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RCs Stuff

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  • The Best Chocolate Shortbread Cookies Ever

    Since salt can & is sometimes used to enhance the flavor of chocolate, would salted butter, perhaps, be more suitable or at least an OK choice of ingredient over unsalted butter?

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  • Using Wood to Fuel a Generator! (How to Build a Wood Gasifier W/Demonstration)

    This, Mr. Randomonium, is a work of pure genius. To paraphrase, you asked, why doesn't more people try to use something like this? My thoughts as to why is, a majority of people are probably put off by the idea of using ''scrounged'' materials to build a project. I do hope you aren't offended if I refer to you as a ''scrounger''. I'm a fellow scrounger & am very proud to be one. I may offend some of those people who don't scrounge, don't weld (may not know how to), & don't know how to cobble (I again hope I don't offend you by using this word, but I cobble some things quite often. To me, it's another word for experimenting), but these people don't realize how much fun they're missing. My personal favorite scrounged pieces are electric water heater tanks. They work great for a sm...

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    This, Mr. Randomonium, is a work of pure genius. To paraphrase, you asked, why doesn't more people try to use something like this? My thoughts as to why is, a majority of people are probably put off by the idea of using ''scrounged'' materials to build a project. I do hope you aren't offended if I refer to you as a ''scrounger''. I'm a fellow scrounger & am very proud to be one. I may offend some of those people who don't scrounge, don't weld (may not know how to), & don't know how to cobble (I again hope I don't offend you by using this word, but I cobble some things quite often. To me, it's another word for experimenting), but these people don't realize how much fun they're missing. My personal favorite scrounged pieces are electric water heater tanks. They work great for a small woodstove,waste oil heaters, a smoker/cooker, or a barbecue grill if mounted on it's side. They're heavier gauge steel than 55gal. barrels so they last a lot longer. Most people in my area tend to use empty Freon tanks & flushed out propane tanks as portable air tanks, but that's fine. As long as something scrounged is put to use or repurposed for something else is the main & most important issue. Anyway, I digress. What type of metal did you use to make your ''fire tube''? it appears to be stainless steel. I also had a question about the 1st filter ''tank''. You explained that a good deal of tar & particulate matter may accumulate within this tank. I couldn't see 1, but do you have any way of cleaning this tank out periodically by way of some form of opening? I would think that after using it a lot, the tar etc. might build up enough to affect the cyclonic air flow down through this filtering tank. I'm fairly certain that it'll need to be smooth, but any buildup of tar & debris could affect it's efficiency by impeding it's cyclonic airflow. Have you used it enough yet that you've begun to notice anything like this or does the tank stay hot enough that any tar that is caught by this tank stays fluid enough that it runs out into the collection jar. Also, you demonstrated in your video that the top of your radiator assembly was cool enough to lay your bare hand on. How hot did the top of your radiator feel? I have 1 of those laser thermometers I bought at an inexpensive tool store & have found it useful for countless things. They are a very handy tool for fabricators of heat generating projects & the 1 I purchased from the store with the initials of ''H. F.'' has worked great for me. You also spoke about using a ''long'' section of tubing between the generators output to the metal tube that feeds into your T/valve ''pre-carburetor'' to help catch any moisture etc. that may still be created. Have you tried adding another collection container to this tubing by putting a T in the tubing line? I believe my last question is, have you tried using wind power to vibrate your ''shaker grate'' & to use the rotating motion of the windmill to spin your blower? By ''spinning'' your blower, I don't mean using the windmill to generate electricity (although that is a possibility), but by using the mechanical rotation of the windmill to mechanically drive the blower. By stepping up the speed of the windmill's shaft with different sizes of pulleys & belts, sprockets & chains (salvaged or ''scrounged'' bicycles are another favorite of mine), or some form of gear drive to spin your blower would make it totally external power supply free. Using the mechanical movement of a windmill much like how the original Aermotor Windmills did to pump water is something I use to design rotating or spinning contraption ideas that pop into my mind. A person could use scrounged bed frames or railing (another favorite of mine), rebar, old antenna masts, conduit, 2X lumber, etc. to make a decent height windmill tower & use whatever you want (seems like I see something different everyday) for the windmill blades. Being a proud & fellow scrounger of ''everything'', I'm more than impressed with your project & I'm, at this moment, looking out my window at my scrap pile along with the heavily wooded 20+ acre area surrounding my house with a strongly renewed interest. I do hope & look forward to hearing back from you regarding my questions & wouldn't mind discussing other ideas. Again, a genius project using scrounged or repurposed (as I suppose it should be called) materials. Thank you for sharing this with us. You take care, Sir.

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  • RCs Stuff commented on flywoodkb's instructable Hot Wire Foam Cutter4 months ago
    Hot Wire Foam Cutter

    I deleted a comment or reply I made about the resistance measurement I took on the ''E'' of my guitar. I needed the information you provided before making a proper comment. Now, you've made it make sense. I thank you, Sir.

    Now I like this idea. The uses for computer power supplies are nearly endless.

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  • RCs Stuff commented on BonJiba's instructable Build Your Own CNC Milling Machine5 months ago
    Build Your Own CNC Milling Machine

    Much like you, I discussed the analog to digital transition with the builder of that CNC machine with it's maker, BonJiba. I thank you for the words of encouragement from another fellow former analog guy. BonJiba & I had a fair amount in common except for the fact that he'd made that transition very well & was now able to incorporate it into his projects, as we saw. I've been doing a lot of reading/studying of this digital or computer lingo as well as teaching myself about using Arduinos. It's been frustrating since a great deal of this ''lingo'' is merely abbreviated or altered forms of analog terms formerly used. As I told BonJiba, ''it's hard to teach an old dog new tricks''. To word it another way, it's hard for an old dog to teach himself new tricks.

