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Wild-Bill

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  • Wild-Bill commented on smogdog's instructable A Maker's Lunch Box
    A Maker's Lunch Box

    I loved your video and it put a big smile on my face.

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  • Add a Jet Engine to Your Project (SAFELY)

    Insane but very funny. Two Thumbs Up

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  • DIY Non Contact IR Thermometer V1.0

    I really like your project and I think it is timely and it has given me a solution to a project I have been thinking about. You get a big thumbs up from me.

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  • 5 Cutting Board Mistakes to Avoid

    The Instructable had a link to Gorilla glue but he wasn't using Gorilla Glue, but Gorilla Glue works very well for cutting boards but you might have to moisten the gluing surface. I go not like using the stuff but you better wear gloves when you use it and keep it off anything you don't want stuck down. It is messy stuff. The places I like to use Gorilla Glue is when what I am gluing is subject to the weather and I cannot easily see the glue joint so I don't need to clean it up. I prefer something like Titebond II or III (even yellow carpenters glue should do a good job) and I like to seal my boards with bees' wax. I thought it was a great Instructable.

    I use a lot of different glues for different purposes. For example I used Gorilla Glue to reinforce the bottom of an outside stair stringer made from pressure treated would and it sits on a concrete slab. I will never have to worry about it. I used the Titebond II on a half lapped top railing on the porch to which that stair was attached. It am going to make a canoe paddle for my son in law using this glue. Titebond II is more expensive then my glue of choice. When it comes to wood gluing I use a lots of glue call Yellow Glue or Carpenter's Glue. I use this in finishing carpentry and furniture making. It may be yellow but you will never see the glue line. I buy this glue in four litre jugs. It is tougher than the wood that is being glued but I wouldn't use it in boat building. I have used…

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    I use a lot of different glues for different purposes. For example I used Gorilla Glue to reinforce the bottom of an outside stair stringer made from pressure treated would and it sits on a concrete slab. I will never have to worry about it. I used the Titebond II on a half lapped top railing on the porch to which that stair was attached. It am going to make a canoe paddle for my son in law using this glue. Titebond II is more expensive then my glue of choice. When it comes to wood gluing I use a lots of glue call Yellow Glue or Carpenter's Glue. I use this in finishing carpentry and furniture making. It may be yellow but you will never see the glue line. I buy this glue in four litre jugs. It is tougher than the wood that is being glued but I wouldn't use it in boat building. I have used epoxies but I typically avoid (but it is great for boat building) as it is toxic. I am contemplating using epoxy and glass cloth to protect the end of that paddle mentioned above. Contact cement is really useful and really toxic and I only use this when gluing down wood veneers. The glue that appeared in your video looked a lot like what we call white glue which is a general purpose glue which dries transparent - the Yellow Glue is much stronger. So I would use the yellow glue. I get glue squeeze out (but I don't over clamp) as the glue is easily scrapped off when it dries - do not wipe it away just let dry and scrap it off. The glue line is not visible I would put feet on the bottom of my cutting board (you would need a thicker cutting board say around 6 centimetres or more - feet on both sides of the board - think black walnut dowel with the protruding end rounded over - I use both sides of my board - one for meat with a drain ring to catch the blood from draining onto the work surface but mostly veg on the other side) as this will keep the board being effected by any water sitting between the board and the work surface. I warped my cutting board as I left it overnight sitting in a bit of water between the cutting board and the work surface. It more or less flattened out now as it was allowed to thoroughly dry but it took quite a while.

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  • Low Tech Greenhouse Automation : Cooling, Warming, Watering

    I love those actuators. I took a green house building course years ago centred our climate here in the Great White North, Canada, For heating, one of the easiest ways to use the Sun to heat barrels of water (paint the barrels black and put water in them). Those actuators look like a golden idea. Thank you for your Instructable.

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  • Wild-Bill made the instructable Tourtiere With a Twist
    Tourtiere With a Twist

    Thank you again for your Instructable. I hunted around to find a French Canadian spice mix. I settled on sage, thyme, oregano, clove, cinnamon, nutmeg, pepper and salt. It was pretty conservative and if I do it again I will definitely bump it up. I use a lard pastry that I use for fruit pies. I just dropped the sugar and doubled the salt (1/2 to 1 teaspoon). I really like the apples, that is a stroke of genius. Bon Appetit!

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  • Raspberry and Hibiscus Meringue Pie With Natural Dyes

    I made a Lemon Meringue pie not that long ago. It looked beautiful. I haven't had it in a very very long time and I made it the way my mother made it. I didn't like it as I thought it was just too sweet and I was thinking of taking a run at it again. It isn't going to happen. Why because of your instructable. I love raspberries and the idea of making a Raspberry Meringue pie has me drooling.

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  • Tourtiere With a Twist

    In Quebec traditionally it contains cloves as well.

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  • Tourtiere With a Twist

    It looks delicious. I really like your idea of using apples. I make a great pastry but as yet I have never made a savoury pie. I always liked the idea of making a Tourtiere. I checked the other week and noticed that my local has ground pork. Thank you for your instructable.

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  • Making a Tiny Mac From a Raspberry Pi Zero

    It is so darn cute. I would never build one but your project gave me a idea for a project I have been thinking about - in fact it is a project I implemented and gave to my grandson. I might get my some in law involved as he has a 3D printer. Thanks for your fun Instructable.

