peak and with a resistance of 47k, you will get a dim 6.6mA in the LED (less than 20 mW), with a total loss of 2W peak.Even if it only happens at every other half wave, it still comes a bit to close to the 1W rating of the resistor, which further is almost hermetically sealed into the mains plug - a fire trap lurking..Another issue is that LEDs are usually rated for max. 5V reverse voltage and you hit it with 311V. I wonder how long it's gonna stay alive..On the assembly, you screw into a single wire on one side and into the "flat side" of the bend over resistor lead, which you further mishandle by turning it 180°.When using screw te...

    see more »

    Hi,.You _did_ write that this circuit is dangerous, but it is also extremely wasteful, with more than 99% loss.220V ac means the LED sees +/-311V peak and with a resistance of 47k, you will get a dim 6.6mA in the LED (less than 20 mW), with a total loss of 2W peak.Even if it only happens at every other half wave, it still comes a bit to close to the 1W rating of the resistor, which further is almost hermetically sealed into the mains plug - a fire trap lurking..Another issue is that LEDs are usually rated for max. 5V reverse voltage and you hit it with 311V. I wonder how long it's gonna stay alive..On the assembly, you screw into a single wire on one side and into the "flat side" of the bend over resistor lead, which you further mishandle by turning it 180°.When using screw terminals of any kind where a screw alone is brought into contact with a lead/wire, springiness of the wire is what makes it hold (that's also why you should never cover a multi-strand wire in solder, if it goes into a simple screw terminal).Twist the wire and fold it double with multi-strand wire and make sure the screw touches the short folded piece. With single strand and component leads, twist the "loose" end around the pin in a helical pattern. This will assure the needed springiness. Never ever twist a component lead the way you did, it will weaken the spot where the lead meets the "housing" extremely much (or break it off completely)..If you have a need for a night light or such, using a capacitive dropper will be almost loss free and won't heat up, but do beware, a lot of capacitive droppers shown on the net (and on this site) are made wrong and some are even pretty dangerous..Have a nice day :)

    View Instructable »
  • Omnivent commented on mikeasaurus's instructable Rotating TV4 months ago
    Rotating TV

    A car window wiper motor from your local car dump? Most (all?) comes with a (self locking) worm drive.Those for the rear window is usually smaller, so less strong and less power hungry.Regards

    View Instructable »
  • Omnivent commented on tomatoskins's instructable Lathe Tool Holders5 months ago
    Lathe Tool Holders

    Exactly what I thought when I saw it: "An accident waiting to happen", whether it's personal injury or tools smashed - wonder who takes the most damage if a heavy tool hit an edge. A hand automatically trying to recover a slippery grip when fetching tool, might mean extra power to the hand trying to challenge an edge.A 2" or so board or ply, a bit over the top of the lathe tools would probably negate the need for bandages :)But that said, it certainly looks neat!

    View Instructable »
  • Omnivent commented on Nawielectron's instructable Mould Chocolate Like a Pro!6 months ago
    Mould Chocolate Like a Pro!

    Hi,."Then melt it (it does not matter how),"If you want to go even a bit pro chocolatier on this, tempering the chocolate is mandatory and also the only way to get a glossy outside that doesn't melt onto your fingers as soon as you grab one :)https://www.ecolechocolat.com/en/chocolate-tempering.htmlOnly fast skimmed a couple of lines, but that page seems to be explaining it well..BTW, pros use rigid molds (and scrapers), to get the job done, silicone is not very trustworthy for chocolate...Have a nice day :)

    Approximately 2 years back. Click to study the smoothness (They tasted as good as they looked :)

    View Instructable »
  • Keyrings Made From Ice Cube Trays and Pony Beads

    Hi,"There's no hard and fast rule for the amount of beads you need."Well, a rule of thumb would be:Just the right amount ;)How to find it: 1) Pour water in your mold until it reaches the level you want2) Transfer the water to a measuring glass - now you know the volume needed3) Fill the measuring glas with water to a known mark4) Dump beads into the glass, until it reaches your previous measure PLUS the amount you found that your mold takes (you might need to hold the beads down, if they're lighter than the water)Alternatively, if the beads are very regular sized. Measure the volume of say 10 beads and divide the total by ten (or whatever amount you measured), to find the volume of a single one., then you just need to perform steps 1 and 2 for each new mold.Have a nice day :)

    View Instructable »
  • Omnivent commented on Techno_Bot01's instructable Arduino Hearing Test6 months ago
    Arduino Hearing Test

