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2Instructables92,695Views51CommentsHackensack NJ
Corporate America escapee now doing more meaningful things like building tiny houses and helping others build them as well. Beyond that, I also coach people on plotting their own escape from the drudgery of 9-5 and commuting. Reach out and say hi. I love to hear from people and what their dreams are for the next act in their lives. Let me be your sherpa on that path... - @tinyindustrial on Instagram...please follow me - tinyindustrial - Etsy Store (copper and quirky accent pieces) - www.con…

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Outdoor Structures
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  • Build a Custom Camper Gypsy Wagon!

    Thanks! Thanks for getting the book. Please also check out my video content on the same topic on Youtube: www.youtube.com/c/tinyindustrialThe reason for the 3 sheets of aluminum is simply because that is what I have access to around here. I would prefer to use a single sheet to cover the whole roof, but have yet to find a supplier around here that sells that (also harder to transport to where I'm building this if it were available). That's the main reason(s). No engineering reason for doing so...just practical considerations. - Chris

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  • Build a Custom Camper Gypsy Wagon!

    Hi there. The sheet of aluminum are 4'x8' sheets. Roof on this one was the 8' of the trailer and the 1' overhang on the back. I bought 3 sheets of the aluminum and started at the back. Reason is that the next sheet overlaps ON TOP of the prior sheet. That is because of direction of travel and and not pushing wind and rain into the seam between the sheets. Sine you are using 3 sheets to cover 9' of roof, it leaves you with 3' of extra material. There are two overlaps between the 3 sheets, so each overlap should be roughly 1.5'. Make sense? That's certainly overkill but it saves you from having to cut up one of the sheets. I usually apply silicone liberally into the overlap section and then when the sheets are screwed down in place (into the 2x4 roofing beams), it forms a nice tight seal. H…

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    Hi there. The sheet of aluminum are 4'x8' sheets. Roof on this one was the 8' of the trailer and the 1' overhang on the back. I bought 3 sheets of the aluminum and started at the back. Reason is that the next sheet overlaps ON TOP of the prior sheet. That is because of direction of travel and and not pushing wind and rain into the seam between the sheets. Sine you are using 3 sheets to cover 9' of roof, it leaves you with 3' of extra material. There are two overlaps between the 3 sheets, so each overlap should be roughly 1.5'. Make sense? That's certainly overkill but it saves you from having to cut up one of the sheets. I usually apply silicone liberally into the overlap section and then when the sheets are screwed down in place (into the 2x4 roofing beams), it forms a nice tight seal. Haven't had any problems with this method. If instead you had a 10' trailer, the process is the same. You are covering 10' of trailer plus a foot of overhang. That's 11' total. 3 sheets of aluminum. You are now left with one extra foot...two seams...=6" per seam. 6" is still plenty sufficient to create a good seal. It's only if you go to a 12' trailer that you would need the one additional sheet of aluminum. I think you get the idea. Reach out if you have any more questions.

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  • Hi Melissa. Yes, you could add a queen mattress, but for that I would recommend that you go with a longer trailer. The intractable use an 8' trailer. Go with at least a 10' to make room for the larger bed. Tiny Industrial, my company, builds a 10' version with a full size mattress. You can see what that looks like at www.tinyindustrial.com. If you want be really comfortable with two people check out the 'Oculus North'

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  • Total cost is around $5000-$6000 based on what you put in there. You can make it more expensive or less. Using repurposed materials can help. Cutting things like the AC out can help you too.

    Small electric is plenty sufficient for a space this small.

    Thanks! I'm doing a video tutorial at the moment of another gypsy wagon build that will be available via my website in late 2018.

    If you check out www.tinyindustrial.com, you will see a build that I did exactly like the way you are describing. I called it 'Lil Wing'.

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  • I'm glad to hear that. I'm actually working on a full video tutorial on how to build one of these as an upgrade to what I put on Instructables. That will be available via www.tinyindustrial.com in the Fall of 2018.

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  • That looks great! Thanks for sharing.