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  • Super-fast DIY Slide Scanner

    Super-fast you say. I have every slide and every negative of every picture I have taken in my life, except for some work I did as a professional photographer. They are all in a big box. I picked up a used Nikon Cool Scan where I managed to get through a few slides but it was daunting. I already use a RPi (2B) as a media centre for play music through my stereo and as I have play list on my music collection I thought I could have slide shows on my TV. All my files of course are on my personal computer. Thus your project piques my interest plus I have a Kodak Carousel around here somewhere. I thought of creating programs to look through a collection to add, change, manipulate and extract photograph metadata (along the lines of Exif tools but with a GUI front end (https://awesomeopensource.co…

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    Super-fast you say. I have every slide and every negative of every picture I have taken in my life, except for some work I did as a professional photographer. They are all in a big box. I picked up a used Nikon Cool Scan where I managed to get through a few slides but it was daunting. I already use a RPi (2B) as a media centre for play music through my stereo and as I have play list on my music collection I thought I could have slide shows on my TV. All my files of course are on my personal computer. Thus your project piques my interest plus I have a Kodak Carousel around here somewhere. I thought of creating programs to look through a collection to add, change, manipulate and extract photograph metadata (along the lines of Exif tools but with a GUI front end (https://awesomeopensource.com/projects/exif & https://sourceforge.net/directory/graphics/graphics/graphics-editors/metadata/os:linux/)) as I also have a huge collection of digital photos. Thank you very much for your project as you have reignited my imagination for some of my own projects.

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  • Adjustable Gripping Hitch

    I am a knot head. I have used a very similar knot to tie tent guy lines. I noticed that your knot you have needs to be set so it doesn't slip. It has been a while since I tied one but here it is.

    I have use a knot with a similar function. I use it for tying tent guy lines. The only difference I see is that the knot I use doesn't have to be set so that it does not slide on a guy line.

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  • Coil Winder Using Arduino

    I love the way the way you put this Instructable together. I am working on a couple of teach myself Arduino projects so I am familiar some of your sources. I didn't know about the Hall Effect so in under a minute I learned something new and I got a weird idea on how to apply it, so thanks.

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  • DIY Mini UPS for WiFi Router V2.0

    Thanks for the great Instructable and I am going to build myself one and one for a friend. I would make the boxes out of wood (I have done that a lot) as I don't have a 3D printer. I was thinking wouldn't one of those cheap Banggood spot welders would have been a better choice than soldering onto the batteries. Your project has got me thinking about other uses that I could put your design towards.

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  • Amazing Homemade Pumpkin Pie

    I follow you and I enjoy your recipes - When I see pumpkin pie where the pumpkin out of a can, I cringe. Not only are they easy to grow but the pumpkin is easy to process and store. My mother made pumpkin pie but she didn't use pumpkin she used Hubbard Squash. I keep my recipes on my computer as it is super easy to make modify and leave suggestions for myself for the next time. Under my flaky pie crust recipe (I can now make flaky pastry nearly as good as mothers - it taken me a lot of pies to get me there - except for a small wedge I give them away) I have an entry for Pumpkin Pie (of course). So far I think the best pumpkin comes from the smaller varieties of pumpkin though one day I am going to have to give Hubbard Squash a try. After I have made the cooked mashed pumpkin I take the su…

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    I follow you and I enjoy your recipes - When I see pumpkin pie where the pumpkin out of a can, I cringe. Not only are they easy to grow but the pumpkin is easy to process and store. My mother made pumpkin pie but she didn't use pumpkin she used Hubbard Squash. I keep my recipes on my computer as it is super easy to make modify and leave suggestions for myself for the next time. Under my flaky pie crust recipe (I can now make flaky pastry nearly as good as mothers - it taken me a lot of pies to get me there - except for a small wedge I give them away) I have an entry for Pumpkin Pie (of course). So far I think the best pumpkin comes from the smaller varieties of pumpkin though one day I am going to have to give Hubbard Squash a try. After I have made the cooked mashed pumpkin I take the surplus and measure and freeze it for future pumpkin pies. From my recipe:"To prepare the mashed pumpkin: Use 1 1/2 pounds of skin-on, raw pumpkin to yield 2 cups of mashed. Halve pumpkin and scoop out seeds and stringy portions. Cut pumpkin into chunks. In saucepan over medium heat, in 1 inch of boiling water, heat the pumpkin to a boil. Reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer for 30 minutes or until tender. Drain, cool and remove the peel. Return pumpkin to the saucepan and mash with a potato masher or use a food mill."My recipe calls for evaporated milk (I am way more comfortable using evaporated milk as my mother always had it on hand and never used condensed milk) and I always use ground cinnamon, ground ginger (I start with minced dried ginger it holds its flavour over long periods of time), freshly ground nutmeg, 1 cloves clove ground. I use way more spice than your recipe calls for. further I cook my flaky pie crust and pumpkin filling together. I always make a pumpkin pie for a friend for Canadian Thanksgiving. I have a couple of farmers markets coming up in my area so I better hurry and buy a small pumpkin. Your Instructable as jarred me into action - thanks.

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  • Pan Bagna - a Vegetarian Delight

    It looks simply delicious. Thank you for your Instructable.

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  • Automated All Grain Electric Beer Brewery for 100 €/USD

    The heating elements will caramelise some of the sugars and thus darken the beer a bit, that wouldn't look right per style with things like Czech Pilsner or Kolsch.

    Arduino is simpler as it is not encumbered by a huge operating system. So from the standpoint of process control the Arduino is king and there piles of hardware and code to do the task. The RPi can be used but I would view as the holder of knowledge. The interface between the RPi and the Arduino is simple as it is serial and can be run across USB. For example, hooking up a load cell, a digital thermometer or relay up to an Arduino is trivial. To make a program to determine volumes water and temperature against weights of grain and resulting estimated alcohol well that would be better done on the RPi. The other issue is the OS on the Rpi is not a Real Time OS.I only looked at this project as I have been contemplating building a small batch automated beer machine. His batch size is too big …

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    Arduino is simpler as it is not encumbered by a huge operating system. So from the standpoint of process control the Arduino is king and there piles of hardware and code to do the task. The RPi can be used but I would view as the holder of knowledge. The interface between the RPi and the Arduino is simple as it is serial and can be run across USB. For example, hooking up a load cell, a digital thermometer or relay up to an Arduino is trivial. To make a program to determine volumes water and temperature against weights of grain and resulting estimated alcohol well that would be better done on the RPi. The other issue is the OS on the Rpi is not a Real Time OS.I only looked at this project as I have been contemplating building a small batch automated beer machine. His batch size is too big but I am sure I can learn something interesting here.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on Sawdust Willy's instructable Cedar Garden Shed
    Cedar Garden Shed

    I did something similar, except mine was a sauna. I did it so I could go through the construction process. It was one of those things that snuck onto my bucket because I have always wanted a sauna. Your design and execution is very cool.

