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  • Peter Balch commented on Peter Balch's instructable Transistor Curve Tracer5 hours ago
    Transistor Curve Tracer

    > perhaps the LM7322 is a good choice.Looks nice but is only SM and is quite expensive. I was trying to design something people could build with mostly what they had in their component drawer. Hence through-hole and stripboard. Alternatively, I imagined a Chinese company wanting to make one with SM and a better op-amp.One design I tried that worked quite well was not to use the DAC for the DUT collector load (i.e. only have a DAC for the base). The collector load resistor was connected to a 100u capacitor. A transistor connected to an Arduino digital pin shorted the cap to discharge it. Then the transistor was turned off and the cap slowly charged. As the cap charged, the Arduino ADCs measured Vcc of the DUT and the voltage across the load resistor. (You also need e.g. a 1k across of...

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    > perhaps the LM7322 is a good choice.Looks nice but is only SM and is quite expensive. I was trying to design something people could build with mostly what they had in their component drawer. Hence through-hole and stripboard. Alternatively, I imagined a Chinese company wanting to make one with SM and a better op-amp.One design I tried that worked quite well was not to use the DAC for the DUT collector load (i.e. only have a DAC for the base). The collector load resistor was connected to a 100u capacitor. A transistor connected to an Arduino digital pin shorted the cap to discharge it. Then the transistor was turned off and the cap slowly charged. As the cap charged, the Arduino ADCs measured Vcc of the DUT and the voltage across the load resistor. (You also need e.g. a 1k across of the C-E pins of the DUT so there is some charging current even when the DUT is "turned off").The advantage is that it's cheap and works well - it had less noise that the method I use now.The disadvantage is that you can't deal with JFETs in the rather sneaky way I do. Peter

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  • Peter Balch commented on Peter Balch's instructable Transistor Curve Tracer1 day ago
    Transistor Curve Tracer

    That could well be a better design than mine. I had real trouble with stability as you can tell.The best solution is, of course, to get rid of the dreadful LM358 and replace it with a decent rail-to-rail op-amp. I've done more searching and still haven't found a through-hole one.If you send the command 'Q' over the serial line then the Arduino produces a square wave at the DACs. You can look at the edges of the square wave with an oscilloscope and see how much it is degraded by the capacitors. In my code, there are big delays after any big change to the DACs to allow for the slow response of the "open collector op-amp".Peter

    Useful to know - thanks.I've been looking at the 1.1V internal Vref for the ADC (for another project). It has the advantage that it's a clean, stable signal. In the curve tracer I use the "5V" Vcc as Vref for the ADC which is variable and noisy. I compensate for the variable "5V" by measuring the voltage but it might be better to use the internal 1.1V.Some people run the Arduino off a "5V" or even "Raw" supply and use the 3V3 output as Vref for the ADC. If you're using an external 3.3V regulator for the display then the 3V3 pin should be pretty clean.

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  • Peter Balch commented on Peter Balch's instructable Transistor Curve Tracer3 days ago
    Transistor Curve Tracer

    A Nano will work just as well. A Nano is like a ProMini but with extra features.The ProMini has a 328p processor chip, a voltage reulator (to turn e.g. 9V into 5V) and that's it.The Nano is the same but with a second voltage reulator (to turn e.g. 9V into 3.3V) and an FTDI chip as a USB-to-serial converter.The "official" ProMini has two fewer ADC pins than the Nano but most of the ProMini clones on eBay give you the extra pins anyway (the positions of the extra pins varies between manufacturers).I chose the ProMini for its smaller size as I didn't need the built-in USB-to-serial converter for thr final "product". But the downside was that I then had to provide an external 3.3V regulator.If you use the Nano you can use its built-in 3.3V regulator to power the display ...