    Hi,Unfortunately, this buzzer will not reveal your hearing limit, as it has got a very limited frequency span and isn't even linear in the range that it covers.If only... Truckloads of cash could be saved on audiology equipment ;).One way to get a whole lot more linear, would be to add a precise measuring microphone covering the typical audible spectrum (typically set to 20Hz to 20kHz) and, in the program adjust the output amplitude to a certain SPL. Your buzzer will likely not go lower than say 100Hz and not higher than 8kHz (and that is probably being very optimistic :).Still , the buzzer will have resonances and harmonics that are hard to correct (sine waves and a full tone speaker would be better), even with this method and further, you don't have a magic brick wall limit. For most...

    see more »

    Hi,Unfortunately, this buzzer will not reveal your hearing limit, as it has got a very limited frequency span and isn't even linear in the range that it covers.If only... Truckloads of cash could be saved on audiology equipment ;).One way to get a whole lot more linear, would be to add a precise measuring microphone covering the typical audible spectrum (typically set to 20Hz to 20kHz) and, in the program adjust the output amplitude to a certain SPL. Your buzzer will likely not go lower than say 100Hz and not higher than 8kHz (and that is probably being very optimistic :).Still , the buzzer will have resonances and harmonics that are hard to correct (sine waves and a full tone speaker would be better), even with this method and further, you don't have a magic brick wall limit. For most, the interesting thing is how much loss at which frequencies - multiple frequencies at multiple amplitudes are used to characterize a persons hearing..Have a nice day :)

    View Instructable »
  • Omnivent commented on tattoogirl's instructable Flower Garden Spinner6 months ago
    Flower Garden Spinner

    Nice!Why not enter it into the Make it Move contest as well? :).Adding a couple of small magnets and a coil, you could drive an LED to light it up in the dark if you'd like :).I'm going to make two small Savonius rotors myself, for driving torches (faux flames) each side of a balcony - got no garden to play in..Have a nice day :)

    View Instructable »
  • Omnivent commented on one0916's instructable Automatic Night Light 6 months ago
    Automatic  Night Light

    Hi again,You do not need delay for such circuits, just hysteresis, which, in case you don't know, is a difference in upper and lower threshold - in this case made with feedback.In plain terms, when the voltage is rising and reaches the upper threshold, the feedback adds a little, to get it into a more stable region faster and v.v for the negative going voltage.."your circuit needs a resistor at second base."No it doesn't!Thinking about why you think that and what purpose you think that it would have, will likely teach you more than if I just told you, so I won'tJust consider what its purpose would be..Turning it upside down, I can guarantee you that you have a base resistor on the second transistor that is doing nothing but eventually quenching the circuit a bit ;).Have fun a...

    see more »

    Hi again,You do not need delay for such circuits, just hysteresis, which, in case you don't know, is a difference in upper and lower threshold - in this case made with feedback.In plain terms, when the voltage is rising and reaches the upper threshold, the feedback adds a little, to get it into a more stable region faster and v.v for the negative going voltage.."your circuit needs a resistor at second base."No it doesn't!Thinking about why you think that and what purpose you think that it would have, will likely teach you more than if I just told you, so I won'tJust consider what its purpose would be..Turning it upside down, I can guarantee you that you have a base resistor on the second transistor that is doing nothing but eventually quenching the circuit a bit ;).Have fun and learn :)

    View Instructable »
  • Omnivent commented on one0916's instructable Automatic Night Light 7 months ago
    Automatic  Night Light

    Hi there,An LDR is not slower than a solar panel, the limiting factor for both is the slow changing ambient light. An LDR can easily detect several kHz.Your numbered list of "Pro's" does not have much bearing with actual facts either."1. No Relay chattering problem."The relay chattering issue could (should) be solved by adding a bit of hysteresis, by providing a bit of feedback. It is evident, that you have similar problems with the solar panel, since you had to add an RC buffer/filter. It is a design problem, pure and simple."2. IC s are not required"Neither are they for an LDR ;)"3.Less component count."Simply not true, see attached schematic."4.Either solar panel or power supply value is specific,you can go with any value of your choice.&...

    see more »

