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2Instructables7,782Views11CommentsLubbock, TXJoined February 9th, 2014
I'm a Data Scientist, looking for gravitational waves in LIGO data. I made guitars for my PhD in Physics and looked at how termites use vibrations to communicate. Even I find that weird! I have two dogs: one with 19 CHA, but 7 INT, while the other has 5 CHA but 19 INT and 16 DEX.

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Science of Cooking
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  • Raro77's instructable Blood Crystals's weekly stats: 6 weeks ago
    • Blood Crystals
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  • Raro77 entered Blood Crystals in the Frozen Treats Challenge contest 6 weeks ago
  • Raro77 made the instructable DIY Raised Bed Planter6 weeks ago
    DIY Raised Bed Planter

    Works well! Made it with two inch thick planks to avoid warping over time, which made it heavvvvy. Also put in rope handles (just drilled half-inch holes and threaded baling twine through, knotting each end before laying weed mat).

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  • AutoBooch — Automate Your Kombucha Brewing System With a Raspberry Pi

    Hey Vitaly,Some great questions.> Devs of Instructables might add reply to an answer option aka answer to an answerI'm with you there. I initially thought I screwed up my reply because it hadn't indented. Oh well, a work in progress I suppose.> he eats sugar faster than i can add it and eventually it produces a lot of vinegar which destroys the taste of the drink. Now i keep pellicle max 10cm thick. And it needs around 2-4 days to produce light kombucha. As i use it substantially for 2nd stage it's enough for me.Yep, I have certainly reduced my 1F brewing time substantially (but I do like it pretty vinegary). The good thing about paring your SCOBY down is that you can share it, or make other weird things with it. Or experiment with things like coffee etc. (never tried, but apparen...

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    Hey Vitaly,Some great questions.> Devs of Instructables might add reply to an answer option aka answer to an answerI'm with you there. I initially thought I screwed up my reply because it hadn't indented. Oh well, a work in progress I suppose.> he eats sugar faster than i can add it and eventually it produces a lot of vinegar which destroys the taste of the drink. Now i keep pellicle max 10cm thick. And it needs around 2-4 days to produce light kombucha. As i use it substantially for 2nd stage it's enough for me.Yep, I have certainly reduced my 1F brewing time substantially (but I do like it pretty vinegary). The good thing about paring your SCOBY down is that you can share it, or make other weird things with it. Or experiment with things like coffee etc. (never tried, but apparently it's a one-way street).> Sometimes i get more darker spots on top i suppose when it gets burned by undissolved crystals of sugarFor me at least, the coloration comes from the tea itself, as I use cheap white sugar and make sure it's dissolved well. It's far from a supersaturated solution too, so I doubt I have crystallization.> everything between #ffccXX - #ff77XXHa ha, nice! Spotted the web/full-stack dev ;)> Have you tried to keep the 1st stage jar closed(not fully, so it won't blow up, but enough to maximally limit access to oxygen?I *think* for the bacterial colonies to thrive, you require aerobic activity. Exactly how much, I'm not sure. That's the cool thing about the zoogleal mat, that it provides a somewhat impervious membrane. As for closing it up, I already have problems with my guy's multiple escape attempts! No way I'm sealing my current set-up ;)> Thank you for a tip, but i'm searching kind of a natural solution to keep things as simple as possible. I'll try idea with balloon on top of jar.This would certainly work—as long as your balloon was "large" (i.e. ~pressure rated) enough. It's actually a neat mechanical fuse, as the balloon would pop before your vessel exploded. However, it would still be messy!> Have you tried another sources of protein?No I haven't. I'm a cheap-skate, and inherited this idea from brewing other beverages. You can purchase special yeast nutrient packs for wine and beer. These contain vitamin B, I think a little soluble magnesium, iron and protein. But the right protein profile comes from the residue of yeast itself, which nutritional yeast is the same species (although likely a different strain). Some brewers keep their own 'bug' going by topping it up a little. Where I live, the water is quite hard (a lot of dissolved minerals) so is naturally great for brewing.Thanks so much for the discussion. Let me know how you go!Cheers,Ra