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    A Nano will work just as well. A Nano is like a ProMini but with extra features.The ProMini has a 328p processor chip, a voltage reulator (to turn e.g. 9V into 5V) and that's it.The Nano is the same but with a second voltage reulator (to turn e.g. 9V into 3.3V) and an FTDI chip as a USB-to-serial converter.The "official" ProMini has two fewer ADC pins than the Nano but most of the ProMini clones on eBay give you the extra pins anyway (the positions of the extra pins varies between manufacturers).I chose the ProMini for its smaller size as I didn't need the built-in USB-to-serial converter for thr final "product". But the downside was that I then had to provide an external 3.3V regulator.If you use the Nano you can use its built-in 3.3V regulator to power the display - I think it's powerful enough. But you'll have to work out your own stripboard layout.Please do let me know how you get on building one.Peter

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  • Peter Balch commented on Peter Balch's instructable Transistor Curve Tracer8 days ago
    Transistor Curve Tracer

    That's wonderful. It looks really good. Is it running at 3.7V ?Does the touch now work properly? I don't undertand why it didn't work before.

    > But I need one MT3608 step-up from 3.7V ( Lion/Lipo-Battery) to 5V-5.3V for Arduino Nano.My first thought was "why do you need 5V at all? Just run it all off unregulated 3.6V to 4.2V from the Lipo". You'd need to change the potential dividers that go into the ADCs. The MCP4802 will work at 2.7V to 5V; I'm using its 4V internal reference but you could tell it to use 2V then double the gains of the op-amps.I guess that's a lot of work and just using a boost SMPS is easier. Or have two Lipo cells.> Then one more MT3608 for the 12V-12,7V for the LM358 DriverAs you say, it's 12V-12,7V. And the "5V" supply might be a bit low. I designed the circuit assuming that the supply voltages would be exact but they never are. The 47k/33k potential dividers that go into the A...

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    > But I need one MT3608 step-up from 3.7V ( Lion/Lipo-Battery) to 5V-5.3V for Arduino Nano.My first thought was "why do you need 5V at all? Just run it all off unregulated 3.6V to 4.2V from the Lipo". You'd need to change the potential dividers that go into the ADCs. The MCP4802 will work at 2.7V to 5V; I'm using its 4V internal reference but you could tell it to use 2V then double the gains of the op-amps.I guess that's a lot of work and just using a boost SMPS is easier. Or have two Lipo cells.> Then one more MT3608 for the 12V-12,7V for the LM358 DriverAs you say, it's 12V-12,7V. And the "5V" supply might be a bit low. I designed the circuit assuming that the supply voltages would be exact but they never are. The 47k/33k potential dividers that go into the ADCs make 12V into 4.95V which is awfully close to the 5V limit of the ADCs. You can begin to lose the left-hand part when you draw the curves of a PNP. Maybe I should have chosen 15k/10k or 56k/33k.> and perhaps one MT3608 for testing Zener_Diodes between 1.5V and 28V (the limit of the MT3608).Yes. That would be useful.The Arduino code automatically recognises when a component is inserted and draws the graph. If I remember right, it tests the component with a 6V supply. So it won't see a 9V Zener. Maybe I should have added a "Draw the graph now" button on the menu screen.Peter

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  • Peter Balch commented on Peter Balch's instructable Transistor Curve Tracer18 days ago
    Transistor Curve Tracer

    The ILI9341 chip has its own internal screen buffer memory. You send commands to it over an SPI bus or a parallel bus. Parallel is faster, of course but uses a lot more Arduino pins. If you're buying a module on eBay, look at the pin-names in the photo: are they MOSI, SCK, etc. or D0, D1, D2, ...?The commands you send to it are pretty basic: you define an n*m rectangle on the screen then send the n*m 16-bit words for the pixels to fill it. So all the cleverness to draw lines or characters is in the Arduino. The libraries you can download are of variable quality - some just don't work, some are fast and some are slow. Fast is more prone to timing problems and the ones I tried had trouble sharing the SPI bus with other devices. So my library is slower: it takes just over 2 sec to draw the...