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  • Cado COPYCAT Ice Cream Recipe (No Ice Cream Machine Needed!)

    I love ice cream, I even owned a restaurant sized commercial ice cream maker and got rid of it after six months because I put on 20 pounds. I have moved further to the vegan side of the food spectrum over the years and I have tried making vegan ice cream with mediocre results. Your recipe looks to address what I thought that was missing in previous recipes that I have tried, and that is fat content. So I have bookmarked your recipe and will give it a try when I dropped a bit of this Covid weight. Thank you for your instructable.

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  • Camping Car  ( Apocalypse Car )

    That is exactly what I was thinking. I drive across a big chunk of Canada usually twice a year nearly 4000km each way and it takes 3 nights accommodation. I thought of towing a teardrop but then what would I do with it once I am at my destination. Removing the front passenger seat doesn't look to difficult in my Golf TDI. It is such a simple idea for a small car. So many thanks.

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  • Super Easy Raised Garden Bed

    Great design but "PLEASE DON'T USE PRESSURE TREATED WOOD". Untreated Western Red Cedar, Redwood and even Kiln Dried Douglas Fir will last a long time. Pressure treated contains chemicals that are not very good for you which you will be consuming when you eat the food you have grown.

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  • Anyone Can Make an Authentic Pizza

    OO flour is big thing to getting the right texture. I have only seen in for sale in a speciality store which I frequent only occasionally, but bread flour or general purpose flour works fine. I have a wooden peel that I made myself from a piece of 1/8" plywood (it fits perfectly into my wood burning stove's oven that I can only used in the winter with all windows open) and a big commercial metal peel (and I also have a big honking pizza knife curtsy of hanging out a auctions). I do most of my work with the wooden peel but occasionally that metal one comes in really handy. I always wonder why people think kneading dough by hand is difficult as it is not. I make my own tomato based sauce (a spicy (contains a bit of some chipotle) sun dried tomato walnut pesto), basil pesto and one of …

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    OO flour is big thing to getting the right texture. I have only seen in for sale in a speciality store which I frequent only occasionally, but bread flour or general purpose flour works fine. I have a wooden peel that I made myself from a piece of 1/8" plywood (it fits perfectly into my wood burning stove's oven that I can only used in the winter with all windows open) and a big commercial metal peel (and I also have a big honking pizza knife curtsy of hanging out a auctions). I do most of my work with the wooden peel but occasionally that metal one comes in really handy. I always wonder why people think kneading dough by hand is difficult as it is not. I make my own tomato based sauce (a spicy (contains a bit of some chipotle) sun dried tomato walnut pesto), basil pesto and one of my absolute favourite truffle infused olive oil on what I call my forager pizza. I cook my pizza in my gas oven on unglazed field tiles at 450 for about 12 minutes. I find mozzarella to be a tasteless cheese and I opt for the final layer Asiago or Provolone in its' stead. I have always used cornmeal but I am going to give your flour trick a try. Everything I know about making pizza I have learned from others, so thank you very much for your Instructable as you have given me a couple of new things to try out.

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  • Camping Car  ( Apocalypse Car )

    Truly insane, so I absolutely love your idea. I have a lovely vehicle a 2005 VW 5 door Golf TDI. It only has 430kkm and I have always whined to myself that I couldn't sleep in it so I couldn't use it as a camper. I have turned it to a station wagon but that was already there. I just need to figure out how to remove the front passenger seat without damaging it. Your project got me thinking - thanks for your Instructable.

    I just found a Youtube video that showed me how to remove the front passenger seat without damaging it. Thanks again for the inspiration.

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  • Mid Century Modern Chess Pieces

    Wow, what an absolutely fantastic design and implementation. The design you chose is world class. Thank you for sharing it.

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  • Digitalize Your Hi-fi System

    Oh, it is XBMC, which is cool project but a bit too all encompassing for me as I already do battle with other software that I haven't written as I bend it to my will. It was the main reason I ran away from Windows, streaming, those so many years ago and the hair still stands up on my neck when some one asks me for help with their windows PC.

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  • A Replica Wooden Internet Radio

    I have been messing around with Raspberry PIs from day one (I got one from the initial release). Your project is beautiful. I have been messing and have an RPi2B with a HiFiBerry which accesses my music library on my computer via NFS (ya I run Linux but SAMBA will work with Windows file sharing). I had a micron of success using a FLIRC and a remote to control it which was barely worth the effort as compared to running a remote console on my phone. You got me excited by your project because not only to I have a ton on veneer, I also have a pile of electronics. Hey, I go to a lot of Estate Auctions. I have been looking for an easy way to stream CBC (my radio station of choice) and most music players will not play it but I haven't tried VOLUMEO but I will give it try on my main box. Thanks …

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    I have been messing around with Raspberry PIs from day one (I got one from the initial release). Your project is beautiful. I have been messing and have an RPi2B with a HiFiBerry which accesses my music library on my computer via NFS (ya I run Linux but SAMBA will work with Windows file sharing). I had a micron of success using a FLIRC and a remote to control it which was barely worth the effort as compared to running a remote console on my phone. You got me excited by your project because not only to I have a ton on veneer, I also have a pile of electronics. Hey, I go to a lot of Estate Auctions. I have been looking for an easy way to stream CBC (my radio station of choice) and most music players will not play it but I haven't tried VOLUMEO but I will give it try on my main box. Thanks again for you very cool project.

