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  • It is DAWN, and get only the blue color liquid. It has properties that no other dish soap has. I don't know what's in it, but it is called for specifically in a few crafts I do. I don't recommend actually using it to wash your dishes unless you wear gloves. It does a great job of cutting grease, but will strip the natural oils from your skin too and cause them to crack and bleed if you immerse your bare hands in it, on a regular basis. I'm not the only person who has had that happen. I've actually seen a random person with cracked bleeding hands and asked them if they used blue Dawn to wash dishes, and they said, "Yes!" The product has been used for decades to clean up animals in oil spill distasters, so it does have great uses. The manufacturer claims it is "gentle and saf…

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    It is DAWN, and get only the blue color liquid. It has properties that no other dish soap has. I don't know what's in it, but it is called for specifically in a few crafts I do. I don't recommend actually using it to wash your dishes unless you wear gloves. It does a great job of cutting grease, but will strip the natural oils from your skin too and cause them to crack and bleed if you immerse your bare hands in it, on a regular basis. I'm not the only person who has had that happen. I've actually seen a random person with cracked bleeding hands and asked them if they used blue Dawn to wash dishes, and they said, "Yes!" The product has been used for decades to clean up animals in oil spill distasters, so it does have great uses. The manufacturer claims it is "gentle and safe".

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  • PattyP17 commented on gmoon's instructable CDornaments

    He said toxic layer not toxic laser! LOL...

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  • SWhen catsting resin for jewelry pieces, one must suusally coat the item to be incuded betyween two layers of resin with clear modge podge, white craft glue, or other non-reactive clear coat. Once dry, it protects the tiem from reacting with the resin. Even some inks on paper will react, so most anythying gest clear coated to prevent bubbling, dissolving, tec.

    @tiger66466 - what brand of blank CDs did you use? My blanks are not that holographic/lacking pretty colors. I've heard brands vary.

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  • A home oven does not heat to a high enough temp to anneal metals. I am a trained silversmith.

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  • Thanks for the instructable! I read it thinking, "Oh, I've spent so much on crafts, I don't think I want to spend money on a tumbler that I won't use much after making sea glass". Then I remembered my husband does have a cement mixer he bought used for about the same price as a new tabletop tumbler! He uses it for mixing large batches of chicken feed from a list of organic components, every few weeks for our laying hens. He had to chip a few layers of old concrete residue from the inside and clean well before using. I'd just have to make sure to thoroughly clean and dry it aftyer use. Cool!Uh, don't worry, I'll ask him before sullying his precious tool, LOL.I'm wondering where one can get thicker prices of glass, and if any stained glass would make a good source of uniquie color…

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    Thanks for the instructable! I read it thinking, "Oh, I've spent so much on crafts, I don't think I want to spend money on a tumbler that I won't use much after making sea glass". Then I remembered my husband does have a cement mixer he bought used for about the same price as a new tabletop tumbler! He uses it for mixing large batches of chicken feed from a list of organic components, every few weeks for our laying hens. He had to chip a few layers of old concrete residue from the inside and clean well before using. I'd just have to make sure to thoroughly clean and dry it aftyer use. Cool!Uh, don't worry, I'll ask him before sullying his precious tool, LOL.I'm wondering where one can get thicker prices of glass, and if any stained glass would make a good source of uniquie colored pieces. I'm thinking I might use thick non-colored (therefore, non-safety or non- borosilicate that has a somewhat of a green tinge) clear glass and color it after tumbling with alcohol inks or glass paint (Pebeo Vitria) that you set in a home oven. Hmmm... so many possibilities. Thanks for firing up my imaginaion!

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  • PattyP17 commented on Atomic Shrimp's instructable Drink Can Tinwork

    Very cool! Thanks for sharing.

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  • Duncan, most brilliant glue gun reply evah!