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    The ILI9341 chip has its own internal screen buffer memory. You send commands to it over an SPI bus or a parallel bus. Parallel is faster, of course but uses a lot more Arduino pins. If you're buying a module on eBay, look at the pin-names in the photo: are they MOSI, SCK, etc. or D0, D1, D2, ...?The commands you send to it are pretty basic: you define an n*m rectangle on the screen then send the n*m 16-bit words for the pixels to fill it. So all the cleverness to draw lines or characters is in the Arduino. The libraries you can download are of variable quality - some just don't work, some are fast and some are slow. Fast is more prone to timing problems and the ones I tried had trouble sharing the SPI bus with other devices. So my library is slower: it takes just over 2 sec to draw the screen. It also occupies a lot less of the Arduino's program memory.

    Wow. That's exactly what I've been working on for the last few days!I've got a Nano to give me over 1M samples per second with 8 bits. There's a bit of noise but it's useable. At 500k sps or less, it's decent quality. The trick is not to use interrupts - the overhead is too big.The Girino is a very good start but it can't sample so fast and it doesn't have a display:https://www.instructables.com/id/Girino-Fast-Arduino-Oscilloscope/

    Thank you. Please build one. I'd love it if it became a group project like the LCR-T4.The design is a compromise and maybe I made the wrong decisions. Is 12V the right voltage? Is 50mA the right current? What about the base/gate currents and voltages. It's meant to work with an "average" component but what does that mean? It had to be easy to build rather than have the dozens of knobs of a Tektronix 576.

    Further to the suggestion of an oscilloscope as the next project ...Search eBay for DSO138. It's a digital oscilloscope for just over £10 Maximum sampling rate : 1Msps Sampling buffer depth : 1024 bytes Analog bandwidth : 0 - 200KHz Vertical Sensitivity : 10mV / Div - 5V / Div Maximum input : 50Vpp (1: 1 probe ), 400Vpp (10: 1 probe ) Time base range : 10μs / Div - 50s / Div ( 1-2-5 progressive manner )It's going to be hard to compete with that. What I have is a room full of electronic Stuff including 4 oscilloscopes. It's a fuss to use a proper 'scope. Often, all I want is presence/absence of signal. A year ago I built a 15x13x6cm box with a breadboard on the top. Inside is a Serial->USB, a PIC programmer and a Sealey logic analyser. What's nice is that it's self-contai...

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    Further to the suggestion of an oscilloscope as the next project ...Search eBay for DSO138. It's a digital oscilloscope for just over £10 Maximum sampling rate : 1Msps Sampling buffer depth : 1024 bytes Analog bandwidth : 0 - 200KHz Vertical Sensitivity : 10mV / Div - 5V / Div Maximum input : 50Vpp (1: 1 probe ), 400Vpp (10: 1 probe ) Time base range : 10μs / Div - 50s / Div ( 1-2-5 progressive manner )It's going to be hard to compete with that. What I have is a room full of electronic Stuff including 4 oscilloscopes. It's a fuss to use a proper 'scope. Often, all I want is presence/absence of signal. A year ago I built a 15x13x6cm box with a breadboard on the top. Inside is a Serial->USB, a PIC programmer and a Sealey logic analyser. What's nice is that it's self-contained and so small. I hardly use the rest of the workbench (or benches!).I'm thinking I'll add a voltmeter module and a 'scope with a 1.3" screen. Small is nice.Any thoughts?

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  • Peter Balch's instructable Transistor Curve Tracer's weekly stats: 19 days ago
    • Transistor Curve Tracer
      1,960 views
      38 favorites
      6 comments
  • Girino - Fast Arduino Oscilloscope

    Hi, thanks for a great Instructable.I'm building the 'scope and have hit a couple of problems. The "HardwareSerial" compiler error is straightforward to overcome. As is working out which pin is which (the ADC is A0, the comparator is D6 and D7). My main problem is speed.It works reliably with a prescaler of 128, 64 or 32. After I added womai's changes, it worked at prescaler=16 but it is unreliable at 8 - I get a couple of scans and then it freezes. It freezes immediately at prescaler=4 or 2. I'm using a 328p at 16MHz.What speed did you get it to run at? You were doing it 6 years ago; could the ISR overhead be bigger with newer libraries?Two minor problems:Only the Toggle trigger mode seems to work. If I choose Rising or Falling, it still triggers on "change". Any th...

