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2Instructables33,555Views28CommentsJoined October 16th, 2015
Engineer by day, mad scientist by night.

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  • The Sam D commented on The Sam D's instructable Automatic Lights for Tool Chest2 months ago
    Automatic Lights for Tool Chest

    Hey Thanks for reading and the comment.I toyed with the idea of using a transformer and running it into a socket like you mention. The man reason I didn't do this was my tool chest like many others would require holes to be dripped in it to run the wire. I wanted to modify this as lightly as possible, so I elected for battery packs.Now, I wrote this Instructable about two years ago and I use my tool chest pretty frequently and I can now attest that the batteries in this configuration last just about two years.In fact, I replaced some while they still produced power because of how long they were installed and I didn't want them to start leaking. Thanks for reading!

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  • The Sam D commented on FamousMods's instructable LED Snowboard Kit5 months ago
    LED Snowboard Kit

    Love your project.Where did you find the weather proof barrel connectors (gland seal)? I've been looking for a good 5 pin weather proof connector for an LED project myself!

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  • The Sam D commented on The Sam D's instructable Build an in Ground Swimming Pool6 months ago
    Build an in Ground Swimming Pool

    Thanks for the kind words.Correct, past four feet we used 'double rebar' otherwise known as 6 inches on center. I concur, I don't know if it's a requirement everywhere but it is here in Florida also. Pictures not show it completely, some of the pictures are between steps. Rebar vendor came back second day to complete the rebar. Thanks for reading.

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  • The Sam D commented on Jigsawman's instructable Build a Pirate Ship Wreck8 months ago
    Build a Pirate Ship Wreck

    Fantastic. Really nice job, one of the best builds I've seen on here. Congrats on an awesome project and write up.

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  • The Sam D commented on The Sam D's instructable Build an in Ground Swimming Pool8 months ago
    Build an in Ground Swimming Pool

    Well someone is really all the craziness I wrote. :)Let me know when you dig for gold, I'll supply my PayPal info. ;)

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  • The Sam D commented on The Sam D's instructable Build an in Ground Swimming Pool8 months ago
    Build an in Ground Swimming Pool

    Thanks for reading and commenting! That's what Kids and grand-kids are for ;)

    Thanks for reading and commenting! Thanks what Kids and grandkids are for ;)

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  • The Sam D commented on The Sam D's instructable Build an in Ground Swimming Pool8 months ago
    Build an in Ground Swimming Pool

    Thanks for the nice remarks!

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  • The Sam D commented on The Sam D's instructable Build an in Ground Swimming Pool9 months ago
    Build an in Ground Swimming Pool

    Thanks for reading!

    Few things.As I'm sure you know, there are a lot of variations on concrete composition. A lot more than people realize, and those various composites have different additives resulting in different properties, cure rates and final strength. With that said, sounds like your supporting water curing is ideal i.e. spray your concrete down while it cures? Or was the water really meant to protect the sample in transit? Also an option could be, water is a excellent insulator so if you wanted to maintain an exact temp, using a water cooling/heating method would be excellent. Thanks for reading and thanks for the info!

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  • The Sam D made the instructable Build an in Ground Swimming Pool9 months ago
    Build an in Ground Swimming Pool

    Absolutely, like I said we have friends with Vinyl pools and they look wonderful! The glass tile we have is just down right impressive: although the tile alone is probably about the cost of a vinyl linear :|

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  • The Sam D commented on The Sam D's instructable Build an in Ground Swimming Pool9 months ago
    Build an in Ground Swimming Pool

    Yes, sorta lol.Concrete is porous and needs to have a sealer. Typical applications or a Pebble tec plaster (we used Pebble Tec), plaster, mud set tile (Cha ching) or others. So Yes, once the concrete is done, a finish must be applied. But no, you don't need to seal it before the final interior finish.

    Hey Thanks for reading! We sure did. Florida leads the country on homes with pools so we did on research on the types of pools and what people look for when buying a home. We don't plan on living here forever, so we baked in the future sales consideration.Also here in Florida, in the higher end neighborhoods you never see a vinyl pool. Also, most HOA's don't allow above ground pools in this area.In my neighborhood thanks to my drone flying ;) I can tell you maybe 70% of homes have pools, and of the people we know personally none of them have a Vinyl pool. So, we wanted to match the style of pool in the neighborhood for sure. We have friends with Vinyl pools and they are wonderful. But there is something a little bit more polished about a gunite pool with a nice finish. All pools are wo...