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  • I am all about food safety, but for salt and pepper tops that screw on, I would be far less concerned than I would be for plates, mugs and storage containers . If one is painting only the ouside of the tops, you could first remove the rust and oxidation with a wire brush or sandpaper, then use very find emery paper (with the black water-resistant grit) to smooth out the deeper scratches, progressing from say 200 grit to 400, then 600. I've gone as high as an 800 grit on sterling sliver to get as shiny a finish as possible before buffing. Then thoroughly clean with 91% rubbing alcohol, dry and spray paint with a white primer. You just want enough to coat. Allow to dry and cure according to can directions, then spray with gold or silver spray paint, or whatever clor matches you project. Al…

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    I am all about food safety, but for salt and pepper tops that screw on, I would be far less concerned than I would be for plates, mugs and storage containers . If one is painting only the ouside of the tops, you could first remove the rust and oxidation with a wire brush or sandpaper, then use very find emery paper (with the black water-resistant grit) to smooth out the deeper scratches, progressing from say 200 grit to 400, then 600. I've gone as high as an 800 grit on sterling sliver to get as shiny a finish as possible before buffing. Then thoroughly clean with 91% rubbing alcohol, dry and spray paint with a white primer. You just want enough to coat. Allow to dry and cure according to can directions, then spray with gold or silver spray paint, or whatever clor matches you project. Allow to cure, then use a high gloss spray clear coat suitable for the spray paint. All the above finishes are mildly toxic if food makes sufficient contact, but salt and pepper is only in contact with the holes for only a second or two. It's not like you have something liquid, or acid like tomato sauce, or even heated, coming into contact with the finish for enough time for it to dissolve at all. I just realized as well, for the final gloss finish you can use a water-based clear coat that brushes on, like a water-based polyurethane that is non-toxic, or maybe less toxic, but not officially food safe. I don't know if it can be gotten in a spray, as most spray products for painting or finishing are petroleum based. I did use a water based brush on for clear coating a painted gold picture frame to keep the gold from darkening, because I have experienced pertoleum-based clear coats interacting with pertroleum-based paint coats and changing their look, color, and dulling them. Anyway, though i asm extraordiarily careful about keeping things food safe, I would srapy apint the tops myself. I do npot necessarily sugeest anyone else do it - my disclaimer.

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  • Borax may be called "washing powder", a laundry additive. Oldest brand in the USA is Borateem. Boric acid is available in drugstores (chemist in the UK?). It has a great nuber of uses, including mixing weak solutions as an eye wash. It is alsp available on Amazon. Here are the search results for boric acid on Amazon's UK site:https://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1/258-05...Hope that helps!

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  • Walmart sell two or three sizes of very small ziploc bags in the craft section.

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  • PattyP17 commented on knopfling's instructable How to Sew Shoelaces

    Very cool! I love it. I always have soem scraps left from pretty fabric that I want to make yet more stuff with, but there isn't enough left for anything large. This is a great option!

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  • Good one!

    Personally, I think it all depends on the situation. I only used it to fill the teeniest of holes, like from a push pin. Too bad we didn't have Command strips back in the day. The little push pin repairs stay in, even when painted after fully dry, 'cuz I've done that in my own house. Anything bigger, I use joint compound, spackle, or other "regular" patching supplies. It may matter which toothpaste you use too. Too wet and it would flop out before dry, too dry and it won't adhere to the sheetrock/plaster. I used white Colgate because it was free at the dentist with each visit and was not my regular brand.

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  • Great instructable. LOL at "disemvowelled"!Oh, and when removing silver tarnish in a hot bath with an immersed sheet of aluminum foil, cream of tartar works better than baking soda and salt.

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  • Made into a very thick paste with water (just barely wet enough to conform to your skin and put on insect stings (wasps, bees, etc.). It will draw out poison/irritants/venom. Be sure if a bee sting that the stinger is removed first by scraping arm with a credit card to pull it out. It will dry and crack and want to fall off, but instead you can add a few drops of water as it dries out. Too much water and it will become liquid and roll off your skin. Not recommended for snake bites, just insects.

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  • I Scotchguarded a pair of wooden wedge shoes that I put new fabric tops on many years ago, and to my dismay the Scotchguard turned the fabric very yellow after a few months. But that was decades ago and the formulation has likely changed. You might consider contacting customer servcie for the manufacturer via email and ask.