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    Hi, thanks for a great Instructable.I'm building the 'scope and have hit a couple of problems. The "HardwareSerial" compiler error is straightforward to overcome. As is working out which pin is which (the ADC is A0, the comparator is D6 and D7). My main problem is speed.It works reliably with a prescaler of 128, 64 or 32. After I added womai's changes, it worked at prescaler=16 but it is unreliable at 8 - I get a couple of scans and then it freezes. It freezes immediately at prescaler=4 or 2. I'm using a 328p at 16MHz.What speed did you get it to run at? You were doing it 6 years ago; could the ISR overhead be bigger with newer libraries?Two minor problems:Only the Toggle trigger mode seems to work. If I choose Rising or Falling, it still triggers on "change". Any thoughts? (I've checked that ACSR gets the right value)There's a small bug if you set e.g. waitDuration=ADCBUFFERSIZE-100 so you can see before the trigger event. The region before the trigger is often mostly zeros. I guess what's wrong is: the circular buffer is initialised to zero; start recording; the trigger happens after 20 samples; so there are 80 un-filled slots. The answer is probably to not allow the trigger until at least 100 samples have been recorded.

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  • Peter Balch commented on Peter Balch's instructable Transistor Curve Tracer25 days ago
    Transistor Curve Tracer

    I do hope you make one. If you need any advice or find any bugs, please let me know."In the next few days" - wow. You're faster than me. The order I did it was: get the display working, then the DAC, etc. running off a bench power supply and finally the regulators and SMPS.

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  • How Rotary Encoder Works With Arduino!

    Actually, bouncing isn't a problem with the algorithm that Nemeen has chosen.The wrong way to do it is to count on (say) the rising edge of the Clock: if Data is high, count up; if Data is low, count down. If the switch bounces then you'll get multiple counts.The right way is to count on both the up and down edges of the Clock. If Data != Clock then count up, otherwise count down. Bouncing counts both up and down so cancels out.However AFAIK, you really must sample both Clock and Data at the same instant. In Nemeen's code, the Clock is sampled then the Data several instructions later. That's wrong. The Data may have changed.Instead, one should read a whole byte, e.g.int i = PORTD;then look at the individual bits of i.I suspect it may be a bad idea to add RC filtering to the inputs - the...

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    Actually, bouncing isn't a problem with the algorithm that Nemeen has chosen.The wrong way to do it is to count on (say) the rising edge of the Clock: if Data is high, count up; if Data is low, count down. If the switch bounces then you'll get multiple counts.The right way is to count on both the up and down edges of the Clock. If Data != Clock then count up, otherwise count down. Bouncing counts both up and down so cancels out.However AFAIK, you really must sample both Clock and Data at the same instant. In Nemeen's code, the Clock is sampled then the Data several instructions later. That's wrong. The Data may have changed.Instead, one should read a whole byte, e.g.int i = PORTD;then look at the individual bits of i.I suspect it may be a bad idea to add RC filtering to the inputs - the filters may have different time-constants. You need to know what's happening in a single instant.Peter

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  • Peter Balch commented on paperplateandplane's instructable DIY Kit Kat Molds7 weeks ago
    DIY Kit Kat Molds

    My father was chief engineer at Rowntrees and was the one person in the factory who had the formula for the volume of a Kit Kat. It was quite complicated when he showed it to me - it was written in pencil on the back of an envelope (or perhaps that's just in my imagination).He explained that as the price of chocolate increased he would re-design the moulds to be smaller and smaller until the biscuit started showing through. Then he would increase the size and Rowntrees would put up the price.