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  • AutoBooch — Automate Your Kombucha Brewing System With a Raspberry Pi

    Aha! It sounds like what you might have there is more of a COB—a Culture of Bacteria—than a SCOBY. An entirely different beast altogether. It would be better left as a scientific experiment than consumed. Although it still forms a zoogleal mat (sorry, I just love that term and try and use it frequently), it's from plain bacterial action on the milk from your tea.If you're really lucky, it may be some Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Streptococcus thermophilus, or *chime sounds* the revered Lactobacillus acidophilus, and you could make yoghurt out of it. But I wouldn't count on it, and it's easy enough to make your own yoghurt without resorting to the ol' forgotten workshop mug.Better off not risking food poisoning in the workshop, and stick to chucking it!

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  • AutoBooch — Automate Your Kombucha Brewing System With a Raspberry Pi

    Hey Vitalij!Good questions—I'm still learning myself :)> Your SCOBY pellicle is growing isn't it? How big(thick) do you keep it? And what do you do with remains? Do you keep the old one or new part of it?Yes, it grows in layers with each new batch. I have not done anything with it, just kept it au naturale. I wanted to keep the respective colonies in a high population in case any rival yeast or bacteria try to invade. It also provides a physical barrier to the air, so the only exposure to the air is via the pellicle, so the only means of oxidation is via the bacteria in the colony matrix. It's something of a monster now, very thick and leathery at the top with lots of tendrils at the bottom. But started as a wee guy, a thin layer in a bowl from a bottle of kombucha. However, it...

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    Hey Vitalij!Good questions—I'm still learning myself :)> Your SCOBY pellicle is growing isn't it? How big(thick) do you keep it? And what do you do with remains? Do you keep the old one or new part of it?Yes, it grows in layers with each new batch. I have not done anything with it, just kept it au naturale. I wanted to keep the respective colonies in a high population in case any rival yeast or bacteria try to invade. It also provides a physical barrier to the air, so the only exposure to the air is via the pellicle, so the only means of oxidation is via the bacteria in the colony matrix. It's something of a monster now, very thick and leathery at the top with lots of tendrils at the bottom. But started as a wee guy, a thin layer in a bowl from a bottle of kombucha. However, it might be time to start sharing it, as I can't let it grow indefinitely!> I am wondering about dark brown coloration you have on pellicle - how old is it or what is it? I have little lighter brown coloration, but on downside of pellicle. Upwards it's clean and shiny, like everything around that dark spot.It's a complex interaction, but I believe light and dark brown, or beige, is fairly healthy. It has gotten darker with age, but I think part of the loss of translucence is because there are so many layers of material. I have only ever had successful primary fermentation, which is a little more than one per week for almost eight months now. However, I have seen a lot of photos of weird colorations, such as black, white or dark red mold on top, usually with the obligatory "Is my SCOBY OK?". I think the answer there is usually "no," but I don't know how to tell from just the color alone.> Maybe you know some method or tool like brewers airlock but with manual control of over-pressure level? It would be awesome to have fizzy drink in high volume.If this is what you're after, what about a 'kegerator' or other carbonation system (one brand is 'SodaStream')? Then you'll only be limited by the rate of your primary. Personally, my second ferment is faster than my primary, so it's the rate limiting step anyway. But, to answer your first part, I have no idea of a continuous 2F; I find it hard to picture mentally because you want to limit exposure to oxygen, and retain pressure so the carbon dioxide dissolves adequately. > Have you tested alcohol content in it?No. But I'd really like to! Problem is, it's hard to tell using the specific gravity because the final products (both primary and secondary fermentation stage) are such complex mixtures. I have a refractometer, but the residual sugars and things like acetate throw it off. So that leaves mass spectrometry (which I don't have). Maybe that's another Instructable? ;)Cheers,Ra