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  • Brooklyntonia, different paints can vary a great deal in performance. Flat paint is the least durable and can even be scrubbed off the wall when trying to remove stains or dirt, so it is only recommended for dry areas of little wear, especially ceilings. People do use it though to hide bad or messy repairs in drywall, since those can be harder to see on a flat rather than glossy wall. It is a good base for wall paper because it is absorbent - that is if you want the wallpaper there permanently. The glossier the paint, in general, the more durable the paint itself will be, but the less absorbency, which in most cases, is a good thing. If you read instructions for hanging wallpaper, it is always recommends to de-gloss shiny paint before proceeding, whether by sanding or using the appropriat…

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    Brooklyntonia, different paints can vary a great deal in performance. Flat paint is the least durable and can even be scrubbed off the wall when trying to remove stains or dirt, so it is only recommended for dry areas of little wear, especially ceilings. People do use it though to hide bad or messy repairs in drywall, since those can be harder to see on a flat rather than glossy wall. It is a good base for wall paper because it is absorbent - that is if you want the wallpaper there permanently. The glossier the paint, in general, the more durable the paint itself will be, but the less absorbency, which in most cases, is a good thing. If you read instructions for hanging wallpaper, it is always recommends to de-gloss shiny paint before proceeding, whether by sanding or using the appropriate primer. Typical wallpaper, whether pre-pasted or vinyl, sticks less well to paint the shinier the paint it is. The shininess is a slick barrier to penetration. The difference between flat and high gloss could be compared to newsprint vs. plastic, but that's a bit extreme I admit. Looked under a microscope, flat would look looser, hilly and bumpy, possibly a bit fuzzy, and gloss would have most the molecules aligned flat against each other, proving no "tooth", meaning no rough surface on a microscopic level for things to latch onto.The other important factor with paint is the quality. Quality, which usually is reflected on the price you have to pay, makes a huge difference in how well any paint will cover with the minimum number of coats and truly hide what was underneath and how long the pigment will actually last. Whaaaat? Yes, cheap paints can have the surface "chalk" away. Cheap paint literally can turn quietly to dust and leave the wall over time. Also, never use indoor paint outside. It will chalk terribly.My house before this one has a very cheap paint job inside in several areas. In bright light, you could see every path of the roller, especially where they put dark forest green on a white wall.The fact that you plan to remove the fabric in a few years or so means that your shiny paint will make it quite easy, so no problem. The shiny paint is probably durable enough (and your paint work looks great), that your could gently wash down the walls after fabric removal and not have to paint again for some time.I have remodeled and upgraded three homes, my hub and I doing most the work ourselves, over the last 26 years. Before that, I was a renter with frustrated aspirations to DIY already!

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  • If the paneling is way old, the face layer is wood veneer, which can be painted and this project would work well. The veneer would need cleaning to remove dust and oil. If it looks like Formica or shiny paper or some sort of plastic coating, you'd have to try a test spot, like behind a large piece of furniture and use a spray primer lightly, adding several coats until pure white. That would help form a barrier to keep the laminated paneling from separating.After primer is dry, you could paint, allow to dry, then apply starch and fabric. One thing that needs to be stressed is that each layer of primer and paint must have time to cure per manufacturer's directions before moving on to next step.

    I love this 'able! I have fabric I love that just doesn't quite lend itself to apparel and it would work well for this. My color tastes are quite different than yours, but if we all loved the same thing, there would be a terrible shortage of it, right?I think one of the keys to being able to remove it later is the pre-paint, but especially with a semi-gloss, perhaps satin, paint. With flat or eggshell, the starch may penetrate deeply enough into the paint to cause damage at removal. I did notice it appears you used a semi-gloss.

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  • Beautiful! Perhaps you should re-name the instructable "Revamped Cast Iron Fountain", because it is already a garden fountain or a public drinking fountain (not a "sink"), usually mounted on a brick or stone wall. Some European cities still use theses as public drinking fountains. Here's a Google link to a number of types of cast iron fountains, whether in a garden or in public for drinking:https://www.google.com/search?q=rome+public+drinking+fountain&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi0heeElqjUAhVKPiYKHZd6A9IQ_AUICigB&biw=1600&bih=894#tbm=isch&q=cast+iron+drinking+fountain

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  • That means that this instructable is timeless and still is relevant. New people are discovering this data all over again and again. New comments probably bring it back to the top of the heap of popular subjects. You don't want to know anything anyone shared with anyone else on how to do something that's over a few weeks old?If you want extremely new posts only, take a moment to read the date posted in the upper left under "About This Instructable".

    Also, you can click on "explore" at the top of the page and then click on "recent". That will give you only the newest stuff. I'd rather read the "popular" ones most of the time.

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  • I don't know about vinegar or alhohol, but bleach (sodium hypochlorite) plus AMMONIA = nerve gas.