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    Hey Thanks for reading! We sure did. Florida leads the country on homes with pools so we did on research on the types of pools and what people look for when buying a home. We don't plan on living here forever, so we baked in the future sales consideration.Also here in Florida, in the higher end neighborhoods you never see a vinyl pool. Also, most HOA's don't allow above ground pools in this area.In my neighborhood thanks to my drone flying ;) I can tell you maybe 70% of homes have pools, and of the people we know personally none of them have a Vinyl pool. So, we wanted to match the style of pool in the neighborhood for sure. We have friends with Vinyl pools and they are wonderful. But there is something a little bit more polished about a gunite pool with a nice finish. All pools are wonderful and a lot of fun, for our desires gunite was the correct answer.Thanks for the comment!

    The instructable on swimming is pretty good, it should work ;)

    Thank you. Practical everwhere. We are 11 ft above sea level here, so we only dug down about 7 ft :)

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  • How To: DIY Home Automation with NodeMCU And Amazon Alexa

    Fantastic. I've been looking for a cheap solution for Alexa control of an outdoor light. The GE Zwave switches are 40 bucks minimum. Being able to use my existing Arduino stuff with this board will be great!Thanks! What's the range for the ESP module?

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  • The Sam D commented on Borya's instructable ESP8266 GMail sender1 year ago
    ESP8266 GMail sender

    I like it. I've had trouble in the past doing this exact thing, I hope your steps will help me!

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  • The Sam D commented on The Sam D's instructable Automatic Lights for Tool Chest1 year ago
    Automatic Lights for Tool Chest

    Possibly, I picked the limit switch due to it's compact layout and reliability. Between the drawers in most cases there is very little room. In my case I had about 11 mm (~0.4 inch). I didn't want to modify the drawer itself (drill a hole to mount this type of push button), so I created the bracket to mount on top.One could easily change out to a momentary push button. The key is for the button to be momentary, be small enough to fit inside the clearances and be able to firmly open the circuit with the drawer closed. I don't see the dimensions on this particular button, but I have a similar one on my desk and it's right in or above the 1/2 inch envelop.One thing I've also come across are momentary buttons are typically a little more expensive (repetitively speaking of course). They will...

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    Possibly, I picked the limit switch due to it's compact layout and reliability. Between the drawers in most cases there is very little room. In my case I had about 11 mm (~0.4 inch). I didn't want to modify the drawer itself (drill a hole to mount this type of push button), so I created the bracket to mount on top.One could easily change out to a momentary push button. The key is for the button to be momentary, be small enough to fit inside the clearances and be able to firmly open the circuit with the drawer closed. I don't see the dimensions on this particular button, but I have a similar one on my desk and it's right in or above the 1/2 inch envelop.One thing I've also come across are momentary buttons are typically a little more expensive (repetitively speaking of course). They will run you in many cases about $1 each (your link is $1.10 each) and the limit switch was about 50 cents each. Push button would have increased the cost by $5 without adding any additional value.The other thing I liked about the limit switch was the wire connectors. Buttons like you linked have leads you can solder too which is completely fine. BUT, I preferred the wire connectors so I could replace in-kind easily if a switch were to become damaged without having to solder things back together. Using a female wire connector makes for easy service if required. Since the switch (or button) is the moving part and most likely fail point, it's good practice to make future service considerations a priority. The limit switch and service considerations are certainly overkill, but when it's a cheaper option it just makes sense. Thanks for reading!

    I don't think so. Those Light up switches while "bright" are essentially a single LED inside a diffuser. Also, the only practical application I can see is an interference setup like I used. By that I mean, when the drawer is closed the contact of the back wall changes the circuit from closed to open. Since the only part of the setup with relative motion to the drawer is the back wall it is the ideal switching mechanism. From the perspective of the lights, the drawer isn't moving and the back wall does. If you mounted that button in the back of the drawer you would have 2 issues: 1) light to far from point of use and 2) the button itself is the light and to operate in my design the light source itself would be pointed away from the user i.e. pointed at the back wall. The LEDs...

