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  • TunerGeek made the instructable Electrolysis Bucket2 years ago
    Electrolysis Bucket

    I made this with a 5-gallon paint bucket, and spent some time today cleaning it after considerable use. I wire-brushed (on my bench grinder) the sacrificial rebar - after letting the buildup dry out - and replaced my five-piece 12-gauge bare copper rebar connecting wire with a one-piece, 14-gauge one, attached by hose clamps. I also use a piece of 1x3 pine to suspend my electrolizing parts in the water/washing soda solution, with eyehooks. The 1x3 is fitted with a length of 6-gauge copper I had left over from a plumbing project (ground wire to jump the water meter, per code) as a bus... I connect the negative lead from the battery charger to it, and one to five 16-gauge jumpers to the submerged part(s) from it. The battery charger line is *not* connected in my supplied photo, but do not...

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    I made this with a 5-gallon paint bucket, and spent some time today cleaning it after considerable use. I wire-brushed (on my bench grinder) the sacrificial rebar - after letting the buildup dry out - and replaced my five-piece 12-gauge bare copper rebar connecting wire with a one-piece, 14-gauge one, attached by hose clamps. I also use a piece of 1x3 pine to suspend my electrolizing parts in the water/washing soda solution, with eyehooks. The 1x3 is fitted with a length of 6-gauge copper I had left over from a plumbing project (ground wire to jump the water meter, per code) as a bus... I connect the negative lead from the battery charger to it, and one to five 16-gauge jumpers to the submerged part(s) from it. The battery charger line is *not* connected in my supplied photo, but do note the bends in the 14-gauge connector, which is held in place by hose clamps (which simplifies disassembly for cleaning the sacrificial rebar.) I built mine from this particular instructable, and plan - soon - to expand upon it to use a plastic 55-gallon barrel I recently purchased at an auction for a buck or two...

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  • Electrolysis for Rust Removal – Coffee Container

    I made this with a 5-gallon paint bucket, and spent some time today cleaning it after considerable use. I wire-brushed the sacrificial rebar - after letting the buildup dry out - and replaced my five-piece 12-gauge bare copper rebar connecting wire with a one-piece, 14-gauge one, attached by hose clamps. I also use a piece of 1x3 pine to suspend my electrolizing parts in the water/washing soda solution, with eyehooks. The 1x3 is fitted with a length of 6-gauge copper I had left over from a plumbing project (ground wire to jump the water meter, per code) as a bus... I connect the negative lead from the battery charger to it, and one to five 16-gauge jumpers to the submerged part(s) from it. The battery charger line is *not* connected in my supplied photo, but do note the bends in the 14-...

    see more »

    I made this with a 5-gallon paint bucket, and spent some time today cleaning it after considerable use. I wire-brushed the sacrificial rebar - after letting the buildup dry out - and replaced my five-piece 12-gauge bare copper rebar connecting wire with a one-piece, 14-gauge one, attached by hose clamps. I also use a piece of 1x3 pine to suspend my electrolizing parts in the water/washing soda solution, with eyehooks. The 1x3 is fitted with a length of 6-gauge copper I had left over from a plumbing project (ground wire to jump the water meter, per code) as a bus... I connect the negative lead from the battery charger to it, and one to five 16-gauge jumpers to the submerged part(s) from it. The battery charger line is *not* connected in my supplied photo, but do note the bends in the 14-gauge connector, which is held in place by hose clamps (which simplifies disassembly for cleaning the sacrificial rebar.)

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  • TunerGeek commented on mdheath's instructable Concrete and Wood Slab Table2 years ago
    Concrete and Wood Slab Table

    ?

    Maybe use go-bars to hold the (tabletop side of the) plank tight against the form. And, as others have mentioned, wood expansion and contraction could become an issue if you don't have absolutely consistent humidity, but I'd think that thorough sealing of the plank prior to pouring the concrete should help immensely. Furthermore... I once experimented with mixing Portland cement with vermiculite and/or perlite for a far less weighty end product, but I have NO idea what this does to the strength of the resulting "concrete".

    Now I've been thinking... My GF and I need kitchen counter space... I'll check if the book is in the library, otherwise probably will have to buy it... Thank you Bruce! Paul

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  • TunerGeek commented on knife141's instructable Resurrecting vintage clocks2 years ago
    Resurrecting vintage clocks

    It's not "popular to trash WD40" amongst most people that I know, nor "on the Internet". My statement is based on much personal experience in many different applications. The only thing that I've continuously found it useful for is removing sticky label gum from new dishes or other non-porous surfaces. Even then, it's followed by soap and water to remove the oily residue. I can't argue with your ten-years-no-problems claim, but I will firmly stand by my imperative to never recommend WD40 for much anything, let alone a clock movement.

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  • TunerGeek commented on knife141's instructable Resurrecting vintage clocks2 years ago
    Resurrecting vintage clocks

    WD40 doesn't fix anything, particularly in a clock. Never, never, ever, ever use WD40 for ANYTHING, much less a delicate thing like a clock movement. End. Of. Story.

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