author2
100CommentsNorthern Alberta, CanadaJoined May 1st, 2012
Mad Scientist with interest in anything that bleeps, sparks, whirls, melts, or does something it was never intended to do.

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100+ Comments Earned a bronze medal
  • Trike Lover followed ElectroSmash7 months ago
      • Raspberry Pi Zero Guitar Pedal
      • Arduino UNO Guitar Pedal - Open Hardware.
      • 1Wamp  Guitar Amplifier  - Open Hardware
  • Trike Lover commented on RudyD1's instructable Garage Door Opener Using a Raspberry Pi8 months ago
    Garage Door Opener Using a Raspberry Pi

    I've been looking into this also, mainly because I have a new-in-the-box Raspberry Pi looking for employment. With respect to the door opening and closing, and direction, could you use a magnetic or optical sensor with 2 trigger points on some part of the rotating mechanism (One might have two or more reflective strips or magnets, while the other would have only one). This could give you direction of travel, speed, and if you knew how many turns were required from that part for the door to be fully open or fully closed, an indication of that state also. This is much more lo-tech than a camera, but might be a reliable alternative. (Where I live, some cameras tend to have issues in cold weather). The indication of direction is definite - which marker passes the sensor first - and likewise...

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    I've been looking into this also, mainly because I have a new-in-the-box Raspberry Pi looking for employment. With respect to the door opening and closing, and direction, could you use a magnetic or optical sensor with 2 trigger points on some part of the rotating mechanism (One might have two or more reflective strips or magnets, while the other would have only one). This could give you direction of travel, speed, and if you knew how many turns were required from that part for the door to be fully open or fully closed, an indication of that state also. This is much more lo-tech than a camera, but might be a reliable alternative. (Where I live, some cameras tend to have issues in cold weather). The indication of direction is definite - which marker passes the sensor first - and likewise measurement of RPM is simple, as is the overall revolution count. Just "thinking out loud" at this point. Good luck with your build.

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  • Trike Lover followed RudyD18 months ago
      • Garage Door Opener Using a Raspberry Pi
      • Use Homie Firmware to Drive Sonoff Switch Module (ESP8266 Based)
      • Building Homie Devices for IoT or Home Automation
  • $1 DIY Conductive Ink and Paint From Fire! (non Toxic, Homemade, Cheap)

    How concentrated would the Sodium Hydroxide have to be to dissolve the glass or silica gel, and how hot? Would it be necessary (or advisable) to do this reaction in a fume hood, or at least somewhere with very good ventilation? Also, would any special protection be needed, over and above saftey glasses and gloves resistant to hot Sodium Hydroxide? To activate the water glass solution, would you bubble gaseous CO2 through the mixture, or could Dry Ice be used in some way? Just curious, since I'm not an expert in chemistry.

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  • Trike Lover commented on rsmaudsley's instructable Homemade Thumbscrew2 years ago
    Homemade Thumbscrew

    A couple of thoughts that may add to your very helpful Instructable. #1, (if using a carriage bolt as in the pictures) is to run the wingnut up the length of the bolt from its finished end, and with a file or Dremel tool round off the squared section of the bolt, just below its head. Mix up a small amount of JB Weld or Plastic Steel epoxy - the putty kind works best. Run the nut up as far as it will go, with the wingnut wings up, then use the JB Weld to fill in the area between the wings of the nut and the now-rounded section of the bolt. This gives a larger, smooth gripping area, and no need to re-form cut threads. #2 is to cut off the bolt head and run the wingnut up the bolt from the finished end. To increase the gripping surface, get a couple of large fender washers, tape off the ...

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    A couple of thoughts that may add to your very helpful Instructable. #1, (if using a carriage bolt as in the pictures) is to run the wingnut up the length of the bolt from its finished end, and with a file or Dremel tool round off the squared section of the bolt, just below its head. Mix up a small amount of JB Weld or Plastic Steel epoxy - the putty kind works best. Run the nut up as far as it will go, with the wingnut wings up, then use the JB Weld to fill in the area between the wings of the nut and the now-rounded section of the bolt. This gives a larger, smooth gripping area, and no need to re-form cut threads. #2 is to cut off the bolt head and run the wingnut up the bolt from the finished end. To increase the gripping surface, get a couple of large fender washers, tape off the hole on the outside of each, and then sandwich the wings of the wingnut and the bolt shaft between the two, again using JB Weld or similar epoxy to fill the space between the two washers as well as anchoring them to the the wingnut and the bolt shaft. "Permanent" Loctite is put on the threads between the wingnut and bolt threads first, and a small length of the bolt is left sticking up between the wings.Then file flats on the bolt so that the fender washers lie on a flat surface across the bolt and wingnut wings. This adds a gripping surface 1 inch (2.5 cm) or more. If your fingers have a touch of arthritis, this helps quite a bit. I have also seen welders extend the wings of a wingnut by slicing a large washer in half using a cutting disc in an angle grinder, then welding the two half circles, round side up, to either side of a small wingnut. That is then put on the bolt as in this Instructable. This greatly increases the gripping area. The same method could probably be used with epoxy putty; the pieces would need to be clamped together while everything sets.