    I have only ever got CBC to work through browsers as opposed to an Internet radio player. I have tried some weird tricks without any luck. I figured I could pull it off with Pulse Audio but it is a bit of a hair puller and I eventually gave it up because I could access my RPI through my phone and do what ever I wanted. At that point I was trying to create a timed radio recorder. One can do some seemingly weird stuff on Linux so I haven't tried everything yet. Your project got me thinking that you could do some cool effects by using a potentiometer to change stations and add static for effect dial in on podcasts of old radio shows. Tie to a back lit analog display through a front window like you have on the front of your box. I lived in central BC as a child and there wasn't any TV broadc…

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    I have only ever got CBC to work through browsers as opposed to an Internet radio player. I have tried some weird tricks without any luck. I figured I could pull it off with Pulse Audio but it is a bit of a hair puller and I eventually gave it up because I could access my RPI through my phone and do what ever I wanted. At that point I was trying to create a timed radio recorder. One can do some seemingly weird stuff on Linux so I haven't tried everything yet. Your project got me thinking that you could do some cool effects by using a potentiometer to change stations and add static for effect dial in on podcasts of old radio shows. Tie to a back lit analog display through a front window like you have on the front of your box. I lived in central BC as a child and there wasn't any TV broadcast available but there was radio shows. Front end it with an Arduino as it handles analogue without a blink and pad the tuning position with software generated static like it was a real radio. You could use something like a radio band selector knob (all those old radios had a many bands to choose from, my granny had a huge console radio) to determine the current function. I have in my collection the original Hitch Hikers Guide to the Galaxy but things like Boston Blacky series (and its' like) and of course one of the great classics, Orson Welle's the War of The Worlds, should be available somewhere on the Internet. You got me thinking of all the insane possibilities - of course high tech interface as well (one position on the band selector nob). Cheers Mate.

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  • Mechanical Seven Segment Display Clock

    I am currently learning online about the Arduino with my son in law as one of my Pandemic activities . Your project is super cool, and as my son in law is also playing with a 3D printer I will forward a link on to him. I worked in IT for most of my working life and playing around with the Arduino reminds me of the fun I had when I played around with microprocessors back in the early days where programmed was done in machine language and it was entered on a teletype machine language and saved on paper tape.

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  • Cine Ambulante, the Traveling Cinema

    A link to my friend's page http://www.mclawlor.ca/ and an article written about him https://www.vancouverisawesome.com/events-and-entertainment/vancouver-was-awesome-the-magic-lantern-view-1923114. I believe, you would have liked him and he would have liked what you are doing. He mentored a lot of artists.

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  • Cine Ambulante, the Traveling Cinema

    I say bravo. A friend of mine use to collect Magic Lantern Slides and he would put on performances where he would dress up in an antique set of tails. So keep it up.

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  • Paracord Daisy Chain

    Thanks for the suggestion. I just went out and did up a 12 gauge extension cord. That is quick and easy way to handle them.

    I like your idea. I started mine with a simple overhand knot and I finished by taking the lead through the loop as it is simpler. I thought if one can do it twice why not three times. I happen to have a 100 feet of paracode at my disposal so why knot give a try. It is a simple lanyard knot which I have used before while making fancy lanyards mixed in with others knots that I learned from Ashley's Book of Knots. It was fun to try so thanks for your instructable.

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  • PiNAS - the Raspberry Pi NAS

    I find your hack of the RPi to be impressive. I have a couple of ideas for the Pi Zero W that requires adding a couple SD slots, battery & charging system so I can back up pictures from my camera using something like rsync and remote terminal for configuration to backup to a wireless device or second SD card. I am a software as opposed to a hardware guy but you give me the courage to try. I thanks you for your instructable.

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  • CNC Etch a Sketch (and Video Player)

    I watched your video and your project looks like a lot of fun. I am a long time Pi fan and was even following the project even before it became the Raspberry Pi. I even got my hands on one from the original release. Your project inspires me, so thank you.

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  • Backyard Shou Sugi Ban

    It is not difficult. I use a tiger torch. It is not traditional but it does the job. The only wood I use is Cedar which is very traditional. I just move the torch back and forth on the piece of wood supported off the ground usually on bricks where nothing else will catch fire and then put the fire out. I scrub off the char with a nylon brush and I remove the loose char with more water. It is a time consuming and messy. Then when the wood is dry I apply boiled linseed oil. I do not use the traditional Tung Oil as it is very expensive. I brush it on and then wipe off the excess with rags. WARNING boiled linseed oil is a drying oil. The rags can spontaneously ignite, so do not store them in a lump close other combustible material. If you need to store them in a lump put them in a metal se…

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    It is not difficult. I use a tiger torch. It is not traditional but it does the job. The only wood I use is Cedar which is very traditional. I just move the torch back and forth on the piece of wood supported off the ground usually on bricks where nothing else will catch fire and then put the fire out. I scrub off the char with a nylon brush and I remove the loose char with more water. It is a time consuming and messy. Then when the wood is dry I apply boiled linseed oil. I do not use the traditional Tung Oil as it is very expensive. I brush it on and then wipe off the excess with rags. WARNING boiled linseed oil is a drying oil. The rags can spontaneously ignite, so do not store them in a lump close other combustible material. If you need to store them in a lump put them in a metal sealed container. I do not store them in a lump. This is everything I know about Shou Sugi Ban.

