author
2Instructables42,915Views7CommentsJoined July 23rd, 2015
I’m a 29 year old maker that has been working with electronics and robotics for over 10 years. I have a strong background in electronics and troubleshooting. I have a strong passion for building robots and will do so for the foreseeable future. I have served six years in the U.S. Air force, where I worked on the missile guidance systems and electronic subsystems of Intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBM’s). I also have a associates in electronics technology and I’m mostly self taught.

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  • The DocDoc commented on The DocDoc's instructable Raspberry Pi powered by batteries 11 months ago
    Raspberry Pi powered by batteries

    Yes you can easily add a LCD and a camera, However you may want to think of a larger Li-ion RC car battery 3000mAh or higher @ 7.2 or 11.1volts. You would not need to use a different DC-DC converter. LCD official http://www.mcmelectronics.com/product/RASPBERRY-P...Camera http://www.mcmelectronics.com/product/28-21440There is also a 5MP camera that is slightly older. You can also chose a different LCD, However this one is supported out of the box and has capacitive touch built in.

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  • The DocDoc commented on The DocDoc's instructable Raspberry Pi powered by batteries 1 year ago
    Raspberry Pi powered by batteries

    I chose the regulator as I know I'm getting a product with high quality parts made in America. This regulator also has built-in reverse-voltage protection, over-current protection, thermal shutdown (which typically activates at 165°C), and an under-voltage lockout that causes the regulator to turn off when the input voltage is below 2.5 V (typical). So there is no need to supply via USB on the Pi as the protection is built in. This will cause no harm to the Pi being powered though the I/O pins. Also the regulator you link cannot boost the voltage from the batteries if they drop below the output voltage. This means the regulator will stop providing power long before the batteries have fully discharged. Reducing on time.

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