    Clean and disinfect the cooler first, then close it up with a small rage soaked in REAL vanilla extract (there are fakes these days) for a few days to a week. I don't know why it works, but it will actually remove the odor. Yes, you will smell vanilla at first, but after the rag is removed, in a few days, all the odors are gone.

    Bleach is a necessary chemical in most people's lives. It's what is used in the water supply of most towns and cities to keep all of us from getting Cholera, Typhoid and any other number of waterborne diseases. Just because it CAN be very dangerous doesn't mean no one should use it, like knives, or fire. Any dangerous chemical or device should be handled with care.

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  • Great solution to a problem that most people would have figured they had to spend a lot more on.

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  • Ha! that made me laughy. When I was a jeweler in training, I learned to rub opals and other soft stones like jade on my nose before returning to the customer to make them shine after gentle cleaning. The first time I saw a co-worker do that, I freaked.

    I would advise switching to silicone grease. O-rings are also a petroleum product and there could be a possible failure of certain o-rings exposed to vaseline, depending on composition. I worked in the water treatment industry.

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  • Brown sugar is white sugar with molasses added back that was removed when refining the sugar.

    I've used apple cider vinegar in traps like this for gnats, so it may work for whatever fly a midge is.

    I've successfully used apple cider vinegar in a trap like this for fruit flies and gnats. Fruit flies like bananas a lot too. And old saying:Time flies like the wind. Fruit flies like bananas.

    Yes, probably. I use honey with yeast instead of sugar to make bread, so I think so.

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  • Sounds great! Gonna try it. Thanks!

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  • PattyP17 commented on Jakes workshop's instructable Make a Human Table

    Of course. Trying to balance at all is a risky proposition. Using people of different hreights or weights complicates the matter. also, both people have to sit or stand at the same time, and the table is going to fall over the moment they stand up, unless the stay bent and hold it. Argh! Death trap! ;-)

    ...and mixed with alcohol could provide quite a few laughs - and some injuries!

    Thanks for the grins. Totally useless, yet people will insist on building it. Add wide circular "legs" the length of the thing (on the outside) and make a death trap see-saw! I think you ought to get people to comment to add insane additives, like a giant air bubble level on/in the table top so the people seated can work to keep it level. That combined with the see-saw thing would be even funnier. 3/4 length anti-tip leg pegs on the four corners would make it safer and easier to get into, but then you probably thought of that.

    Ditto!

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  • Many oven models, for over 40 years, have had a cleaning cycle. Basically, you engage locks so no one can open and pick the length of cycle for how dirty the oven is, two, four, or six hours. The idea is that the oven comes on at 500 degrees or more and the burnt-on stuff is supposed to be burned to ash. It uses a lot of electricity, and in my experience only ends up damaging the metal insides over time. Overall, putting a mat in the bottom and cleaning like you illustrate are the best ways overall.

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  • Ah! Very finely grated hard white cheese like Parmesan would truly add to the realism. If they opened to smell, one whiff would tell them the sandwich had definitely "died". Great idea!

    Maybe add a printed small tag that says "penicillin experiment"!

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  • No need to apologize. I think you are right. If I remember, rightly or wrongly, that PS and/or Corel software were the #1 software programs used way back in the day by pros when graphics software (other than default MS Paint) was 1st written. I saw a couple people with what I was pretty sure copies that were pirated straight from the disks, but PS seemed to win out eventually over Corel in user numbers. Yep, I can understand how the popularity led to demand for it in business. And what's a business to do when a desired employee is only proficient in that one program?Yeah, I stopped using Word a few years after paying for Office the first time. Later when I found out I had to buy yet another new FULL version, I started using Open Office. No regrets.

    Oops, age and memory lapses! I think Corel Draw did not have photo editing capability then. I did not have/use/learn photo editing until 2001 as I was a fine artist (watercolor, acrylic painting, ceramics, more). I turned to digital after an accident in which I was laid up for a extended period. I've bought two versions of PS over the last 15 years, and though newer versions would be nice to have, I'm fine with what I've got, especially now that I just entertain myself with it in my retirement.

