author
1Instructables1,138Views7CommentsBrooklyn New YorkJoined September 19th, 2016
Needless to say Sarah and Vlad adore animals. Sarah hails from rural Lakeview, Oregon while Vlad comes from the lovely Riga, Latvia. After being lucky enough to have found each other in busy New York City Vlad and Sarah wanted to share their home with some four legged fur balls. Having adopted the loves of their lives, three tiny dogs (Maybe, Penny, and Sabrina) and two mushable cats (Marsha and LeBron), Sarah and Vlad felt they could still do more. A sad conversation with a neighbor rega... Read More »
  • Cat Trap Cover (Tomahawk Neighborhood Cat Trap 36”)

    Dear Justin, You can totally use a larger piece of fabric and cut out the whole piece in one go. To get the best results I would recommend finding the final measurements by subtracting the one inch seam allowance from the instructions and making a template out of paper. Once you have the template you can double check it fits your trap properly and start cutting. If you don't want to use a sewing machine you could make the covers out of polar fleece, it doesn't unravel, shouldn't shrink, and is good for blocking out light to keep the cats comfy and calm. Happy trapping!

    You can totally use a larger piece of fabric and cut out the whole piece in one go. To get the best results I would recommend finding the final measurements by subtracting the one inch seam allowance from the instructions and making a template out of paper. Once you have the template you can double check it fits your trap properly and start cutting. If you don't want to use a sewing machine you could make the covers out of polar fleece, it doesn't unravel, shouldn't shrink, and is good for blocking out light to keep the cats comfy and calm.

    Dear Justin, You can totally use a larger piece of fabric and cut out the whole piece in one go. To get the best results I would recommend finding the final measurements by subtracting the one inch seam allowance from the instructions and making a template out of paper. Once you have the template you can double check it fits your trap properly and start cutting. If you don't want to use a sewing machine you could make the covers out of polar fleece, it doesn't unravel, shouldn't shrink, and is good for blocking out light to keep the cats comfy and calm. Happy trapping!

    You can totally use a larger piece of fabric and cut out the whole piece in one go. To get the best results I would recommend finding the final measurements by subtracting the one inch seam allowance from the instructions and making a template out of paper. Once you have the template you can double check it fits your trap properly and start cutting. If you don't want to use a sewing machine you could make the covers out of polar fleece, it doesn't unravel, shouldn't shrink, and is good for blocking out light to keep the cats comfy and calm.

    View Instructable »
  • Cat Trap Cover (Tomahawk Neighborhood Cat Trap 36”)

    We use traps for our TNVR (Trap, Neuter, Vaccinate, and Return) projects. We call neighborhood cats Community Cats and to get them fixed and vaccinated; after this process we return the cat to where their neighborhood so they may remain in their community until they have lived out their life cycle. If properly cared for Community Cats can be an asset to their community as they prevent new, unvaccinated cats from moving in (the vacuum effect) and keep rats and mice away (even without hunting). Most "problems" end when a Community Cat has been altered and vaccinated. However, if problems are still happening such as foot prints on cars or using flowerbeds as litter boxes we work with the neighbor to help resolve the issue. We do not condone the removal of a Community Cat un...

    see more »

    We use traps for our TNVR (Trap, Neuter, Vaccinate, and Return) projects. We call neighborhood cats Community Cats and to get them fixed and vaccinated; after this process we return the cat to where their neighborhood so they may remain in their community until they have lived out their life cycle. If properly cared for Community Cats can be an asset to their community as they prevent new, unvaccinated cats from moving in (the vacuum effect) and keep rats and mice away (even without hunting). Most "problems" end when a Community Cat has been altered and vaccinated. However, if problems are still happening such as foot prints on cars or using flowerbeds as litter boxes we work with the neighbor to help resolve the issue. We do not condone the removal of a Community Cat unless they are in danger. Hopefully this answers your question, if not let me know and I would be happy to share links and information with you. :)

    View Instructable »