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    I don't think so. Those Light up switches while "bright" are essentially a single LED inside a diffuser. Also, the only practical application I can see is an interference setup like I used. By that I mean, when the drawer is closed the contact of the back wall changes the circuit from closed to open. Since the only part of the setup with relative motion to the drawer is the back wall it is the ideal switching mechanism. From the perspective of the lights, the drawer isn't moving and the back wall does. If you mounted that button in the back of the drawer you would have 2 issues: 1) light to far from point of use and 2) the button itself is the light and to operate in my design the light source itself would be pointed away from the user i.e. pointed at the back wall. The LEDs I used have 3 LEDs per segment, and 6 segments were used in each drawer. This results in 18 LEDs in the drawer which is actually a good amount of light. It's beight enough to be useful without being blinding. The button you linked is a great button, not a good application here.

    Absolutely. I understand that there a lot of solutions to various problems.I wrote this to share a neat idea I came up with one late night searching my tool box for a socket. I know more light is better, and if everyone could they would install a lot of light in their garages. However, I understand that isn't a pragmatic approach. Often times people can't afford to tie up a ton of money in shop lights especially those out there that tend to me on a casual user side. If you work in a commercial shop this might seem silly, but for the other 99% of readers with a typical garage setup, this is a perfect cheap effective approach to adding light at point of use.All that said, when you install this in your tool box and show it to your buddies, your going to show it off. Some times projects li...

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    Absolutely. I understand that there a lot of solutions to various problems.I wrote this to share a neat idea I came up with one late night searching my tool box for a socket. I know more light is better, and if everyone could they would install a lot of light in their garages. However, I understand that isn't a pragmatic approach. Often times people can't afford to tie up a ton of money in shop lights especially those out there that tend to me on a casual user side. If you work in a commercial shop this might seem silly, but for the other 99% of readers with a typical garage setup, this is a perfect cheap effective approach to adding light at point of use.All that said, when you install this in your tool box and show it to your buddies, your going to show it off. Some times projects like this are just cool and that's plenty of reason to make it if you ask me.Thanks for reading!

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  • The Sam D followed ElectroFrank1 year ago
  • The Sam D commented on The Sam D's instructable Automatic Lights for Tool Chest1 year ago
    Automatic Lights for Tool Chest

    I'm an engineer, therefor I'm required to be a terrible speller lol.Fixed. Thanks for reading and catching that!

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  • The Sam D commented on The Sam D's instructable Automatic Lights for Tool Chest1 year ago
    Automatic Lights for Tool Chest

    No, but how about under cabinet lighting in the kitchen? Or extra lights for a truck bed? Or easy flexible lights for a tent? So many uses for these Led lights hooked to a low voltage supply or battery packs. Thanks for reading!

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  • The Sam D commented on jleslie48's instructable Portable rocket stove about $25 1 year ago
    Portable rocket stove about $25

    As an alternative, you could use like 4 - 6 inch ducting and bring your leaf blower. I have a buddy that does that, and shoots flames 10 feet into the air.

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  • The Sam D commented on The Sam D's instructable Automatic Lights for Tool Chest1 year ago
    Automatic Lights for Tool Chest

    Yep, your right. Thanks for pointing that out, I will correct. I didn't double check myself when writing it. You can't get both Voltage and extra mAh, one pays for the other.

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  • The Sam D commented on The Sam D's instructable Automatic Lights for Tool Chest1 year ago
    Automatic Lights for Tool Chest

    Of course I do. My work does have good lighting, however I do believe more light is always better. Also I know this is an issue for a lot of people who can't light their work area as effectively as they would like. A quick google search will yield a lot of people asking for a solution. And one that's automatic? Come on.....But as Marco so effectively stated below, because it's pretty cool for 30 bucks.

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  • The Sam D commented on The Sam D's instructable Automatic Lights for Tool Chest1 year ago
    Automatic Lights for Tool Chest

    Awesome, make it and post a picture!

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