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  • Peter Balch commented on Matlek's instructable DIY Bone Conduction Bike Helmet 2 months ago
    DIY Bone Conduction Bike Helmet

    Let's think about the direction of the vibration.To transmit from the surface of the head to the cochlea I guess the transducer has to move in/out (relative to the head). Moving along the surface of the skin isn't going to work as well.The rotor of the motor rotates - which translates into a vibration along the surface of the motor. Which becomes movement along the surface of the skin. Not at right-angles to the skin.Clipping it into the T-piece makes the whole T-piece try to rotate. So the ends are moving in/out of the head.In my mind, the T-piece doesn't just hold the motor in place, it changes the direction of the vibration from along the skin to at right-angles to the skin.The attached image might explain better what I mean.

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  • Peter Balch commented on Matlek's instructable DIY Bone Conduction Bike Helmet 2 months ago
    DIY Bone Conduction Bike Helmet

    How do you think the motor works to stimulate the ears? If you hold the motor against your skin with just your fingers, can you hear the music - in other words, is the motor itself vibrating? Or is there a reaction torque to the motor trying to turn which is transmitted to the T-shaped clip holding the motor?Is the T-shape an essential part of the design?

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  • Eye of Horus, Open Source Eye Tracking Assistance

    Very nice. What IR filter do you use?

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  • Peter Balch's instructable Magic Lantern Revamp's weekly stats: 3 months ago
    • Magic Lantern Revamp
      670 views
      8 favorites
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  • Peter Balch's instructable LCD COG for an Arduino Nano's weekly stats: 3 months ago
    • LCD COG for an Arduino Nano
      163 views
      8 favorites
      0 comments
  • Plastic Smoothie - DIY Plastic Recycling

    Have you considered putting the warm sheet through a pasta maker to get a more consistent thickness?

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  • Peter Balch commented on Peter Balch's instructable Closeup Magnifying Glasses6 months ago
    Closeup Magnifying Glasses

    Good question: I just measured it. From the "distant" (objective) lenses to the workpiece is 90mm (3.5"). From the bridge of my nose to the "distant" lenses is 80mm (3.2"). So that's a total of 170mm (6.7").I used 3.5 dioptre lenses. A bit of high school physics tells me that from the the bridge of my nose to the workpiece ought to be 193mm (7.6"). That's about 20mm more than I found in practice. I'm slightly short sighted so it's prboably about right.If I had used 3 dioptre lenses then the total distance would be 217mm (8.5"). That's all a lot closer than the 16 to 18 inches you want from your nose to your embroidery. It's hard to say what the magnification is. My jeweler's loupe doesn't "magnify" at all. What it does is allow me ...

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    Good question: I just measured it. From the "distant" (objective) lenses to the workpiece is 90mm (3.5"). From the bridge of my nose to the "distant" lenses is 80mm (3.2"). So that's a total of 170mm (6.7").I used 3.5 dioptre lenses. A bit of high school physics tells me that from the the bridge of my nose to the workpiece ought to be 193mm (7.6"). That's about 20mm more than I found in practice. I'm slightly short sighted so it's prboably about right.If I had used 3 dioptre lenses then the total distance would be 217mm (8.5"). That's all a lot closer than the 16 to 18 inches you want from your nose to your embroidery. It's hard to say what the magnification is. My jeweler's loupe doesn't "magnify" at all. What it does is allow me to hold the workpiece closer to my eye. The result is that It is in focus while it is 7 times closer. So I suppose you could say that the magnification is 7 times. By that measure, the "magnifying glasses" magnify by about 3.5 times.I hope that helpsPeter

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  • Peter Balch commented on Peter Balch's instructable A Wheeled Steampunk Mouse7 months ago
    A Wheeled Steampunk Mouse

    Thanks.Yes, papier mache for the bottom of the shell and tinplate for the top. I tried a variety of materials but papier mache turned out to be the easiest to get the shape I wanted. I suspect that vacuum-formed polystyrene sheet would be better but the vacuum-cleaner powered former I made doesn't work well enough.I'm a huge fan of tinplate as a modelmaking material. It's strong and easy to cut and solder. Decades ago when my son was a toddler he lived on formula milk and I saved all the tinplate cans. So I've got a lifetime supply.