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  • How to Talk to Someone Using Ham Radio

    Your information is correct for the United States' licensing requirements and classes at those times. The license classes and exam requirements differed considerably when I received my first license, and have changed at different times and in different ways than those in the United States in the intervening years. When I was first licensed, there were only two classes of license in Canada, both requiring CW. A third, VHF-only class was added later, but it was a highly technical examination with no CW. My information was not "false", but it was different, as I was licensed in another country with rules that did not mirror those in the United States. I think you will find that even now, both exams and licensing are different in our two countries. Canadian regulations and exams ...

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    Your information is correct for the United States' licensing requirements and classes at those times. The license classes and exam requirements differed considerably when I received my first license, and have changed at different times and in different ways than those in the United States in the intervening years. When I was first licensed, there were only two classes of license in Canada, both requiring CW. A third, VHF-only class was added later, but it was a highly technical examination with no CW. My information was not "false", but it was different, as I was licensed in another country with rules that did not mirror those in the United States. I think you will find that even now, both exams and licensing are different in our two countries. Canadian regulations and exams have changed at least 3 times since I received my license, and the examination is now much easier and is multiple-choice. Exams are now administered by Amateurs who are "Designated Examiners" rather than by the Department of Communications. With greatest respect, the information I gave was neither false nor mistaken for the time of which I spoke. Certainly they have changed a great deal in the intervening 41 years, but exams and rules in the U.S. and Canada are still not mirror images. 73, VE6FD.

    Your information is correct for the United States' licensing requirements and classes at those times. The license classes and exam requirements differed considerably when I received my first license, and have changed at different times and in different ways than those in the United States in the intervening years. When I was first licensed, there were only two classes of license in Canada, both requiring CW. A third, VHF-only class was added later, but it was a highly technical examination with no CW. My information was not "false", but it was different, as I was licensed in another country with rules that did not mirror those in the United States. I think you will find that even now, both exams and licensing are different in our two countries. Canadian regulations and exams ...

    see more »

    Your information is correct for the United States' licensing requirements and classes at those times. The license classes and exam requirements differed considerably when I received my first license, and have changed at different times and in different ways than those in the United States in the intervening years. When I was first licensed, there were only two classes of license in Canada, both requiring CW. A third, VHF-only class was added later, but it was a highly technical examination with no CW. My information was not "false", but it was different, as I was licensed in another country with rules that did not mirror those in the United States. I think you will find that even now, both exams and licensing are different in our two countries. Canadian regulations and exams have changed at least 3 times since I received my license, and the examination is now much easier and is multiple-choice. Exams are now administered by experienced Amateurs who are "Designated Examiners" rather than by the Department of Communications. With greatest respect, the information I gave was neither false nor mistaken for the time of which I spoke. Certainly they have changed a great deal in the intervening 41 years, but exams and rules in the U.S. and Canada are still not mirror images. 73, VE6FD.

    Your information is correct for the United States' licensing requirements and classes at those times. The license classes and exam requirements differed considerably when I received my first license, and have changed at different times and in different ways than those in the United States in the intervening years. When I was first licensed, there were only two classes of license in Canada, both requiring CW. A third, VHF-only class was added later, but it was ahighly technical examination with no CW. My information was not "false", but it was different, as I was licensed in another country with rules that did not mirror those in the United States. I think you will find that even now, both exams and licensing are different in our two countries. Canadian regulations and exams ha...

    see more »

    Your information is correct for the United States' licensing requirements and classes at those times. The license classes and exam requirements differed considerably when I received my first license, and have changed at different times and in different ways than those in the United States in the intervening years. When I was first licensed, there were only two classes of license in Canada, both requiring CW. A third, VHF-only class was added later, but it was ahighly technical examination with no CW. My information was not "false", but it was different, as I was licensed in another country with rules that did not mirror those in the United States. I think you will find that even now, both exams and licensing are different in our two countries. Canadian regulations and exams have changed at least 3 times since I received my license, and the examination is now much easier and is multiple-choice. Exams are now administered by experienced Amateurs who are "Designated Examiners" rather than by the Department of Communications.With greatest respect, the information I gave was neither false nor mistaken for the time of which I spoke. Certainly they have changed a great deal in the intervening 41 years, but exams and rules in the U.S. and Canada are still not mirror images. 73, VE6FD.

    Your information is correct for the United States' licensing requirements and classes differed considerably when I received my first license, and have changed at different times and in different ways than those in the United States in the intervening years. My information was not "false", but it was different, as I was licensed in another country with rules that did not mirror those in the United States. I think you will find that even now, both exams and licensing are different in our two countries. With greatest respect, the information I gave was neither false nor mistaken. Certainly the requirements have changed a great deal in the intervening 41 years, but rules in the U.S. and Canada are still not mirror images. 73, VE6FD.

    View Instructable »
  • Trike Lover followed The King of Random2 years ago