author
12CommentsWestville, NJ, USAJoined September 10th, 2015
Maker specializing in Joule Thief circuits. Also can do software development, tinkercad, music composition. Aspires to 3D print a conventional flashlight from start to finish, including the circuit board.
  • StephenA21 made the instructable How to Make the Metal Melter6 months ago
    How to Make the Metal Melter

    With a Microwave Oven Transformer, removed the fine-wired secondary, replaced it with the biggest jumper cable I could get from Wal-Mart, I think it was 4 guage. King of Random recommends 2 guage. I think I agree with him, as this heats up after only about 15 to 25 minutes of fun. Was able to weld small tin cans together and cut through thin aluminum. Makes a very pleasing humming sound, and yes, that is some flame in my picture. Can not recommend enough, especially for fathers and sons together -- there's something about melting that brightens the eyes!

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  • StephenA21 commented on The King of Random's instructable METAL MELTER!6 months ago
    METAL MELTER!

    No. Don't do this. Your circuit breaker should trip, but you could cause a fire. If you really want to know for sure, go to electrical engineering stack exchange and ask your question again.

    I made one of these, and it works, so I know what I'm talking about -- don't remove the primary (the thicker wire). Remove the secondary (the much thinner wire), and replace with a few turns of really thick copper wire -- I used the thickest jumper cables I could find at walmart, and that worked very well.

    Max current would be achieved by a single turn.

    It can melt rebar, but only a small amount, as it heats up very quickly. More turns might be better. (I made this and used 4 turns of jumper cable from Wal-Mart, and mine heats up in about 15-25 minutes of use).I once worked at a powder metal plant, where they would actually melt the iron (I estimate swimming-pool size pool of iron) this way. It was called an induction furnace, but it seemed to work by conduction, because they had two huge electrodes that they would plunge into the ladle, but I am not sure. All I AM sure of was the awesome humming sound as they pumped energy into the thing, and my metal melter makes a similarly satisfying hum. Oh, yes, and the last day I was there, the molten steel worked its way through the fire brick and contacted the underlying water jacket, result...

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    It can melt rebar, but only a small amount, as it heats up very quickly. More turns might be better. (I made this and used 4 turns of jumper cable from Wal-Mart, and mine heats up in about 15-25 minutes of use).I once worked at a powder metal plant, where they would actually melt the iron (I estimate swimming-pool size pool of iron) this way. It was called an induction furnace, but it seemed to work by conduction, because they had two huge electrodes that they would plunge into the ladle, but I am not sure. All I AM sure of was the awesome humming sound as they pumped energy into the thing, and my metal melter makes a similarly satisfying hum. Oh, yes, and the last day I was there, the molten steel worked its way through the fire brick and contacted the underlying water jacket, resulting in a powerful explosion, and molten steel on floor of the plant, which they later had to jack-hammer out. They would create steel powder by taking a stream of steel pouring out the bottom, and having a stream of water intersecting it at right angles, for a sustained explosion that created an iron powder that they later added different things to (copper powder, nickel powder, graphite or carbon, and sometimes other things like chromium, molybdenum, and manganese, along with a binder, a kind of glue, that kept things from separating out.) We would use tons of hydraulic pressure on the powder poured into a die to press out a metal part, that then went through a sintering furnace to produce the finished part. I was on university co-operative education assignment as a Research and Development technician, and we were trying to develop better binders (glues). I would test the hardness, toughness of small bricks (2" x 0.25" x 1").

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  • Joule Thief LED With Dead Battery - No Toriod

    When you added the second inductor, what was it? Thanks.

    Some inductors look just like resistors. Search digikey.com for 78F331J-RC at https://www.digikey.com/products/en?keywords=78F331J-RC or 78F221J-RC at https://www.digikey.com/products/en?keywords=78F221J-RC. These are both about 25 cents, and about 7 to 11 ohms, and are a green or blue with band around them, making them look just like resistors.

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  • StephenA21 commented on Donald Bell's instructable Make Beautiful Solder Joints1 year ago
    Make Beautiful Solder Joints

    I've done this before, and like the results. But I wanted everyone to know about a possible complication, which sort of reinforces the warning given by the author not to do this on important circuits.Shortening the leads like this allows the component to fall out partially if you hit both leads at the same time (like with 5mm white indicator LEDs) or if you switch too quickly from one lead to the other. And you may not be able to tell if one of the leads has a poor connection, because the smoothness of the finish hides whether the lead is in or out. So, I try to keep track of the component position and angle especially, as well as reinspect after finishing. And I also tend to do all left leads at once, and then all right leads in a separate operation, thereby ensuring that both lead...

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    I've done this before, and like the results. But I wanted everyone to know about a possible complication, which sort of reinforces the warning given by the author not to do this on important circuits.Shortening the leads like this allows the component to fall out partially if you hit both leads at the same time (like with 5mm white indicator LEDs) or if you switch too quickly from one lead to the other. And you may not be able to tell if one of the leads has a poor connection, because the smoothness of the finish hides whether the lead is in or out. So, I try to keep track of the component position and angle especially, as well as reinspect after finishing. And I also tend to do all left leads at once, and then all right leads in a separate operation, thereby ensuring that both leads aren't in the melted state at the same time. This way of soldering also reduces the chance of overheating a component, since you're allowing it to cool down before heating up the other side. Hope this helps.

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