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WilkoL

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  • WilkoL commented on WilkoL's instructable Bat Detector
    Bat Detector

    You are correct, R7 is 2k7, fixed in the schematics

    Yes, R7 should be 2k7, fixed. Thanks.

    R7 should be 2k7, not 2.7 ohm.

    100n means 100 nF1n2 means 1.2 nF5k6 means 5.6 kohmIt is just a short way of giving the values of capacitors and resistors (and some other components) that has the added advantage that it is easier to see. On a low resolution screen or copied schematic it can be hard to see the difference between 5.6k and 56k(There was an error with R7, it needs to be 2k7)

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  • WilkoL commented on WilkoL's instructable Bat Detector
    Bat Detector

    I made a small change to the pictures.

    Thanks, I hadn't thought of leaking pipes and detecting wear. I'm going to check a few things here, the lathe and the mill first.

    The 2N2222 will probably work just fine. I used the BC549 because I have a ton of those :-) A 10k potmeter will also work well, you can then turn the amplification a bit lower. A headphone will also work fine, as long as it is one with a low impedance (8 or 16 ohm), I don't know if the LM386 is stable with higher values, the datasheet will tell you. A recorder is probably rather high impedance, so you ma have to add a resistor parallel to it, 10 ohm will do. Good luck.

    Oh, I had removed those power lines because I thought it made the schematics a bit clearer that way. But I changed the pictures a bit with a reference to the total schematic. Hope it helps.Bats in your house! Well I guess it was as scary for you as it was for those poor bats. Thanks for the vote.

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  • WilkoL entered Bat Detector in the Audio Challenge 2020 contest
  • WilkoL commented on WilkoL's instructable Dual Trace Oscilloscope
    Dual Trace Oscilloscope

    It took me quite some time too. I started long, long, long ago with the 6502 in assembly language, stopped for a few years and restarted with the ATTiny series, also in assembly. Then I moved over to the ATMegas and started programming in C. After my brother told me about the STM8 and STM32 microcontrollers I started using those. I just love the interrupt handling of them, the fact that the have DMA and the price of the Nucleo development boards. So you see, it took me a long time too, you'll get there.

    If you take a good look at those signals you'll see that (with good encoders) they produce square waves that are 90 degrees out of phase. When you react (e.g. via interrupt) to the rising (or falling) edge of one signal (A) and look at the value of the other signal (B) at that time, you'll see that it will be low when you rotate in one direction and high if you rotate in the other direction. That is the way I decode them.

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  • WilkoL commented on WilkoL's instructable Dual Trace Oscilloscope
    Dual Trace Oscilloscope

    I just checked with STM32CubeMX, you can only use the STM32F103 on either 48MHz or 72MHz with USB. It'll make the scope somewhat slower and you'll have to recalculate all timer settings. And as a bonus, you'll be withing STMicroelectronics specs again. :-)But if you go the route of another microcontroller why not upgrade to something like a STM32F407 or even faster?I can't help with USB as I don't know anything about it. I'd use the usb-serial converter Nemirtingasis suggests.

    Good idea, I did that with the mini oscilloscope but not with this one. The problems with the rotary encoders are, bounce, the fact that the waveforms coming from it are not even close to 50% duty cycle squarewaves and that I suspect that they are not alligned at all. So the edges from the a and b switches are very close together.They are just horrible. That's the trouble with buying via Ebay, you never know what quality you receive.

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  • WilkoL commented on ellygibson's instructable Paper Map Pinafore Dress
    Paper Map Pinafore Dress

    We have a winner! But don't walk in the rain :-)

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  • WilkoL commented on WilkoL's instructable Dual Trace Oscilloscope
    Dual Trace Oscilloscope

    Sure, the BluePill, the TFT screen, rotary encoders, lithium-ion-charger and the box were bought via Ebay from different sellers, one of my favorites is "kingselectronics15", but I buy from others too.The dual opamp and LDO (HT7333) were bought via Farnell.Some of the other small parts (resistors and capacitors came from Tayda Electronics.And the rest from my "junkbox" that I have been filling for a few decades. E.g. the CD4066 was probably bought in a electronics store here in the Netherlands that sadly has long gone

    Thank you.