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  • Your project, just by itself is very meaningful. For me it is WOW, as you are bringing bunch of different hardware to accomplish this noble task. The technology you have put makes your instructable stellar. I related to your project immediately because when I was working in the forest industry, I investigated building a mesh network for monitoring cut blocks across our range with additionally placed routers. Yes, this would be one very good class project.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on ejmastnak's instructable Save a Burned Pot

    Your instructions are simple and it looks like it takes a lot less elbow grease. Next time I put my porridge on more than simmer and go off and post comments on Instructables I will have to give it a try. Good post and simple memorable instructions - Thanks.

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  • The sponge technique is usable for all yeast breads. Not only does it create flavour, but it works the gluten. I struggled to make baguettes for a long time, while trying to used a recipe in Joy of Cooking. Using the sponge method in making bread, learned from a German Master Baker. A sour dough sponge is the ultimate way to go. I had a really nice sour dough for quite while and I even started a sour dough from scratch a couple of times with mixed results. I don't make enough bread anymore to keep sour dough going. Tip: instead of using a bowl with water. spray the inside of the oven heavily with water immediately before putting the loafs in the oven. I found it works better than the water bowl/pan technique. Good Instructable.

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  • I have looked a lot of paddles and I like the look of the Otter Tail. I thought printing out your PDF pattern was a bit of a pain and thought making a hard board 1/2 template, for me made more sense. That way I could reproduce the paddle easily with without fussing and make length adjustment a no brainer. I used your PDF and laid it on a 1" grid making it easy to create the template from a regulate piece of paper. Thanks for the leg up.

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  • My roasters are now my friends. Through them I have learned even more about coffee. In the sense of making big money in coffee, their business model is crazy. She (one of the principles) bought 400 hectares of cloud jungle in Mexico - preserving it from development. The local villages (6) pick the wild coffee beans and she buys the coffee beans from them. Their company is called Frog Friendly Wild. They were investigated for false advertising because the powers that be, could not believe that anyone would use their business model, which of course they were. Truly lovely people and truly lovely coffee.

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  • Good on ya, I messed around with popcorn air poppers over the years for roasting coffee. I never went quite this far thus thus the Hurrah. Every once in a while I think about taking another run at it. I have a coffee roaster just down the street and they would sell me some nice green beans. You have done some good work here.

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  • Of your kitchen cabinet project I have to admit I love those pulls the best. You have solved one of the biggest problems, uniformity, by saying it will be in style. Your are not just a master cabinet maker but you are also an artist. Those pulls are beautifully right brained and you have the technical skills to bring it to fruition.

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  • The Microcement is "Meh" compared to the end result. You are a Master Cabinet Maker, if you don't have that designation, then you deserve it. Your design of that fitted kitchen in that space is totally amazing. The way you work with hand tool is mesmerising. Your effective use of power tools was refreshing. The end result in fit and finish is stunning. I am going to have add a router plane or a plow plane to my kit.

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  • I love the vertical drawer. I did a pantry with a bunch of them mind you mine were only accessible from one side and I installed mine in an already made pantry cabinet.

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  • From a cyclist who likes to dabble in electronics, I totally love your project. I just have to find that clincher brake I replaced with a disk a few years back.

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  • You make beautiful tools and I love the precision of your work but the way you use a table saw totally freaks me out. You need to make yourself a push stick. It also sets a very bad example for beginning woodworkers out there.

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  • I am a real fan of the raspberry PI Zero W, for hardware interface control projects because so easy to create a user interface just by to connect to it over WiFi which I can easily use my phone and if I was feeling a bit insane I could backbone it on the Internet across VPN, that of course would be total overkill for controlling an espresso machine.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on fretters's instructable Computer Drawer

    I love your Idea. I have always struggled with computer boxes. I have one that I really like in that it goes a great job of keeping dust out of the case as well as keeping everything cool. I thought it had a rack mounted attachment but it turned out the loaded box wasn't strong enough to hang off a 19" rack. I might mount some long drawer slides on it. Thanks for the idea.

    Hi FrettersYou miss understand. What I was trying to express and I guess I did so poorly, is that as my box was (poorly) designed as a 19 inch rack box but is a good box would work with long drawer slides attached to it. It opens from the top very unlike a lot of PC boxes. I think I might have some 24" slides in my shop. I stripped the this box and am currently using some of the guts in another another box. The MB in this box is fried. Those screens in front of the fans collect a lot of the dust and they are easy to remove and clean. I had built a shelf under my desk but it was a real pain to use because it did not give easy access to the back side of the unit. With drawer slides the problem will be solved. Thanks again.

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  • Chances are about 99%, because I know nothing about your 'puter, and I did encountered a Chrome Book what had an SSD at chip level wired in. Beyond that if it is even a marginally new (which by your standard is really old) it most likely has an Sata drive. These multi interfaces (SATA and ATA/IDE) are fairly cheap - you just have to be more careful handling the drive. Thermaltake comes with rubber like drive covers for both 3.5 & 2.5 drives but it is only SATA. If get the multi-interfaces one get it with USB 3 as it is so much faster.

    I have two different types of USB - Harddrive attachments. One very similar to Thermaltake ST0005U-C I plug my harddrives into, unfortunately it only handles SATA format. I have on really old one that handles both SATA and ATA/IDE. It doesn't look like much as it is just a bunch of cables and connectors. I have unfortunately broken the SATA power plug. The Thermaltake is slick and handles both 3.5 and 2.5 drives. I would have shown a picture of my Thermaltake but I cleaned up my office and I have no idea were I put it. If you go on AMAZON you should be able to find something that will do the job.

    Future proof yourself. If I push data I want USB 3. If I buy a thumb drive I buy USB 3. My last laptop that I had and gave away had USB 3. My current box (an old gamers machine) I added a USB 3 card. I USB 3 like hard drives, thumb drives etc. but I also use it with a sound digitizer (USB 2) and push big data without the worry of sharing band width with other USB devices.