    Hi there,An LDR is not slower than a solar panel, the limiting factor for both is the slow changing ambient light. An LDR can easily detect several kHz.Your numbered list of "Pro's" does not have much bearing with actual facts either."1. No Relay chattering problem."The relay chattering issue could (should) be solved by adding a bit of hysteresis, by providing a bit of feedback. It is evident, that you have similar problems with the solar panel, since you had to add an RC buffer/filter. It is a design problem, pure and simple."2. IC s are not required"Neither are they for an LDR ;)"3.Less component count."Simply not true, see attached schematic."4.Either solar panel or power supply value is specific,you can go with any value of your choice."I am guessing here, but did you mean "Neither solar panel, nor power supply value is specific"?That would be a stretch - better add a "Within reason" in front of that :)"4.Good isolation between AC and DC."The AC-DC isolation is catered for solely by the relay, not what components you use to drive the relay with.The attached schematic cures your relay chatter problem, whether you use an LDR or a solar panel.R1 (not needed with a solar panel of course) has to be selected from the LDR at hand and the value can be found by measuring the LDR at the amount of ambient light that you want the shift to occur at. Knowing that value, select R1 for an output from the R1/LDR node of around 0.9V. The actual value depends on the amount of feedback used, so could be made up of a resistor and a trimmer, to enable adjustment.R_FB is what determines the amount of feedback and its value depends on what hysteris you need and to some extent, the values of R1 and the LDR.Finally, an 1N4148 is a better choise for the relay, as it is much faster than the 1N400x family (A fast version of the 1N4007 is the UF4007, but 1N4148 is ample for most small relays with less than 100..150mA actuation current). In rare cases, an 1N4148 over the output transistor may cure any issues and an "upgrade" to BC337 will tolerate more current if needs be).Have a nice day :)

    View Instructable »
  • Automatic Water Level Controller Using Transistors or 555 Timer IC

    Hi,Your ground reference should be named 0V or ground, it can't be 12V, as this is your reference for all other voltage measurements.I spent some time tidying up your schematic so that others are able to follow it and have attached it here.Have a nice day :)

    View Instructable »
  • Automatic Water Level Controller Using Transistors or 555 Timer IC

    Hi,You build the 3 transistor version as the pictures show. If it works, could you please correct the schematic for it, as it is flawed in several ways and will never be able to work as is.The terminal named "-VC" should be 0V, not 12V and please check which nodes go to which terminal of the water tank and correct the transistor connections as well.The 555 circuit seems OK.Have a nice day :)Regards

    View Instructable »
  • Omnivent commented on focamonca's instructable Refusbish Your SOLDERING IRON TIP10 months ago
    Refusbish Your SOLDERING IRON TIP

    Hi,A soldering sponge should be used _moist_, _not_wet_, and it's a myth that a soldering tip will get thermal shock from this - now the lazy Joes, that don't wanna re-moist every now and then, does use it wet and then it's a totally different ballgame of course.The "scouring pads" on the other hand _will_ shorten the life of a tip. The iron coating is a few µ-meter (they're electroplated), so using them is IMO as destructive as the "scour a PCB with steel wool" advice, you stumble upon every now and then.Perhaps an instructable on caring for your soldering iron should go into my project log :)It could deal with some of the other bad soldering advice I see regularly here and elsewhere as well.Regards

    View Instructable »
  • Brake Failure Indicator Using 555 Timer | DIY | Step by Step | How to

    Hi,What netzener said, plus you need to swap Q1 emitter and collector for the circuit to be able to give any warning at all. As is, it can only extinguish the green LED.While of absolutely no use in a car, it might have other applications to detect breaks in conducting stuff - _if_ you correct the schematic as devised.As an aside note, never feed current through important parts of a car, whether wire or chassis. if at all avoidable, as it will increase rust and material migration!Regards

    View Instructable »
  • Omnivent commented on Mary kristineF's instructable How to Sign PDF for Free10 months ago
    How to Sign PDF for Free

    Hi,"Go to their official website to download the application. You can also use this app online without downloading it."Please post links when you refer to such.I'm guessing that it would be: https://lightpdf.com/ (?)However, as far as I can see, LightPDF is an _online_ tool ONLY!!!If you have a link to a download, please share, as I can see uses for it beyond signatures (which I'd never dare put in a digital document - no point helping identity thieves :)Regards.

    View Instructable »
  • Omnivent commented on VKBakes's instructable Felt Flowers10 months ago
  • Omnivent's instructable +/- 0..15V Power Supply - Part 1's weekly stats: 1 year ago
    • +/- 0..15V Power Supply - Part 1
      949 views
      30 favorites
      1 comments
  • Omnivent commented on Matti97's instructable $1 lamp project2 years ago
  • Omnivent commented on Sramir27's instructable Nikon Speed Light2 years ago
  • Omnivent commented on Sramir27's instructable Nikon Speed Light2 years ago
  • Omnivent commented on amandaghassaei's instructable 555 Timer2 years ago
  • Omnivent's instructable Kelvin Mixer's weekly stats: 2 years ago
    • Kelvin Mixer
      2,530 views
      44 favorites
      4 comments
  • Omnivent commented on Omnivent's instructable Kelvin Mixer2 years ago
  • Omnivent commented on Omnivent's instructable Kelvin Mixer2 years ago
  • More Activities