    You're welcome.

    Thanks.

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  • WilkoL's instructable Dual Trace Oscilloscope's weekly stats:
    • Dual Trace Oscilloscope
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  • Super Sized Acryllic Spectrum Analyzer

    No need to be sorry, I know how much time producing an instructable takes. Ever since making some of them I admire wirters.And yes, I'm seriously thinking about making one, but I have to talk with my son first about producing all the mechanical parts. I'm not going to do that by hand!

    Awesome, I want one! I'll see if I can have all those parts made (my son's work...)A little explaining about the workings of the hard- and software in the instructable might help E.g. I was wondering what the Si5351 was for until I saw that the MSGEQ7 is a seven channel graphic equalizer, smart. But not everyone will understand that.And.... "onderstel", "toren", a fellow Dutchman? :-)

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  • WilkoL commented on WilkoL's instructable Dual Trace Oscilloscope
    Dual Trace Oscilloscope

    You can simply use the microphone input of a laptop or tablet and possibly also with a phone. Add a small amplifier/attenuator with a single opamp/potentiometer and you're in business. What you then need is a program (app) that simulates an oscilloscope. No doubt there are several. There are other ways of course, e.g. via usb (I have a Picoscope that works that way) but I do not know how to use usb. It is about time I took a look at the ESP32 thing, I haven't done that yet because I have no use for Bluetooth and/or Wifi, but as you say, those thngs are fast (and cheap). I can always just ignore the wireless capabilities :-) I do use Arduino but only for quickly testing new sensors, displays etc. I rarely use Arduino in a final design as I do not like the Arduino "language" ver...

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    You can simply use the microphone input of a laptop or tablet and possibly also with a phone. Add a small amplifier/attenuator with a single opamp/potentiometer and you're in business. What you then need is a program (app) that simulates an oscilloscope. No doubt there are several. There are other ways of course, e.g. via usb (I have a Picoscope that works that way) but I do not know how to use usb. It is about time I took a look at the ESP32 thing, I haven't done that yet because I have no use for Bluetooth and/or Wifi, but as you say, those thngs are fast (and cheap). I can always just ignore the wireless capabilities :-) I do use Arduino but only for quickly testing new sensors, displays etc. I rarely use Arduino in a final design as I do not like the Arduino "language" very much. And it makes the microcontroller so slow.....You say you want to make something for kids that do not have the money for a "real" oscilloscope, my design doesn't cost you an arm and a leg. It's a Blue Pill (€4) a ST7735s LCD (€5), a dual opamp (€1 or 2) some resistors, capacitors and a perfboard (€4 or 5), two rotary encoders (€2) and that's about it. You can put it in a box or not, you can add connectors or simply solder wires to it. And there is also the option of just buying a cheap DSO via Ebay or Aliexpress, but where is the fun in that :-)

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  • WilkoL commented on WilkoL's instructable Dual Trace Oscilloscope
    Dual Trace Oscilloscope

    Hi Tony, that depends :-). The 3.5" lcds I have seen have a resolution of 480x320 meaning larger buffers, slower updating of the display and possibly another display-driver. I wouldn't try it with a STM32F103 (blue pill) but with a faster STM32F407. If the 3.5" lcd has the same connections (SPI) you can just give it a try and see what appears on the screen. If it works (even if it looks weird) it probably means just a bit of tweaking with buffer sizes and calculations. With Arduino you need one with *much* better performance than an UNO or Mini-Pro, but I haven't used any of the "modern" Arduino's so I cannot tell you what would be a good choice. It would mean a rewite of the code (sketch) as you cannot simply recompile it for any Arduino.A 7" display very prob...