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  • Peter Balch commented on mikeasaurus's instructable Unusual Uses for WD-4010 months ago
    Unusual Uses for WD-40

    Never use WD-40 to "fix" a clock. The clock will begin to work well but when the solvent evaporates, the sticky residue will gum-up the works.Clockmaker discussion groups are full of complaints about how hard it is to repair damage from WD-40. The answer is to spray the clock again with WD-40 to dissolve the gunk then clean it all off with your favourite solvent. Then lubricate with proper clock oil.

    Hipsters, steampunks and assorted young people who have romatic notions about the past. Old typewriters sell well.It's also good for (unobtainable) dot-matrix printer ribbons and the like if you're into retro computing.

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  • Peter Balch commented on mikeasaurus's instructable Unusual Uses for WD-4010 months ago
    Unusual Uses for WD-40

    Margarine is better for cleaning ingrained grease on hands. Rub in the margarine. Then rub in washing-up liquid. Then rinse under water.Margarine works well because it is full of emulsifiers and fats. Plus the fats help stop your skin drying out.

    Margarine is better for cleaning ingrained grease on hands. Rub in the margarine. Then rub in washing-up liquid. Then rinse under water.Margarine works well because it is full of emulsifiers and fats. As a bonus, the fats help stop your skin drying out.

    Margarine is better for cleaning ingrained grease on hands. Rub in the margarine. Then rub in washing-up liquid. Then rinse under water.Margarine works well because it is full of emulsifiers and fats. Plus the fats help stop your skin drying out.

    WD-40 will restore a typewriter ribbon that has dried-out.

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  • Peter Balch's instructable Servo Sequencer's weekly stats: 1 year ago
    • Servo Sequencer
      82 views
      6 favorites
      2 comments
  • Peter Balch commented on Peter Balch's instructable A Steampunk Orrery-Clock1 year ago
    A Steampunk Orrery-Clock

    Google for "pyramid clock" then hit images (rather than shopping). I got around 20 hits. I've pasted in a few below. The prices vary enormously from $7 to $150. It's a huge compliment that that you've been inspired to make one.. Please do post the results. The dome, beads, etc are easy to find but I suspect that the difficulty might be finding a nice wooden box. It occurred to me that the black plastic base for a trophy could work well. Peter https://www.banggood.com/EMPO-Design-Concept-PVC-Pyramid-Decorative-Clock-p-912968.html https://www.evertek.com/viewpart.asp?auto=98338&cpc=RECOM http://www.ebay.com/itm/Ideal-Valentine-Gift-4-Time-Pyramid-Clock-A-Moving-Sculpture-Timepiece-/221746791818 https://www.myxlshop.co.uk/empo-pyramid-design-clock-empo.html?id=5016256...

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    Google for "pyramid clock" then hit images (rather than shopping). I got around 20 hits. I've pasted in a few below. The prices vary enormously from $7 to $150. It's a huge compliment that that you've been inspired to make one.. Please do post the results. The dome, beads, etc are easy to find but I suspect that the difficulty might be finding a nice wooden box. It occurred to me that the black plastic base for a trophy could work well. Peter https://www.banggood.com/EMPO-Design-Concept-PVC-Pyramid-Decorative-Clock-p-912968.html https://www.evertek.com/viewpart.asp?auto=98338&cpc=RECOM http://www.ebay.com/itm/Ideal-Valentine-Gift-4-Time-Pyramid-Clock-A-Moving-Sculpture-Timepiece-/221746791818 https://www.myxlshop.co.uk/empo-pyramid-design-clock-empo.html?id=50162560&gclid=CIP6zIHL4tQCFSa-7Qod32UNbg https://www.ebay.co.uk/i/252874985121?chn=ps&dispItem=1&adgroupid=45192390362&rlsatarget=pla-331477147172&abcId=1129006&adtype=pla&merchantid=113272112&poi=&googleloc=9046888&device=c&campaignid=861899495&crdt=0