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  • Cloning gradients like sea and sky does not work well at all. It's usually very obvious. Photoshop is the most graphic popular software and used by more businesses and hobbiests worldwide than any other program. Selecting many times does not work well for a particular individual as they must learn how to define and adjust the edges settings before selecting. If it's inaccurate, it can take trial after trial. There can be as many as five different ways to get the same desired result in PS. Cutting has always been the most common method taught, especially for novices. Anyone who is not a novice does not need this tutorial. A person new to PS can be taught to cut a clean edge in less time that other methods to isolate parts of an image. In his choices, the person who posted this tutorial pic…

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    Cloning gradients like sea and sky does not work well at all. It's usually very obvious. Photoshop is the most graphic popular software and used by more businesses and hobbiests worldwide than any other program. Selecting many times does not work well for a particular individual as they must learn how to define and adjust the edges settings before selecting. If it's inaccurate, it can take trial after trial. There can be as many as five different ways to get the same desired result in PS. Cutting has always been the most common method taught, especially for novices. Anyone who is not a novice does not need this tutorial. A person new to PS can be taught to cut a clean edge in less time that other methods to isolate parts of an image. In his choices, the person who posted this tutorial picked the most common denominator. I taught PS to beginners in an online group for over five years. That does not make me any sort of expert, just that I have experience teaching it to rankd beginners to intermediate ones. Opinions of what to do and how to do it are just that - a matter of opinion. There are no rules, only results. The "best way" is only that which works best for that individual and their skill set. :-D

    I know, right? LOL.

    Cloning gradients like sea and sky does not work well at all. It's usually very obvious. Photoshop is the most graphic popular software and used by more businesses and hobbiests worldwide than any other program. Selecting many times does not work well for a particular individual as they must learn how to define and adjust the edges settings before selecting. If it's inaccurate, it can take trial after trail. There can be as many as five different was to get the same desired result in PS. Cutting has always been the most common method taught, especially for novices. Anyone who is not a novice does not need this tutorial. A person new to PS can be taught to cut a clean edge in less time that other methods to isolate parts of an image. In his choices, the person who posted this tutorial pick…

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    Cloning gradients like sea and sky does not work well at all. It's usually very obvious. Photoshop is the most graphic popular software and used by more businesses and hobbiests worldwide than any other program. Selecting many times does not work well for a particular individual as they must learn how to define and adjust the edges settings before selecting. If it's inaccurate, it can take trial after trail. There can be as many as five different was to get the same desired result in PS. Cutting has always been the most common method taught, especially for novices. Anyone who is not a novice does not need this tutorial. A person new to PS can be taught to cut a clean edge in less time that other methods to isolate parts of an image. In his choices, the person who posted this tutorial picked the most common denominator. I taught PS to beginners in an online group for over five years. Opinions of what to do and how to do it are just that - a matter of opinion and what one is used to or likes best. There are no rules, only results. The "best way" is only what works best for that individual and their skill set. :-D

    I'd heard that PhotoShop was the most pirated software in the world, so they decided to rent it for better security I suppose. Sorry, no experience with GIMP. There are plenty of free tutorials for any graphic software online. Google search.

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  • Brilliant idea! I think that a model needs to be developed that does not raise the heel so much. Unsteady seniors that can walk away from home are too likely to fall even in their own home wearing a shoes with raised heel. I am one of them. I can only wear flats, nothing higher than your normal athletic shoe. I love the fact that one can position their feet to alert others without a potential attacker realizing it.

    Seniors with dementia routinely cast off jackets hats and other items when they wander. They seldom remove their shoes.

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  • Not ridiculous! This method has been used by apartment dwellers without a stove for decades.

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  • I understand that incandescent lights get too hot. Why not 110V LED light sets? No battery pack to futz with and no batteries to change. Tes, the hole would have to be bigger. You can get some fairly short sets or plug-in LEDs at Christmas time. I know they are probably larger and brighter than the "rice grain" sized battery fairy lights. I would plan to cut a larger hole on the bottle bottom and coat the inside of the bottle with with glass paint or some other semi-clear paint or alcohol ink to obscure the lights a bit better. One could even coat the lower 3/4 of the bottle with amber alcohol ink, and make the bottle look like it still had liquor in it! Hmm...

    BTW, I meant to say great project and hop you win. This is one of the few I would actually make and that got me thinking...

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  • Gorgeous! I think I would not make this from paper though. Too easy to destroy by accident and hours of work then lost. If I did make it, I would either use sheet metal like copper or nickel silver and use silver solder to attach all pieces. Heavy wire of the same metal to make the parts you did in heavy string. Foam construction might be another option if one does not have good soldering skills.Good luck in the contest!