    They are designed to be hung on the wall. Either with a screw or two through he board or with some hooks on the back. Thanks!

    Thanks. Yup, lots of character and soul in those old boards. I keep making more and selling them on Etsy (Store 'Tiny Industrial')

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  • Go for it! It's a fun project and the result is a pretty cool conversation piece.

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    • Upcycled Skateboard Lamp From a Used Deck
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      2 comments
  • Water is self-contained on the inside. There is a 2 gallon tank I installed. You could go much bigger if needed. The sink has a pump faucet and drains to the outside. You could capture that if need be. In regard to power, 110 come into the wagon via a simply connector and the use of an extension cord. The cord plug into the outside and routes into the camper via this: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009ANV81SIt's a pretty simple set up. When not connected to electricity the lights work off of battery. That also powers USB and 12 volt plug. Hope that answers your questions.

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  • Yes, there is a battery. Solar would only really be needed if you were to take it off grid for more than a few days. I've had no need to do that but, subsequent owners may want to go that route of putting in a solar system.

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    • Build a Custom Camper Gypsy Wagon!
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      80 comments
  • Thanks. A small space heater is completely sufficient to heat this. A wood stove...even a small one...would likely be overkill in this size space. If you intend to go fully off grid though, it's likely your best option though. One of those wall mounted sailboat ones...stainless.

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  • Nice idea on the longer 2x4s. Could have extended at least another foot and still had proper overlap in the roofing material. As I responded back to someone else, the ramp was not really usable anymore once the AC went in the back wall. Without the AC unit back there, it would be a good idea to do as you suggest.

    Completely agree with you. I would have loved to keep the ramp but, I opted to put in the AC unit, so the ramp can't really fold up properly anymore in the back because the AC will get in the way.

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  • It was an honor to have you visit and thanks for the kind words. I'm glad that you got to see it in person. Nice to hear that I might be 'inspiring' people to move forward with their own plans to build one of these for themselves...

    This is a great entry level tiny house project! You will learn so much in building one of these. It's a pretty low level of commitment as well and if/when you do make mistakes, they won't be as costly or irreversible as they might be with a much bigger structure. Just know that there is a lot of support out there and the when you run into a problem there are folks like myself that are happy to lend assistance. I don't have a construction background...I would consider myself 'handy' but, it's even surprising to me that I was able to make something like this... Thanks for your comment.

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  • A basic shell starts at $5900. That includes a - quality trailer (like the one I used...5x8')- four framed and closed walls- a roof- a cutout for the doorThis provides starting point for what you want this to be. Create your own vision. Other things can be added on by me at your request but, they will naturally add to the overall cost. Doing what you suggest with the bed would likely not work unless you are a really small person. The bed can however be folded up though (front lifted to sit vertically) and you can create a seating area in it's place that is much larger than the live edge seating area I have in the build you see above. You could also simply build on a slightly larger trailer for more space (ie. 5x10')

    They really make things sturdy and prevent bad things from happening on the highway.

    Thank you for posting! I appreciate all the sharing of this taking place.

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  • Thanks for the comment! I weighed every component that went into it on my scale. I did that since I didn't want to exceed or even get close to the 3000lbs rating on the trailer. Final weight came in at around 1750lbs.

    Side walls are 1.5" of insulation. Front and back are a bit thinner. Reality is that the space is so small that it's very easy to heat and keep warm with a minimum of effort. Thickening the walls to accommodate more/thicker insulation didn't seem like a good path to go down. I think that the 1.5 foam boards are R7's.

    Fly me out to Australia and I'll build you one :)

    I didn't really feel like that crescent piece was necessary in the back. In one of the steps you see the hurricane ties that I used throughout the ceiling. Those are both in the front and in the back. Most of the force is on the front. Roofing and ceiling structure is very solid.

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  • It tows well. Had it up to 70MPH on the highway with no problems, shimmy, or sway. It's built sturdy and essentially hurricane hurricane ready. Thanks!

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