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  • Peter Balch commented on Peter Balch's instructable A Wheeled Steampunk Mouse1 year ago
    A Wheeled Steampunk Mouse

    For this particular project I wanted wheels that really drove the mouse logic. I reckoned I had to start with a ball mouse. I couldn't see a compact way to connect wheels to the camera of an optical mouse. I've never seen a BT mouse with a ball. My experience with BT mice has been disappointing. I had to keep re-pairing them and the batteries didn't last long. And I had to remember to turn it off every night. Perhaps I was just unlucky with the mice I tried. Apple ones may well work better but I suspect that the re-pairing is a Windows problem.Of course, there's an instructable for a Qi mouse:https://www.instructables.com/id/Make-wireless-charging-mouse/

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  • Peter Balch commented on Peter Balch's instructable A Wheeled Steampunk Mouse1 year ago
    A Wheeled Steampunk Mouse

    Thanks. Yes it took forever.I hadn't realised that Apple mice could be used with Windows. It seems you need a special driver and possibly even a special Bluetooth dongle. Not ideal but worth knowing.

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  • Peter Balch's instructable Vintage Intercom Re-purposing's weekly stats: 1 year ago
    • Vintage Intercom Re-purposing
      898 views
      23 favorites
      1 comments
  • Peter Balch's instructable A Steampunk Disk Drive USB Meter's weekly stats: 1 year ago
    • A Steampunk Disk Drive USB Meter
      5,557 views
      98 favorites
      2 comments
  • Peter Balch's instructable Closeup Magnifying Glasses's weekly stats: 1 year ago
    • Closeup Magnifying Glasses
      785 views
      27 favorites
      3 comments
  • Peter Balch's instructable A Steampunk Orrery-Clock's weekly stats: 1 year ago
    • A Steampunk Orrery-Clock
      1,667 views
      78 favorites
      0 comments
  • Peter Balch commented on Peter Balch's instructable Closeup Magnifying Glasses1 year ago
    Closeup Magnifying Glasses

    40 years? A mere trifle!As my lenses begin to crystalise and I can't change focus the flip-up action becomes essential.

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  • Peter Balch's instructable A Wheeled Steampunk Mouse's weekly stats: 1 year ago
    • A Wheeled Steampunk Mouse
      1,911 views
      69 favorites
      6 comments
  • Peter Balch's instructable A Sgian-dubh memory stick's weekly stats: 1 year ago
    • A Sgian-dubh memory stick
      1,610 views
      22 favorites
      5 comments
  • Peter Balch commented on Peter Balch's instructable A Wheeled Steampunk Mouse1 year ago
    A Wheeled Steampunk Mouse

    Is it a ball mouse or optical? If it's optical, you could have a look at my Steampunk Brain Mousehttp://www.peterbalch.co.uk/MousePunk.htmand there are some excellent Instructables already here.

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  • Peter Balch commented on Peter Balch's instructable A Wheeled Steampunk Mouse1 year ago
    A Wheeled Steampunk Mouse

    The question with wireless mice is: should you choose one with Bluetooth or its own proprietry receiver dongle. I bought a Bluetooth mouse for a project like this and found that it needed pairing almost every time I used it. A proprietry receiver dongle never needs to be paired but you can only use it with the computer it's plugged into. My other disappointment was that all the radio mice I've tried really eat batteries - even when they're in standby mode.Maybe a rechargeable mouse with a Qi charger is the answer. Radio mice often turn up in car-boot sales and charity shops but make sure they haven't got separated from their dongle.Good luck with the project and please do publish what you make.

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  • Peter Balch commented on Peter Balch's instructable A Sgian-dubh Memory Stick1 year ago
    A Sgian-dubh Memory Stick

    Thank you - my son's idea not mine.

    The box was another £0.50 from a car-boot sale. I'm a big fan of car-boot sales.I'll try to post some more instructables for other things tomorrow.

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