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  • I fix up old computers all the time. I did a really old one with Lubuntu 32bit. I had to fuss a bit to get it running well. I replaced a fellows laptop OS with Linux as he was having so much trouble with Windows. I set him up on Linux and now he is happy as he can be. My current machine is a rescue. It was an old non-running gaming machine and now it smokes and can push 4 monitors. I put on the latest Ubuntu - I am not loving it but works well. I am a bit disappointed that Ubuntu is dropping support for 32bit. It is not a big deal as I can always go back and use Debian. Oh, I have piles of parts. I through out a bunch of smaller ATA hard drives because I never thought I would use them again (decommissioned them with a a couple of whacks of a hammer). You need to find someone like me who h…

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    I fix up old computers all the time. I did a really old one with Lubuntu 32bit. I had to fuss a bit to get it running well. I replaced a fellows laptop OS with Linux as he was having so much trouble with Windows. I set him up on Linux and now he is happy as he can be. My current machine is a rescue. It was an old non-running gaming machine and now it smokes and can push 4 monitors. I put on the latest Ubuntu - I am not loving it but works well. I am a bit disappointed that Ubuntu is dropping support for 32bit. It is not a big deal as I can always go back and use Debian. Oh, I have piles of parts. I through out a bunch of smaller ATA hard drives because I never thought I would use them again (decommissioned them with a a couple of whacks of a hammer). You need to find someone like me who have piles of parts. Ya I give them away. The last machine I bought new was a super nice little laptop that had a design problem and it was being sold off cheap. Before I bought it, I went out on line and found a couple of people who figured out how to fix the problem. I had it for about a year and I gave it to friend's daughter who need a laptop for college. Older box type computers are easier to work on as they come apart easily but laptops can be a bit tricky to tear down especially if they have hidden clips. I spent most of my working life dealing with computers from very small to very large and in my opinion Lenovo and IBM pc/laptops are some of the nicest computers designed to be worked on. So, have no fear!

    Ya just remove the hard drive and using a usb device, connect it up to another computer and down load the files on the drive. I have one for Sata and another for ATA drives. It should be no problem finding a USB Sata interface but the ATA might be a bit more difficult. The most common failure is the power supply which are really hard to find a replace.

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  • I would call it the Instructable project of the Year. When I was a child I was fascinated by jet engines and read about them but believed I would never be able to build one. What you have built there is really scary but totally brilliant. I like the way you sited your information. Your minimalist approach is what makes this a truly fantastic instructable, NO I am not going to build it.

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  • I like your project but I totally love the sand paper clamping trick.

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  • I am an old fart (70) who has been messing around with Pi from when they were first available. Yes I was one of the first to order the original Pi. I have now been looking at the Arduino (robust hardware interface projects) and Micro:Bit (for a local community maker shop class). Thanks for doing this presentation.

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  • When it comes to canned Tomatoes, if it doesn't come from Italy then it is packed with salt, I believe, in the attempt to be other than tasteless. In Canada they are not hard to find but they are much more expensive. I use sun dried tomatoes in my pizza sauce which rightfully would be called Sun Dried Tomato-Walnut Pesto with Italian tomato paste for colour an Chipotle for zing and generous amount of garlic for savoury.

    I figured out in my life that it is worth buying the best food I can afford and that is probably why I use Sun Dried Tomatoes in my pizza sauce, or should I say pesto, as they are grown until they a ripe with a really lovely intense flavour. I also grow and sometimes can my own tomatoes which are as good if not better than canned tomatoes from Italy. I purchase Organic Italian canned tomatoes for less than 3 times what I would pay for the same brand with canned Canadian tomatoes. There is a import store in the next town that sells San Marzano canned tomatoes, if I remember correctly, at close to $6cnd a can. No, I have never purchased them. I started using Italian canned tomatoes when someone pointed out to me how much more salt is used in Canadian canned tomatoes. When I cook with them…

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    I figured out in my life that it is worth buying the best food I can afford and that is probably why I use Sun Dried Tomatoes in my pizza sauce, or should I say pesto, as they are grown until they a ripe with a really lovely intense flavour. I also grow and sometimes can my own tomatoes which are as good if not better than canned tomatoes from Italy. I purchase Organic Italian canned tomatoes for less than 3 times what I would pay for the same brand with canned Canadian tomatoes. There is a import store in the next town that sells San Marzano canned tomatoes, if I remember correctly, at close to $6cnd a can. No, I have never purchased them. I started using Italian canned tomatoes when someone pointed out to me how much more salt is used in Canadian canned tomatoes. When I cook with them, I feel, Italian canned tomatoes really makes a difference in the end product. Cheers.

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  • You got me at Raspberry Pi and coffee.

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  • I started by using Finish Line and am currently using a product called White Lightning, but now Bar Oil, is a incredibly inexpensive way to lubricate a chain. I saw an instructable for making Wax lubricant but I haven't tried it. My bike chains last me about 4,000km via a chain wear gauge. I have gone longer but then I start wearing out sprockets and chain rings.

    I totally agree kerosene does a very brilliant job cleaning bike chain and I would reuse it in a similar way. I haven't seen or used that chain cleaner. I had one and it eventually failed so I used a chain break and put the chain in a yogurt container with the kerosene and shake it up. You are right to wear barrier gloves which I didn't take precautions in those days. It never even dawned on me to use Bar Oil. This such a great and inexpensive way to maintain a bike chain. I now use wax based lubricants which illuminates the need to clean my chain. Ya, they are kind of expensive but I cycle tour and the less stuff I carry the better.

