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  • How to Mill Rough Lumber With No Jointer

    Experience, some of it good, most of it told me that the effort to make the sled was much more than could have been accomplished with judicious application of a hand plane. And talking with (unfortunately not working with) a few master cabinet makers.Your mileage may vary, of course.

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  • How to Mill Rough Lumber With No Jointer

    You can save money at the lumber yard or other vendor, but at the cost of doing the millwork yourself. How you feel about working in that sector of the lumber industry has a lot to do with the choice to do it, not to mention how you value your time. Most crafters, including myself, have a theoretical shop rate, and most of the ones I know generally don't make it (but not for lack of trying), including myself.This procedure generally will not take a cup or twist out of the board. Running a warped board through a planer, without taking some extraordinary measures (which also cost time and money), will yield a board with the same warp, only thinner. Jointing the first face, however you do it, is one of the things you are paying for when you buy S2S (and dry) lumber. On the other hand, this m…

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    You can save money at the lumber yard or other vendor, but at the cost of doing the millwork yourself. How you feel about working in that sector of the lumber industry has a lot to do with the choice to do it, not to mention how you value your time. Most crafters, including myself, have a theoretical shop rate, and most of the ones I know generally don't make it (but not for lack of trying), including myself.This procedure generally will not take a cup or twist out of the board. Running a warped board through a planer, without taking some extraordinary measures (which also cost time and money), will yield a board with the same warp, only thinner. Jointing the first face, however you do it, is one of the things you are paying for when you buy S2S (and dry) lumber. On the other hand, this might not matter to you for any number of reasons.Also, the conventional wisdom for jointing edges on the table saw is to ensure that the offcut is at least as wide throughout as the blade's kerf. On the other hand, saving that last 2/8 or 2/10 inch of very expensive lumber might be more important to you than the risks.

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  • Penguin Scroll Saw Puzzle

    About staining wood to get black: you've done the experiment and come to the right conclusion.I've done some research on ebonizing, and unless you like working with nasty solutions or want the streaky effect you can end up with, black acrylic spray lacquer is the way to go. You get blacker than real ebony, and your wallet will thank you. I recently priced some Macassar Ebony, and it goes for around US$265 per board foot.

    I love it. My daughter, who collects penguin things, may just get one of these, made on her scrollsaw, which still lives in my shop. [Gumby, if you see this, mum's the word, please]But I must comment on two things:Using a screwdriver to open cans should be discouraged, for a number of reasons, including damaging the screwdriver (maybe not so bad if you know how to repair them, I do, or you can return them to the vendor who sold them to you claiming warrantee issues. Be prepared for a fight there) and sending the business end through your fingers. Use something designed for that purpose.You mention using treated wood. I don't know what is used where you are, but here in the USA often treated wood involves the use of nasty chemicals (if they're not good for fungi and insects, they're not go…

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    I love it. My daughter, who collects penguin things, may just get one of these, made on her scrollsaw, which still lives in my shop. [Gumby, if you see this, mum's the word, please]But I must comment on two things:Using a screwdriver to open cans should be discouraged, for a number of reasons, including damaging the screwdriver (maybe not so bad if you know how to repair them, I do, or you can return them to the vendor who sold them to you claiming warrantee issues. Be prepared for a fight there) and sending the business end through your fingers. Use something designed for that purpose.You mention using treated wood. I don't know what is used where you are, but here in the USA often treated wood involves the use of nasty chemicals (if they're not good for fungi and insects, they're not good for you) which can be absorbed through the skin or the membranes of your nose, throat and lungs. Some of these have halflives of many years, which means the damage is cumulative and semi-permanent.I'm thinking I might use cabinet grade plywood, or maybe luan subflooring, or solid core poplar plywood (or some of that 1/2" S4S poplar that's been sitting around in my shop for a couple of years)

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  • I like the idea of an adjustable suction port that doubles as a sink for larger objects. I'm now aiming at making a squidbrush like this, but I don't know when it will float to the top of the to-do list.I will note that more flow is a heavier load than less flow, analogous to electric current. [the mathematics are the same, except for the fact that air is compressible and electrons are not, that I know of.] When you close off the flow the motor speeds up, allowing the flow slows it down.My largest shop vacuum cleaner is a 30gal ShopMate, built by ShopVac for Shopsmith. I found out when I replaced the motor [it got tired after 30 some years in service. For that matter, so did I :] that it is the same motor used in some whole house vacuum systems, and is designed for relatively low flow, h…

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    I like the idea of an adjustable suction port that doubles as a sink for larger objects. I'm now aiming at making a squidbrush like this, but I don't know when it will float to the top of the to-do list.I will note that more flow is a heavier load than less flow, analogous to electric current. [the mathematics are the same, except for the fact that air is compressible and electrons are not, that I know of.] When you close off the flow the motor speeds up, allowing the flow slows it down.My largest shop vacuum cleaner is a 30gal ShopMate, built by ShopVac for Shopsmith. I found out when I replaced the motor [it got tired after 30 some years in service. For that matter, so did I :] that it is the same motor used in some whole house vacuum systems, and is designed for relatively low flow, high speed operation. 100+ feet of ductwork plus 50 feet of actual hose and attachments offers more resistance than 8 feet of 2 1/2" dust hose.