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    Hi Tony, that depends :-). The 3.5" lcds I have seen have a resolution of 480x320 meaning larger buffers, slower updating of the display and possibly another display-driver. I wouldn't try it with a STM32F103 (blue pill) but with a faster STM32F407. If the 3.5" lcd has the same connections (SPI) you can just give it a try and see what appears on the screen. If it works (even if it looks weird) it probably means just a bit of tweaking with buffer sizes and calculations. With Arduino you need one with *much* better performance than an UNO or Mini-Pro, but I haven't used any of the "modern" Arduino's so I cannot tell you what would be a good choice. It would mean a rewite of the code (sketch) as you cannot simply recompile it for any Arduino.A 7" display very probably means a Raspberry Pi, but I know that the Pi doesn't have ADCs so you need something like a Blue Pill next to it to do the analog to digital conversion and send that data to the Raspberri Pi. Here it means that apart from some small parts that can be re-used on the Blue Pill you will have to write all software for the Pi and I have virtually no experience with the Pi.

    Thank you.

    Which components are rare? You are right that a video of designing prototyping, building, and testing the result is more instructive, and yes, it is Instructables... you are right about that.But a project like this takes me a few weeks, I make the first design, test it on breadboard, change parts, test it again, and so on. Sometimes the end result does not look like the first design at all. And I always forget to make pictures and videos during this stage. Even during the building on perfboard I often make changes that I do not record.So in the end I have the completed project and because I do not want to have two of them, I do not start over just to make pictures and videos. So yes, you are correct, it would be more instructive, but with most projects I'm not going to do it twice.I do ...

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    Which components are rare? You are right that a video of designing prototyping, building, and testing the result is more instructive, and yes, it is Instructables... you are right about that.But a project like this takes me a few weeks, I make the first design, test it on breadboard, change parts, test it again, and so on. Sometimes the end result does not look like the first design at all. And I always forget to make pictures and videos during this stage. Even during the building on perfboard I often make changes that I do not record.So in the end I have the completed project and because I do not want to have two of them, I do not start over just to make pictures and videos. So yes, you are correct, it would be more instructive, but with most projects I'm not going to do it twice.I do try to explain how and why I do things, such as how triggering works in this oscilloscope.(don't worry about you English, it isn't my first language either)

    You need a faster ADC to go any higher and when you have that you may also want a faster microcontroller. The intention of this oscilloscope was to use a Blue Pill. Because I knew that it has two ADCs I wanted to use those two ADCs to sample with double speed. While that is possible there are some limitations. So I decided to go for a dual channel oscilloscope. From then on, getting the frequency range as high as possible wasn't the most important thing anymore.And even if I had used the two ADCs together, it would only double the frequency range... Maybe there are some clever tricks to go higher in frequency range with the ADCs of this microcontroller but I don't know those tricks, I'm not a professional.Cheers,Wilko

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  • WilkoL commented on Cheesey125's forum topic How to choose an IC?

    It all depends on what you want your circuit to do. But as you clearly are a beginner, start with a 555 and make it blink a led. Later you can add things to it, e.g. a potentiometer to make the rate of blinking variable. Start simpel, and learn from it.

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  • WilkoL commented on AndresR145's instructable LightSound
    LightSound

    Oh this is such a great idea, why didn't I think of that before! I'm absolutely going to try this!

    That phenomenon, and more! Such as ultrasound with my (diy) bat-detector. And I'm thinking (already a long time...) about infra sound, magnetic fields, seismic waves and more.

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  • WilkoL commented on WilkoL's instructable Dual Trace Oscilloscope
    Dual Trace Oscilloscope

    Thanks.

    Well, more like a complete restart... :-) Thanks.

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      • LightSound
      • E-Field Mill
      • The Torsion Wire Magnetoscope
  • Bikelangelo: the Graffiti Maker Bike

    The is great, it's like an old matrix printer! But I'd warn against using anything other than water on public roads, it could cost you a lot for cleaning and perhaps even a fine.

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  • WilkoL followed Audio, LEDs, Microcontrollers, Lighting and 5 others channel
  • WilkoL commented on KarlTorp's instructable Tiny V/A Meter With INA219
    Tiny V/A Meter With INA219

    Let me guess, you have been staring at Table 7 as long as I have :-). In the end I chose to simply ignore it and leave "gain " at 8. The averaging does indeed work although I didn't notice it in the readings, the currents drawn by my microcontrollers are rather stable it seems. But I did see that conversions took longer and shorter with different settings. For averaging I chose 8 giving updates every 4 to 5 ms. I will probably change the shunt resistor back to 0.1 ohm, not because the larger currents but because of the burden voltage. At 100mA and a 1 ohm shunt I lose 100mV, which it rather a lot at 3.3V.