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  • I have resurrected a few old laptops and PCs. I just did a IBM ThinkCentre running a late generation P4 with 1M of ram and a 80GB drive. I really like those machines as they are so elegantly built. It was running XP but it had been totally hacked. And I got it up and running with Lubuntu i386 18.04. I had one software issue with LibreOffice but I found the solution on line. Warning the default installs do not create a Swap Partition on the harddrive, and these older machines really need a Swap Partition for memory management. All my Linux installs have a Swap Partition. It is possible to make your own replacement laptop batteries but would not recommend as some of the highly capable batteries can explosive or catch fire.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on jprussack's instructable Backyard Pizza

    The tires I have are 8"x8" 3/8" thick with some ribbing on the back and a terracotta colour. I just butt 4 of them together on an oven rack. I cannot see why granite wouldn't work. I include a QAD picture with my webcam of one tile which has developed a interesting patina over the years.

    On the Great "Pizza Stone vs Baking Sheet" controversy, my I suggest that one use, what are called, Field Tiles. They are unglazed fired clay tiles possibly available at your tile speciality store. They are dirt cheap, easy to store and they make fantastic pizza. I make pizza all the time, as it is so easy. I hope you Instructable gets more people to give making their own pizza a try.

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  • The presentation got me to look at your pizza instructable. It looks absolutely delicious. I do all my pizza from scratch. Making your own Pizza dough is nothing the only thing I do out of the ordinary is add course ground garlic powder. Pizza sauce is a bit more effort than opening can but I cheat and make what I call Sun Dried Tomato Walnut Pesto with Chipotle, and this includes lots of garlic, olive oil and some tomato paste for colour. I always make a lot when I do and keep the unused portion in the freezer. Some times I don't use sauce at all but truffle oil especially when I do my Forager Pizza which has wild mushrooms (when I don't have any wild mushrooms I use Shiitake mushrooms), garlic, goats feta and provolone. I cook my Pizzas on unglazed tiles (which I bought from a local til…

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    The presentation got me to look at your pizza instructable. It looks absolutely delicious. I do all my pizza from scratch. Making your own Pizza dough is nothing the only thing I do out of the ordinary is add course ground garlic powder. Pizza sauce is a bit more effort than opening can but I cheat and make what I call Sun Dried Tomato Walnut Pesto with Chipotle, and this includes lots of garlic, olive oil and some tomato paste for colour. I always make a lot when I do and keep the unused portion in the freezer. Some times I don't use sauce at all but truffle oil especially when I do my Forager Pizza which has wild mushrooms (when I don't have any wild mushrooms I use Shiitake mushrooms), garlic, goats feta and provolone. I cook my Pizzas on unglazed tiles (which I bought from a local tile store) and I made a Pizza Peel (Pizza paddle) out of a scrape of 3/8" plywood. The pizza shown below I call a my Three Cheese Haggis Pizza and that is the Peel I made in about 15 minutes about 10 years ago. I was so impressed by the look of your pizza I decided to throw a couple of these ideas at you so you can up your game.

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  • I love the idea of a clock expressing time as a series of quotes. I am going to run with. Thanks

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  • I like your approach just varying one variable. I have an exception that you probably missed because it is totally radical and that is to not use any cream cheese. I took a vegetarian cooking course many years ago and we made vegan cheese cake. I use to make it and take it to work occasionally. It was delicious and I gave many copies of the recipe away. I misplaced the the recipe about twenty years ago so I haven't made it since. It was based on Tofu and Oil to get the right consistency.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on JettaKnight's instructable Cast Concrete Bench

    It is a good rock solid project and a good Instructable. Except for being messy and heavy, I too really like working with concrete. Bubbles are always a problem even with a proper concrete agitator but I found using a grinder or course polisher and use a slurry and fill them and I go over the top and expose the aggregate and polish it (now that is messy) to a gloss. With the concrete with some black colourant and some light coloured aggregate like Dolomite, the end result looking like granite. Your Instructable, I believe, will get people out there building some amazing things.

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  • Your instructable is inspiring. It is not that I would want to build a guitar but with dedication and the willing to learn one can accomplish anything. Thank you.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on makendo's instructable Cabinet Spice Rack

    You solved the problem quite elegantly. Typical shelving just does not work right as stuff gets buried behind other stuff and one cannot find anything. I never though about it until a friend who made a suggestion when I was planning a major house renovation which included the kitchen and that was to make a floor to ceiling cabinet where the shelves were only 4 inches deep. I didn't use that idea but I put pull outs with shelves in my cabinets that were only as deep as they need to be. The density it super high and nothing get buried. Not as elegant as your solution but it works.

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  • I wouldn't have built it that way (I don't work with metal) but I love your design - it is super elegant.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on jkratman's instructable Pallet Adirondack Chair

    I have never tried to build an of Adirondack chair out of pallet wood but I did build a couple from "1 by" fir shiplap sheathing that came off of my old house during a renovation and some fir "2 by" that I had left over. I didn't use plans except the design in my head (i got into a bit of a bother making the second chair for my wife but fixed it). It was a lot of fun and challenging trying to measure anything anatomically. Some curves I drew by hand and others with a string compass. My next one will be mostly of pallet wood thanks for you insanely detailed Instructable as it got me to read it and it inspired me to give it a try.

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  • Thank you, Thank you. You have presented solutions to two problems for several of my Raspberry Pi projects. Your remote control solution is way more elegant and functional than using a Flirc and I am going to have to give it a try. I will try to adapt it for my WiFi HiFi NFS media player attached to my stereo as the Flirc can only do single keystrokes. I have been thinking of adding a battery pack to a couple of Raspberry PI projects (car computer and a several remote sensors).

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  • From all the crazies, innovators, and thinkers out there, I sincerely thank you for your instructable. When it comes to electronics, I typically clobber things together and then try to smooth out the corners by using software, as I am not where near as courageous or as knowledgeable you. I give you two thumbs up.