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  • Great idea, and thanks to other commenters; I wouldn't have thought to use CA glue to stabilize and strengthen the threads.But if the 'clearance' hole drilled in the wood is smaller than the minor diameter of the screw, it's not a clearance hole at all. You actually don't want a clearance hole; you should aim at a 75% thread; that is only 75% of the internal and external threads are engaged. If the wood is very soft, go for 80% or 82%; likewise if it is very hard you can go down to 50% or so. Tables for what drill sizes to use for clearance and 50% and 75% thread holes are readily available.Anything higher than 82% risks the tap or the bolt binding in and/or splitting the wood.I make bottle stoppers and other objects held on the lathe with a machine screw chuck of onesort or another. Some…

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    Great idea, and thanks to other commenters; I wouldn't have thought to use CA glue to stabilize and strengthen the threads.But if the 'clearance' hole drilled in the wood is smaller than the minor diameter of the screw, it's not a clearance hole at all. You actually don't want a clearance hole; you should aim at a 75% thread; that is only 75% of the internal and external threads are engaged. If the wood is very soft, go for 80% or 82%; likewise if it is very hard you can go down to 50% or so. Tables for what drill sizes to use for clearance and 50% and 75% thread holes are readily available.Anything higher than 82% risks the tap or the bolt binding in and/or splitting the wood.I make bottle stoppers and other objects held on the lathe with a machine screw chuck of onesort or another. Some kits recommend pre-tapping the blank (and the purveyors of those kitswill happily sell you a tap the works with their chucks), or using threaded inserts (also sold bykit people. I have never had any trouble by using the screw on the chuck to cut it's own threadsin a properly sized (75%) hole.As we used to say in the '70s, Your Mileage May Vary.

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  • There's a difference among the oaks. White oak is great for projects like this, (and shows fantastic sidegrain patterns when quartersawn). It's used to make storage/ageing barrels forliquids such as wine, water, brandy and so on.Red oak, on the other hand is extremely porous, to the extent that in some circles it's known as'Holey Wood'. Even when apparently sealed, there's too much chance for bacteria and other nastiesto accumulate and grow, so it is not suitable for cutting boards and such.

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  • If you have a pair of smooth edges, such as you'd get from careful cutting of solid card stock, an ordinary butt joint will do. PVA, e.g. Elmer's white school glue works, yellow glue, e.g. Elmer's Carpenter's Wood Glue, or any of Titebond I, II, or III (I for indoor dry use, II for water resistance, III for water/immersion proofing)I have no experience with Gorilla Glue or CA glue in this sort of application. It seems to me that CA doesn't afford one enough open time and removing squeeze-out or making alignment adjustments can be problematic.Any of the above should produce a joint that is stronger than the cardboard that is joined. Remove or control squeeze-out by letting the glue set for 5-10 mins, then scraping with the flat side of a wood chisel or an unsharpened (i.e. no burr on the e…

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    If you have a pair of smooth edges, such as you'd get from careful cutting of solid card stock, an ordinary butt joint will do. PVA, e.g. Elmer's white school glue works, yellow glue, e.g. Elmer's Carpenter's Wood Glue, or any of Titebond I, II, or III (I for indoor dry use, II for water resistance, III for water/immersion proofing)I have no experience with Gorilla Glue or CA glue in this sort of application. It seems to me that CA doesn't afford one enough open time and removing squeeze-out or making alignment adjustments can be problematic.Any of the above should produce a joint that is stronger than the cardboard that is joined. Remove or control squeeze-out by letting the glue set for 5-10 mins, then scraping with the flat side of a wood chisel or an unsharpened (i.e. no burr on the edge) cabinet scraper. Single edge razor blades in a suitable holder work well here, too.If you are using corrugated cardboard, use wooden toothpicks or match sticks (take the heads off the matches) as dowels and glue as above. Again, the joint will be stronger than the cardboard.I first learned these techniques for a freshman engineering project: construct a bookstand such as an invalid might use in bed, capable of supporting a freshman physics and chemistry textbook at the same time, from paper and cardboard no thicker than 1/8". Glue and some forms of adhesive tape were acceptable.

    I forgot to mention: I have no pecuniary interest in Elmer's or Titebond products, other than as a very satisfied user.