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  • High Resolution Frequency Counter

    It took a while before I understood that you probably meant to say "STM32"... Yes, that's a good idea, but an Arduino is fast enough. The led-display is updated once a second, even an Uno is fast enough for that. Also, the speed of the "SoftSPI" isn't so very high.Why do you want to change the ATTiny2313 code? It will only send information, there is no need to receive anything. What you need to do is to put the Arduino (or STM32) in "slave-mode" and just receive the data every second. You could then do anything you want with it, e.g. you could send it to a pc via the Arduino USB port and enter it into a spreadsheet

    Ah, sure you can. (A better way might be to not code it for the display at all and just send the data out un-encoded.)If you don't want to change anything in the code it would perhaps be a bit more difficult to program it on an Arduino but certainly not impossible. That way you can even keep the display connected.Take a good look at the MAX7219_shownumber() function, you'll see that it is pretty simple. It sends out the digits (1 .. 7) one by one, followed by the number (0 .. 9) that needs to be displayed on it. Good luck!

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  • High Resolution Frequency Counter

    I'm afraid that will not be easy with an attiny2313. The code fills almost all available flash memory. And the mcu is very busy so there is little time left for any extra jobs. But you can try... And you can always make a similar counter with a more capable mcu.Wilko

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  • DIY Function Generator With STC MCU Easily

    Have a look at my sinewave (and cosinewave) generator for some hints and tips :-)https://www.instructables.com/id/Sinewave-and-Cosinewave-Signal-Generator/

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  • Upgrade DIY Mini DSO to a Real Oscilloscope With Awesome Features

    Thanks for your reply. I'll have another good look at the GetTriggerPos, but I was actually hoping you could give a short explanation in words about the method. In my DSO the triggerpoint is found by comparing the measured value with the wanted trigger level. When such a point is found, the next level in the array is checked whether it is higher or lower than the former, if it is higher the triggerpoint is found.I have the triggerposition in the beginning of the screen (like it is/was on analog oscilloscopes). Putting it in the middle is a very smart trick!

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  • WilkoL commented on KarlTorp's instructable Tiny V/A Meter With INA219
    Tiny V/A Meter With INA219

    Yesterday I did a lot of experimenting with different GAIN and AVERAGE settings. I cannot say that I notice a lot of difference between those settings. In the end I settled for a GAIN of /8 and an AVERAGE of 8. (resolution 12bit)Do you notice any differences?

    What I meant with "even smaller" wasn't the project box but the microcontroller. But soon it became clear that an attiny13 or even an attiny10 wouldn't be capable of running the code. So the attiny85 it was. It runs on an old Nokia battery, power is switched on and off with the single button, it has not other functions. When you leave it switched on it will power down after 5 minutes. At power up it shows the battery voltage for 5 seconds before the main program starts.The 0.1 ohm resistor is replaced with a 1 ohm, that means I can measure up to 320mA which is far more than most of my projects use and the advantage is that the resolution is 10 times as high. The project box is 80 x 50 x 25 mm, so it isn't all that big :-) And I even managed to put in a lithium ion charger. Now...

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    What I meant with "even smaller" wasn't the project box but the microcontroller. But soon it became clear that an attiny13 or even an attiny10 wouldn't be capable of running the code. So the attiny85 it was. It runs on an old Nokia battery, power is switched on and off with the single button, it has not other functions. When you leave it switched on it will power down after 5 minutes. At power up it shows the battery voltage for 5 seconds before the main program starts.The 0.1 ohm resistor is replaced with a 1 ohm, that means I can measure up to 320mA which is far more than most of my projects use and the advantage is that the resolution is 10 times as high. The project box is 80 x 50 x 25 mm, so it isn't all that big :-) And I even managed to put in a lithium ion charger. Now all that is left is to make some holes in the cover, not something I'm very good at, so I'll spare you the result of that...