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  • Built-in Kitchen Shelves!

    That is an incredible way of increasing storage space. Being 3 1/2 inches deep it is nearly perfect. I too have a small kitchen and have found ways to increase storage using things like a ceiling hung pot rack. A friend of mine, who was also a contractor at the time, told be about creating a floor to ceiling cabinet where the shelves were only 4" deep, so nothing would get hidden behind anything else, which is similar to your solution. I turned that idea around and put it onto pull out shelves. My solution is no where as pretty as yours but as functional.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on gunnie24's instructable Modern Console Cabinet

    I am a Mid-century modern fan. I like your interpretation. Those doors are perfect. I am sitting on a pile of Teak veneer I picked up for 2 cents on the dollar at an auction. When I get some time, I might give it a try, as my white 1970s Ikea console should be replaced. I don't trust pocket screws structurally and tend to use them sparingly and use more wood joinery and glue, but they sure simplify the process. Thanks.

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  • Wild-Bill commented on LanceMakes's instructable PVC & Duct Tape Kayak

    Your instructable/idea of building a kayak out of pvc is provocative. George Dyson wrote a book called Baidarka where he builds a kayak with a metal tubular frame. It got me thinking that PVC could be used as it is not too hard to bend PVC. Thanks for the instructable.

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  • It is always nice to see that you don't need a bunch of power tools to make something and you have done a lovely job. I am not as masterful but I do understand the pleasure in working with hand tools - Their use being relatively quiet for me is one of the attactions. Thank You

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  • Or a KiwiNext time I make a Pizza. Nice method, so thanks for the instructable.

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  • I have seen a lots of ideas about chain saw mills. The idea of using a ladder and cutting down hill are truly innovative. I have a wood lot and the idea of having a chain saw mill holds interest for me but I only have a 20 inch bar on my chainsaw which is good for felling and perfect cutting firewood but a bit small for a chainsaw mill. Your instructable is very informative and extremely well done.

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  • Cool - I feel that the Internet has had its effect on reducing the people who might have become interested in HAM radio. I find your project fascinating and I have just learned some thing new. Years ago I looked at building a repeater based data transfer system for a forest products company (I was the IT weeny). The idea was floated to me by by a HAM who developed a business creating remote security monitoring systems. I encountered him as he was looking into real time open source video compression. Unfortunately my company wasn't willing to consider the proposal. It would have been so simple to pull off using just handhelds. We already had most of the physical locations (for out radio network) and we only really needed one new location to get the data network to work to fully cover out…

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    Cool - I feel that the Internet has had its effect on reducing the people who might have become interested in HAM radio. I find your project fascinating and I have just learned some thing new. Years ago I looked at building a repeater based data transfer system for a forest products company (I was the IT weeny). The idea was floated to me by by a HAM who developed a business creating remote security monitoring systems. I encountered him as he was looking into real time open source video compression. Unfortunately my company wasn't willing to consider the proposal. It would have been so simple to pull off using just handhelds. We already had most of the physical locations (for out radio network) and we only really needed one new location to get the data network to work to fully cover out operating area, thinking of things like remote portable cutblock weather stations. I never thought of using it to monitor the logging trucks. I think, that the potential scope of the project and what it could do for the company, scared them. Looking at the APRS.fi is interesting. Thanks.

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  • What you linked is a rocket stove mass heater. That too is a rocket stove used to heat ones domicile. The original invention of the rocket stove was for cooking as a distinct improvement over the three stone stove. I view the only real problem with the stove in this instructable is that it is not high enough. The higher the stove gives the bigger the draw, which gives a more complete and cleaner burn, like you would get in the article's rocket stove mass heater.

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  • Fantastic Instructable, you have done a great job and what a cool application of the Raspberry Pi Zero. I didn't know there was a Wide-Angle camera out there. For me, that information by itself, makes this Raspberry Pi Instructable #1. I am ordering that camera today. Thank-You.

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  • I like your table. With my daughter I through a table together using those folding legs, for a dinner with family and friends. I now us it as a cutting table. I protect the surface somewhat (yes I have made mistakes) with a sheet of cardboard. I find it easier cutting plywood with a track saw then with a light-weight table saw. The only time I use the light-weight table saw is for ripping lumber.

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  • I haven't used a film camera much since 1983 except for a few weddings where I rented equipment. I haven't been in a darkroom since around 1978. I just recently acquired a Leica 3 (pretty ancient) with the idea of getting back into B&W photography. I thought of going large format but the cost seems too extreme, especially as I will not be earning any money with the camera. 35mm film equipment is easy to come by if one is patient. I just snagged 5 filters for my camera, a grain magnified and a film tank at an auction just the other day for $20. I am starting to see more people using film again. I was a bit concerned with you dumping chemicals down the drain back in the 70s we were very cautious about chemical disposing. Have things changed in that regard with different formulations? T…

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    I haven't used a film camera much since 1983 except for a few weddings where I rented equipment. I haven't been in a darkroom since around 1978. I just recently acquired a Leica 3 (pretty ancient) with the idea of getting back into B&W photography. I thought of going large format but the cost seems too extreme, especially as I will not be earning any money with the camera. 35mm film equipment is easy to come by if one is patient. I just snagged 5 filters for my camera, a grain magnified and a film tank at an auction just the other day for $20. I am starting to see more people using film again. I was a bit concerned with you dumping chemicals down the drain back in the 70s we were very cautious about chemical disposing. Have things changed in that regard with different formulations? Thanks for the instructable.

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  • I always have duct tape in my kit when I cycle tour as it can fix anything but then I am Canadian. I have been using Gorilla tape where I need some repairs to last longer. I heard of using duct tape to remove warts. Sorry guys it does not work. It will soften the excess skin making it easy to remove (debraid) the external wart but the wart virus will remain and it will reappear.

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