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  • AutoBooch — Automate Your Kombucha Brewing System With a Raspberry Pi

    Ahhh, I see. Well there are plenty of other variables!For your primary fermentation, are you using plain black tea? And plain sugar? Is your vessel non-metallic?Getting enough effervescence can be tricky. In that stage, you want the fermentation to be anaerobic, so fill your secondary vessels almost completely. Some people recommend 'burping'—periodic release of pressure by opening the caps, but I found that made my product weakly fizzy. Now I just let it go without looking at it. I haven't had an explosion yet (touch wood).You definitely could use an aquarium heater. The only thing is that you have to figure out a way to get it to sit right in your fermenter (without interfering with your SCOBY pellicle) and then you have to clean it periodically. Another issue is that it's a cen...

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    Ahhh, I see. Well there are plenty of other variables!For your primary fermentation, are you using plain black tea? And plain sugar? Is your vessel non-metallic?Getting enough effervescence can be tricky. In that stage, you want the fermentation to be anaerobic, so fill your secondary vessels almost completely. Some people recommend 'burping'—periodic release of pressure by opening the caps, but I found that made my product weakly fizzy. Now I just let it go without looking at it. I haven't had an explosion yet (touch wood).You definitely could use an aquarium heater. The only thing is that you have to figure out a way to get it to sit right in your fermenter (without interfering with your SCOBY pellicle) and then you have to clean it periodically. Another issue is that it's a centralised source of heat, so you have to be careful to not burn anything with it. The beauty of the brewing/propagating mat is that it's pretty gentle and the heat is distributed across the bottom. Funnily enough, the reason why my Raspberry Pi is located where it is in this Instructable is because one of its other duties is to automate the lights (still aren't happy with my automated fish feeding project :( ).

    *automate the lights—in my aquarium :s

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  • AutoBooch — Automate Your Kombucha Brewing System With a Raspberry Pi

    Thank you! I had to look up Jun tea. Looks very cool! Maybe if I get brave, I may try making it sometime too.Yes, I had considered PID (partly because I haven't tinkered with PID control systems but would like to). However, the specific heat capacity is so high (4 litres of water, plus I keep the 2F vessels in thermal contact, so close to 8 litres) that sampling every half an hour means that the temperature profile tends to be very linear, so no need to integrate. Unfortunately I only started logging the state of this guy in the last month or so (I made the system about seven months ago), so I can't give as rich a data-set as I'd like. However, I should display the performance data.

    Hi Richie!Did you manage to get a SCOBY pellicle formed? This is a sensitive time, you have to have a bit of patience until you get the gelatinous layer forming. Re: the secondary fermentation: to be honest, most of the time I don't use the brewer's airlock, as this doesn't give maximum effervescence. I usually use fully sealed glass containers that can handle a fair bit of over-pressure, and fill them almost to the top, to mimimize exposure to oxygen. The one you see in the photo here is banana, which I found tends to brew so violently that I use an airlock for it. Note that I'm pretty sure the alcohol content was a lot higher than other brews I've made. Be warned! ;)Let me know if I can clarify anything further.

    Oh, and I forgot to answer on the timing... This comes down to your personal preference. If you like it drier and sour-er (which I do), then do the primary fermentation for longer. I do it for six days to a week. Secondary is usually well done in three days. You have to be very careful when opening the vessel (I sieve off the crud that floats to the top before refrigerating)!

    Thanks for that!Would you mind if I link this in the article too?Cheers,Ra

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    • AutoBooch — Automate Your Kombucha Brewing System With a Raspberry Pi
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  • Raro77 followed StevenW184 and JonasI31 year ago
  • 36 Things to Cook in a Coffee Maker

    Wow! I just love the variety of food possibilities. Now I'm planning my next gourmet three course meal when stuck in a cheap hotel!

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