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  • Almost all of my jaw sets for my nova chucks have a dovetail profile for expansion gripping. Theywill hold with a depth of as little as 1/8"; I usually go no deeper than 3/16", unless I see someflaw in the wood that will cause it to split out under pressure. In any case, make sure there'ssufficient wood around the edge of the dovetail.Or: for bowls like this, I've made the bottom thicker and screwed a faceplate to it. Drill outthe screwholes and insert decorative plugs. These can be either sawn off and sanded flush,or left a little bit proud, giving the bowl some lift on its feet.Be safe while sanding, Do not let your abrasives wrap around your hand or fingers. Ensure thatthere's sufficient thickness by folding (some insist on folding in thirds, I find that it depends onthe abra…

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    Almost all of my jaw sets for my nova chucks have a dovetail profile for expansion gripping. Theywill hold with a depth of as little as 1/8"; I usually go no deeper than 3/16", unless I see someflaw in the wood that will cause it to split out under pressure. In any case, make sure there'ssufficient wood around the edge of the dovetail.Or: for bowls like this, I've made the bottom thicker and screwed a faceplate to it. Drill outthe screwholes and insert decorative plugs. These can be either sawn off and sanded flush,or left a little bit proud, giving the bowl some lift on its feet.Be safe while sanding, Do not let your abrasives wrap around your hand or fingers. Ensure thatthere's sufficient thickness by folding (some insist on folding in thirds, I find that it depends onthe abrasive and work) to keep built up heat from burning you. Always sand in the downward quadrant,so that your fingers won't get jammed and the abrasive won't get thrown back at you. Watch outfor the corners of your fold; they can catch as badly as a mishandled gouge or chisel.Using a disk sander in the manner shown to flatten the rings is a recipe for disaster (or at least veryshort fingernails). Find some other way to do it that keeps your hands away from the abrasive.If you don't like the idea of sticking your hand deep inside a spinning bowl (and you shouldn't) or thebowl is of a hollow design, glue up a few rings at a time, finish the insides while the bowl is stillshallow enough for comfort.

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  • And thanks for the details of the hanging drawers. I have an old kitchen table that is of sentimental value to my family, but the drawer guides and slides were made of pine or fir. Seventy five years of use has worn those down to nothing. I'm going to rebuild them out of some rock maple.

    I like it. It is similar to several I've made, none with a door for a tabletop, yet. For a couple of them, since I had only cheap screws available, I opted for 1/2" or 3/8" hardware, which I had a lot of (until I built tables and bed frames with them).Adding 'kickstops' to the backs of the drawers might be desirable. If your drawers get loaded like mine, you do not want them coming down on your foot ...

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  • Fascinating. Have you considered offering this in kit form? In one of the comments you mention using the right sort of paint for the non-brass option. What sort of paint would that be?

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  • Very clever, I'm considering retrofitting a bench this way.I would make one suggestion: when drilling pilot holes in pine and other soft materials, use a bit that will yield a 75% thread, that is only the outer 75% of the threads engage in the material. In hardwoods, such as maple, oak or walnut, or other hard materials use a 50% thread. I may be misinterpreting the diagram, but it looks like it calls for a 100% thread.Tables for various kinds of holes and screws are readily available. If you don't have the exact size bit, select one between the 75% and 50% threads.Depending on the screws and material, undersizing the hole risks a jammed screw, the slot stripping out, or the head twisting off. Just last night I discovered that the person who fastened my kitchen table top to its base under…

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    Very clever, I'm considering retrofitting a bench this way.I would make one suggestion: when drilling pilot holes in pine and other soft materials, use a bit that will yield a 75% thread, that is only the outer 75% of the threads engage in the material. In hardwoods, such as maple, oak or walnut, or other hard materials use a 50% thread. I may be misinterpreting the diagram, but it looks like it calls for a 100% thread.Tables for various kinds of holes and screws are readily available. If you don't have the exact size bit, select one between the 75% and 50% threads.Depending on the screws and material, undersizing the hole risks a jammed screw, the slot stripping out, or the head twisting off. Just last night I discovered that the person who fastened my kitchen table top to its base undersized the pilot holes. Out of six #12 wood screws, I had two without heads, and the others had stripped out and unusable Phillips slots. Fortunately, since this was an emergency, the extractors I had worked flawlessly.P.S. Don't use cheap screws. The cost savings aren't worth the aggravation when one or more fails.