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  • PattyP17 commented on He Se 's instructable Pesto Bread

    I think I'll try this as a sweet bread with a prune filling, or maybe like a cinnamon roll. I can't eat most green spices, but it looks very yummy!

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  • Sounds interesting. What kind of cheese do you like for this? Also, you may wabnt to edit the title. You wrote "CHESSY" instead of "CHEESY". Good luck.

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  • To the best of my knowledge, all nightshade leaves are poisonous.

    Very cool. I wish I could ID even more plants than I can. There are so many plants that look alike. I know that eating wild is a lost art used ages ago by everyday medieval peasants to survive. There are over 200 edible wild plants in Europe, but few know them today. Unfortunately, some are mimics are deadly. Acorns are edible, but taste awful unless prepared just right. the only mushroom I trust to ID is a Morel because it doesn't look like any other.

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  • This instructable was very helpful for those of us who want fluffy pancakes that are not soggy in the middle. Buckwheat and other whole grains, though they may be healthier are much heavier flours and don't lend themselves easily to "light" baked goods or griddle cakes. I don't always use syrup or jelly so adding sweetness to the batter is essential, but I add pure liquid Splenda, which is altered sugar. Butter burns at the high temp some of us like to cook our pancakes at so I use coconut oil, but I also have spray olive oil and other natural oil sprays for various temperatures. On top of all that, this is not something the readers will eat every day. It's a once or twice per month at most for our household. I found your remarks rude and judgmental to Matt who took the time to …

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    This instructable was very helpful for those of us who want fluffy pancakes that are not soggy in the middle. Buckwheat and other whole grains, though they may be healthier are much heavier flours and don't lend themselves easily to "light" baked goods or griddle cakes. I don't always use syrup or jelly so adding sweetness to the batter is essential, but I add pure liquid Splenda, which is altered sugar. Butter burns at the high temp some of us like to cook our pancakes at so I use coconut oil, but I also have spray olive oil and other natural oil sprays for various temperatures. On top of all that, this is not something the readers will eat every day. It's a once or twice per month at most for our household. I found your remarks rude and judgmental to Matt who took the time to be helpful, and also to those reading here. If you want people to make pancakes more healthy than posted above, please just suggest what you would substitute (as I did) without trying to make anyone wrong, or go write your own instructable. Or if you don't agree with a person's instructable, please just walk away rather than make anyone wrong.

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  • PattyP17 commented on Luca Gerda's instructable Eerie glowing jars!

    erasers on the end of pencils make great dots too.

    That just inspired me. An empty plastic soda bottle or grated cheese container is lightweight and would turn easily if mounted well.

    @Egyptsy - where do you get your glow in the dark powders? Do they glow really well?

    yes, they could be used in the garden at night. Bring them in before it rains because the paint might dissolve. The sun or a strong light inside will "charge it up" if you leave it in the light long enough. Most of my solar cahrged lights say like 8 hours of light for charging if I remember correctly.

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  • Got it. I need to clean mine too and hate to have to. Please use upper & lower case when typing. Upper case = yelling loudly. People hear a person yelling at them in their head when they read upper case. Seriously. I know it takes moire effort. I used to do it too until my secretary made me stop!

    Spray with an ammonia product and let sit. Maybe add some Dawn blue dishwashing liquid. Use a green nylon scrubbie and most or all of it comes off. Rinse and repeat if necessary. Additionally, most oven doors lift right off and may be cleaned more easily if laid over the dining table or a work bench. Get help lifting it unless you are very strong. They can be quite heavy.

    There are a few types of ovens now that silicone mats will ruin. I fdid a lot of research and read a lot of Amazon reviews ... but my brain leaks and I don't remember it all. I do remember that normal ovens with the usual electric elements are usually okay for silicone mats, as loong as the oven ois not but above a certain temp (450?).

    Thanks! I'm going to do that!

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  • LOL! Yeah. But I once had a cat that I had to teach to NOT get in the shower with me. He loved water. The time he jumped in and got dandruff shampoo all over his feet was the final straw. I grapsed him gently but firmly round the chest and held his feet under the spray to wash all his paws off and never a struggle. He seemed to enjoy it. One strange but very smart cat.

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  • Ah! Great idea. Now if my husband hasn't sold the camp stove, I'm in business.

    I definitely forgot about that use. I just don't don't know if I'm ready to scrape the ammonium nitrate off poo yet.

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