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2Instructables52,945Views6CommentsCramlington, Northumberland.Joined November 14th, 2015
Hi, So, I'm Alex. I'm an aspiring Blacksmith, and I like to make props and costume pieces for Comic Conventions and LARP, ranging from the depths of science-fiction to the darkest forests of Tolkienesque fantasy. I do quite a bit of research into Nordic and Celtic cultures too, and try and re-create stuff to do with that. If you like some of the stuff that I've done and would like to see more, please check out my Facebook page (the link is above) where I post regular updates about other proj... Read More »

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  • World's easiest silicone mold.

    Heya, i'm along with you. i'd love a reply from the author, but I *believe*, and don't quote me on this, that the first mould, once cured, could have a thin coating of Vaseline or thinned petroleum jelly (thinned with meths or whatnot) and then the second layer of silicone could be placed over. Like, take an ice cream tub- one of the 2 litre ones, squidge your silicone into that and push your object into that up to the mould mark halfway. then, let it cure. put the Vaseline on, then fill the ice cream tub up to the rest. once it's dried, cut the plastic off and prise the silicone apart, giving a 2 part, if large and blocky mould. Take clay and make a sprue on your positive before casting if you plan on pouring into your mould. That's what i'm doing and it's worked for me, though I know ...

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    Heya, i'm along with you. i'd love a reply from the author, but I *believe*, and don't quote me on this, that the first mould, once cured, could have a thin coating of Vaseline or thinned petroleum jelly (thinned with meths or whatnot) and then the second layer of silicone could be placed over. Like, take an ice cream tub- one of the 2 litre ones, squidge your silicone into that and push your object into that up to the mould mark halfway. then, let it cure. put the Vaseline on, then fill the ice cream tub up to the rest. once it's dried, cut the plastic off and prise the silicone apart, giving a 2 part, if large and blocky mould. Take clay and make a sprue on your positive before casting if you plan on pouring into your mould. That's what i'm doing and it's worked for me, though I know very little about plastics. I'm sure someone will correct me, but I hope i've helped in some way.

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  • How to affix arrowheads to a shaft

    thanks for commenting :) I had thought about soldering methods too, but as far as I know that was a process used to churn out loads of heads for a cheaper price. There have been loads of heads found with a full tang too, but they were phased out as a design, at least in Europe throughout the 12th -14th century because every time the arrow hit something, the tang would be driven further up in the shaft, splitting the wood. This didn't matter in China and other countries like that because bamboo shafts were used, with the head glued in to the hollowed centre- a tang was really needed because heads like this would crack the fragile shaft if they fitted them in the manor I described above.

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  • How to affix arrowheads to a shaft

    Yeah, I get that. Just I was trying to go as in-depth as I could with it so that everyone knew everything that I did. Re-doing the heat treatment doesn't really take all that much extra time and, if you're gonna be using the arrows against targets stronger than straw or neoprene then it is worth doing- especially if you want them for the 'Big Shoots' that some re-enactment societies hold, where mannequins in armour are mocked up in a field and you want to pierce the plate. Heck, if you wanted to, just sand down the shaft and glue the head- no blowtorch necessary. But it all depends on how much time and money you're willing to invest, and what purpose you want them for.

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