author

Pete Buxton

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2Instructables6,057Views20CommentsOregon, U.S.A.
Not quite an inventor, but I like to fix broken things and repurpose them. I love working with electronics, computers, ham radio

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  • Tim's Electronic Dividers [1D]

    It's very interesting how you explained the sine wave sensitivity of the Hall-effect device. I like reading about electronic parts (and mechanical too) that perform math functions.

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  • Infinity Macro Pad Using Pi Pico

    That has a nice form and lots of interesting controls. Nice combination of electronics and mechanics. Excuse my newbie question but can you give an example of what you connect it to (computer?) and what hardware or software you can control with it? I've seen other macro pads and people never say what they are used for. Thanks, and good job!

    Thank you. I checked out your cool drum pad and have been thinking to make one too.

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  • Guitar Wall Hanger With Leather and Pipe!

    Nice idea to swivel to match the headstock symmetry, and also the leather covering. I'll be making some for my guitars. Thanks!

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  • Indiana Jones - 3D Map of Excavation Site on Crete

    Thank you. You did a wonderful job on recreating it. And being 3-dimensional, yours looks even more real than the game!

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  • Indiana Jones - 3D Map of Excavation Site on Crete

    Although I don't know about games such as this, I love seeing miniature landscapes, buildings, and settings. This is great!

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  • If You Are a TIG Welder You NEED IT! Say Hello to "Third Hand"

    Great little invention! I also enjoyed all the smart and simple methods you used in the video while making the tool.

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  • Easy Joule Thief Circuit

    This is a clear and simple introduction to the magic of inductors.

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  • Solderless Electrical Connector

    Thanks for showing how you solved your problem.Your design looks practical and easy to make for the purpose you stated. Many people enjoy DIY rather than just buying a part, especially if they have the materials and tools and they live in a remote location. I'm glad that people share things that worked for them so others can use that information directly or modify it to suit their purpose and share too. Most DIY people understand what is safe to do using logic and experience. If someone is ignorant of known dangers and wants to learn the hard way, it's their choice.

    I'm with you. Your design could be used to temporarily connect and extend rods and/or wire sections that don't even carry electricity. Those safety inspectors who complained should lurk in the electrical section of Lowe's to warn people what they can and can't do with parts they are buying.

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  • DIY - Coil Winding Machine

    First of all, I am sorry to have hijacked Techgenie's project post and didn't intend to do that. I think he did a wonderful job on making his coil winding machine! The winder I made is from plans in a book listed below. I was lucky in 2003 to have bought Jason Lollar's book (ISBN 0-9662599) but it seems to be out of print now. Here is a current website about the book:https://www.lollarguitars.com/blog/tag/basic-pickup-winding-by-jason-lollar/The photo at the top of his website is from his plans in the book and is what I used to build mine. In his photo you can see how he used a motor and eccentric cam from an oscillating table fan to evenly move the wire guide back and forth while the main spindle pulls wire onto the bobbin, thus evenly distributing the winding. If you can find his book…

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    First of all, I am sorry to have hijacked Techgenie's project post and didn't intend to do that. I think he did a wonderful job on making his coil winding machine! The winder I made is from plans in a book listed below. I was lucky in 2003 to have bought Jason Lollar's book (ISBN 0-9662599) but it seems to be out of print now. Here is a current website about the book:https://www.lollarguitars.com/blog/tag/basic-pickup-winding-by-jason-lollar/The photo at the top of his website is from his plans in the book and is what I used to build mine. In his photo you can see how he used a motor and eccentric cam from an oscillating table fan to evenly move the wire guide back and forth while the main spindle pulls wire onto the bobbin, thus evenly distributing the winding. If you can find his book for sale, I highly recommend it.

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  • DIY - Coil Winding Machine

    Hi RCs Stuff,It was 15 years ago when I made the winder, then added a counter to it. I used a magnet on the spindle and a Hall effect switch. I am sure a reed switch would work too, but I don't know the upper speed limit of a reed switch. The main IC for the counting is a MC14553 three digit multiplexed BCD counter (I used two for 6 digits) feeding an MC14511 7-segment driver for each digit. I used MAN-6740 7-segment LED digits. I don't have the actual schematic that I used but I remember just following the data sheets for those two chips and the LED digits.

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  • Your project turned out great! I especially enjoyed reading your humorous story and noting all the clear instructions, photos, and tips.

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  • You're welcome, Techgenie. I really like your project and I voted for it.

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  • I like your idea for making the counter. Nice that you mentioned the speed limit for that method.

    I also like the simplicity of the cardboard. This project could be made quickly and is perfect for winding electromagnetic coils on spools. Great job!Fifteen years ago I made a coil winder from plans in a book by Jason Lollar (ISBN 0-9662599-2-0) specifically for winding guitar pickups. It took many tools and much time and effort to make. It uses a sewing machine motor-shaft-flywheel for winding, and an oscillating fan motor driving a cam to slowly and uniformly guide the wire to-and-fro. I needed the complexity to accurately wind #40+ wire on narrow, oblong magnetic poles. I later built and added an electronic counter circuit activated by a hall effect sensor on the rotary pully.

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    • A Compact Disc (CD) Mailer Box
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      4 comments
  • Thank you, Penolopy. Like I mentioned in the reply above, using strong tape is important. I will update my last step to mention this.

    Thank you for your comment. I agree with you that wrapping it around would be stronger, but in this Instructable I only mentioned, but didn't show, the final step, in which I use heavy duty shipping tape on all the joints. I mailed over 100 boxes like this and never received word of a problem—only praise, telling me it was fantastic. In all the hundreds of CDs I've bought by mail, only a small percentage were covered in cardboard on all sides like I did, so I felt this was an improvement over normal.

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