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  • I have done this, and similar things. But perhaps I misunderstand: If the hole to be threaded is drilled just smaller than the minor diameter of the threads, it isn't a clearance hole. You want a hole sized to produce a 50% thread in hard materials, and a 75% thread in soft materials. Tables for easy fit clearance, tight fit clearance, and tap holes are readily available for various standard thread sizes. Practically speaking, in wood anything between 50% and 75% would work. Aim for the larger hole if you intend to use glue on the threads, especially if the selected glue expands as it cures.Whenever possible, use a drill press, or a lathe as a horizontal boring machine. You turn the spindle by hand; the machinery keeps it all aligned properly. You may have to give the forward feed a littl…

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    I have done this, and similar things. But perhaps I misunderstand: If the hole to be threaded is drilled just smaller than the minor diameter of the threads, it isn't a clearance hole. You want a hole sized to produce a 50% thread in hard materials, and a 75% thread in soft materials. Tables for easy fit clearance, tight fit clearance, and tap holes are readily available for various standard thread sizes. Practically speaking, in wood anything between 50% and 75% would work. Aim for the larger hole if you intend to use glue on the threads, especially if the selected glue expands as it cures.Whenever possible, use a drill press, or a lathe as a horizontal boring machine. You turn the spindle by hand; the machinery keeps it all aligned properly. You may have to give the forward feed a little assist if the threads are not sufficient to feed the work by themselves. It wouldn't be a bad idea to use those machines to aid in grinding threads off leaving a smooth shank.

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  • Cool. So with the addition of heat, you're causing the zinc and copper to dissolve into each other creating brass. I wonder how this process would work with current US coins. Since 1982 with the exception of 2009 the one cent piece (penny) has been copper plated zinc. Since 1965 dimes, quarters, halves and large format dollars have been 'sandwiches': the obverse and reverse sides are layers of cupronickel (75% copper, 25% nickel, traces of manganese) on a pure copper core, which is visible on the edge of the coins. Nickels have been pure cupronickel since 1946. I don't know about more recent dollar coins such as the Susan B. Anthony and Sacajawea. Newer dollars seem to have a shiny or matte yellow surface.Unfortunately, I will not be able to perform the experiments in the near future.

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  • The soviets were good at making virtues out of necessities. On the other hand, the americans benefited greatly from spinoffs of the 0g pen research, in more ways than just the consumer level ballpoint pen that wrote upside down.For that matter, that megabuck made it's way into the pockets of more than a few regular hard-working employees.In a previous life, I ran a consulting company. SDI money from the feds to my clients enabled that company to survive.Sorry, I sorta got on a soapbox. I'll stop now. These 10 are indeed clever uses for ordinary pencils.

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  • The vast majority so far has been wood: hardwoods and softwoods, seasoned or green. I did some experiments on tagua nuts (vegetable ivory), and a chunk of beef bone I filched from my ex's dog.I have a banksia pod that was given to me a long time ago. Every so often I pick it up, shake my head, and put it down again. It's time will come, though. 'Real Soon Now' I will start some experiments with acrylic blanks, and I'm making some contacts with suppliers of fordite.

    I'm thinking I will try this at some, but as I have a large supply of quarter-usletter paper, I will try making it flat in a press. Yes, the original cellulose has been broken, but like particleboard, chipboard, flakeboard and other manufactured materials, the product will be mostly glue. Since my intention is to make turning stock, I will probably use a water resistant glue, so the final object can be washed, if not immersed.

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  • sgbotsford has anticipated my questions. I've found that SiC wet or dry abrasive papers on glass, MDF or HDF works fine; once the sheet is wet it doesn't move around, unless one is too exuberant and lifts an edge. This technique also works for fettling planes, getting a wickedsharp edge on various tools (plane blades, chisels and such) and flattening oil and water stones.It's also less messy, and I can use tools and materials I already have, rather than invest in new stuff, which has to be stored and kept track of ...I haven't done flame polishing on wine bottles and such; just Pyrex, Kimax and random flint glass. It would be nice to know if there are any additional risks to that

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  • A really nice idea, beautifully done. A question: would a clear spray lacquer or similar solve the problem of spot tarnishing from fingerprints? If you considered it but decided against it, what were the reasons?

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  • Some very good ideas here. I might 'steal' the blast shield/dust collector and pegboard ones next time I need a sacrificial top for my RAS.Pegboard is pretty good in terms of consistency of the centers of the holes for linear work. although for really precise work I'd worry about wear in the holes and consistency of the pegs.For angles, a lot depends on the kind of work you do. Sometimes I make up segmented rings for making into bowls. For example, 9 segments times 1/2 degree off is 4 1/2 degrees, which is more than enough to keep the ring from closing.

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  • This is a fine idea; photographers have been filtering their lights since they became available. But:This is a fire hazard. Compact Fluorescents run cooler than incandescents, but still generate enough heat to be uncomfortable to touch (45-50degrees C) and that will, given enough time, ignite the towel/filter.Do not try this with halogen lamps, even with infrared absorbing glass.

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