    I replied to ''your'' reply, but since I did via email rather than through here, I'm guessing you didn't receive it. I got an email from Instructables telling me I needed to respond to a fellow gadget enthusiast through the site so the message would get to the intended person otherwise it basically went nowhere. I don't recall what I said in that message other than complementing you on your much more successful transition to digital electronics from analog than mine. Although I have been doing a lot of reading & studying, it's going to take some time for me to reteach myself in the ways & terminology of the current technology. At 57, it's hard for this old dog to learn new tricks. I'm sure that any ''young'' gadget enthusiast reading this would laugh. Since they were fortunate e...

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    I replied to ''your'' reply, but since I did via email rather than through here, I'm guessing you didn't receive it. I got an email from Instructables telling me I needed to respond to a fellow gadget enthusiast through the site so the message would get to the intended person otherwise it basically went nowhere. I don't recall what I said in that message other than complementing you on your much more successful transition to digital electronics from analog than mine. Although I have been doing a lot of reading & studying, it's going to take some time for me to reteach myself in the ways & terminology of the current technology. At 57, it's hard for this old dog to learn new tricks. I'm sure that any ''young'' gadget enthusiast reading this would laugh. Since they were fortunate enough to get educated at, perhaps, the beginning of as well as throughout the digital/computerized age, it might be difficult for them to understand how frustrating it is for a person to learn or understand all this new jargon, lingo, or language that's now being used in today's electronic world. Personally, I honestly hate it since there's already words formerly & still being used that mean the same thing as these abbreviated terms now used when discussing some form of electronic ''whatever''. Like I said, ''It's hard for an old dog to learn new tricks''.

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  • RCs Stuff commented on BonJiba's instructable Build Your Own CNC Milling Machine5 months ago
    Build Your Own CNC Milling Machine

    Although I don't believe you stated your age, you referred to yourself as old. I am old as well, but I would love to try to build this exceptional piece of work or at least one very similar. I'm an ''old'' analog guy so the programming of an Arduino may be an issue. I've been an electronic tech. for around 40 years & worked on/repaired almost everything that was either electrically or electronically controlled, but again, nearly all of it dealt with analog rather than digital circuitry. I've also built several electro-mechanical devices where I used relays, microswitches, etc. to control things. I was wondering how much of an issue it was for you to program the Arduino & where you got the info. or software to program it. If I can figure a way to use my relays & microswitches...

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    Although I don't believe you stated your age, you referred to yourself as old. I am old as well, but I would love to try to build this exceptional piece of work or at least one very similar. I'm an ''old'' analog guy so the programming of an Arduino may be an issue. I've been an electronic tech. for around 40 years & worked on/repaired almost everything that was either electrically or electronically controlled, but again, nearly all of it dealt with analog rather than digital circuitry. I've also built several electro-mechanical devices where I used relays, microswitches, etc. to control things. I was wondering how much of an issue it was for you to program the Arduino & where you got the info. or software to program it. If I can figure a way to use my relays & microswitches to operate this, I will, but since you used stepper motors, I'm afraid I'll have to go with the Arduino or something similar to control the steppers. I like to design & build speaker systems & I believe a machine like this could be handy when making the cutouts in the panels the speakers are mounted in so I could get a cleaner than freehand cutout. Thank you for sharing this machine you made with us. Take care, Sir.

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  • RCs Stuff commented on Techgenie's instructable DIY - Coil Winding Machine6 months ago
    DIY - Coil Winding Machine

    Hey, thanks for getting back to me with the info. you provided. In the years of experience I had with those reed switches, they worked better to count a slower RPM than a Hall effect sensor. They were sort of a fairly high failure rate component that were used in old C-Band satellite dish positioning actuators. Usually, most actuators had only 1 magnet on a geared down wheel & the reed switch would, of course, close & send a pulse back to be counted by the control box or receiver in the house. Some of the last Von Weiss brand actuators I installed came with a geared down wheel that had 6 or 8 magnets on it. Fortunately, you could take some magnets out because that was too many magnets for a reed switch to keep up with. Either too many pulses for the controller to accurately coun...

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    Hey, thanks for getting back to me with the info. you provided. In the years of experience I had with those reed switches, they worked better to count a slower RPM than a Hall effect sensor. They were sort of a fairly high failure rate component that were used in old C-Band satellite dish positioning actuators. Usually, most actuators had only 1 magnet on a geared down wheel & the reed switch would, of course, close & send a pulse back to be counted by the control box or receiver in the house. Some of the last Von Weiss brand actuators I installed came with a geared down wheel that had 6 or 8 magnets on it. Fortunately, you could take some magnets out because that was too many magnets for a reed switch to keep up with. Either too many pulses for the controller to accurately count would occur or the count would be different no matter how or what direction you moved the dish. No, they weren't very accurate when trying to count a higher speed RPM. One thing I meant to ask you was what method or what type of ''thing'' did you use to keep each turn of the windings tight against the previously wound turn. When I was young, I was constantly buying magnet wire at ''Radio Shack'' & making something that needed an electromagnet. Although I tried to make the windings neat, my patience would shorten & I would end up winding it as fast as I could yet still try to make it neat. Having to hold a finger against the wire while winding it slowed me down & shortened my patience. I tried to see in your photos what you may have used to keep the windings smooth & even, but couldn't see what I was looking for. I'd like to make 1 of these to wind inductor coils used in crossovers for speaker systems I build. Thanks again for the info. & take care.

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  • RCs Stuff followed Sensors, Reuse, Metalworking, Rockets and 48 others channel 6 months ago