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  • WilkoL commented on WilkoL's instructable Mini Oscilloscope
    Mini Oscilloscope

    Yes you can. When I started this project I did think of using the STM32F103, as it is faster, has more memory (flash and ram) and even better, it has two ADCs that can be used "interleaved" making the sampling twice as fast. But I chose the STM32F030 *because* it is smaller. :-)And in the end I still had enough flash and ram, and even one pin left!

    Thanks.

    Thanks for the link. No I didn't know about him and so there is no connection between the two projects. That said, I did think about using a "Blue Pill" as it has two ADCs that you can use interleaved....The reason I build this mini oscilloscope was an article I saw on www.dangerousprototypes.com and I liked his idea of a mini oscilloscope but wanted to make one as simple as possible, he uses an atmega328 and a separate ADC as the ADC of the 328 is rather slow. There is another (quite recent) diy oscilloscope on Instructables where the builder uses a STC microcontroller. Have a look, he did a great job.

    That's odd, I just tried it on another pc, where I did not log in on Instructables and could download files without any problems. Which file(s) give you problems?( Instructables unfortunalely does not allow zip and rar files anymore, I tried to put all code in one file but was unable to upload it)

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  • Upgrade DIY Mini DSO to a Real Oscilloscope With Awesome Features

    Hi Lau,Recently I also made a mini oscilloscope ( https://www.instructables.com/id/Mini-Oscilloscop... ). Just a few days later a saw you DSO project (1 and 2) . I wonder if you can tell me how you did triggering. I tried to read your code, but as I cannot read the comments (I'm rom the Netherlands and I can only read Dutch, English and some German) I could not figure out how you did it. It looks very stable, where as my solution is not all that stable.About negative voltages, take a look at my project, just one simple opamp and an offset (made with pwm) fixes that.Cheers,Wilko

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  • WilkoL commented on KarlTorp's instructable Tiny V/A Meter With INA219
    Tiny V/A Meter With INA219

    In the past I made one with the INA3221 and a Nokia lcd. It has three inputs and I put different resistors on those inputs, giving me three different ranges. But the thing is rather big. Now I'm going to try to make your design with an attiny85 or perhaps even smaller.

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  • Sinewave and Cosinewave Signal Generator

    At first, sorry for not speaking Spanish, I had to use google-translate to read your question but I will not try to translate my answer back into Spanish.Well, I do not see a back plate anywhere in the pictures and I don't think you meant the LCD so I'm guessing that you refer to part of a laptop in the top of the second small picture next to the STM32. Is that it?

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  • High Resolution Frequency Counter

    F_CPU redefined is just a warning, it means that the clock frequency was defined somewhere earlier. I usually put it in the symbols for the preprocessor and leave it out of main.cThe error that the declaration of the for loop does not adhere to C99 probably means that the compiler doesn't like the line:for (uint8_t i=0; i<16; i++)Move the declaration of i to the top of the function so that it looks like this:void soft_spi_16(uint16_t data){uint8_t i = 0; SPI_PORT &= ~(1 << SPI_CE); //set CE low for (i=0; i<16; i++) {...............

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  • High Resolution Frequency Counter

    The TIMSK register does not exist with the ATMEGA328, so I guess you are using an Arduino with this microcontroller, not a board with an ATTINY2313. In a mega328 there are two registers TIMSK0 for TIMER0 and TIMSK1 for TIMER1 .You can get the code working by reading the datasheets of both the tiny2313 and the mega328 and making the neccesary changes.

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  • High Resolution Frequency Counter

    If you give some more information, someone might...What are the errors. What IDE do you use (compiler). Etc.

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  • WilkoL commented on WilkoL's instructable Tuning Fork Clock
    Tuning Fork Clock

    As it is, a little less than 300mA at 5V. When you put some more effort in it, I guess it is possible to run it with 100mA at 5V. The coil uses most of the power, a better coil will help. The rest of the circuit uses just a few mA.

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  • High Resolution Frequency Counter

    Hello Ajijul,That's very difficult without your code, but I guess that it has to do with the interrupt of TIMER0 that claims so much of the processor time that the UART interrupts start to interfere with it.

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  • High Resolution Frequency Counter

    Good to hear. Although I have never used Eagle and am just now starting with Kicad, I'd like to see the Eagle file(s). It is always good to learn how other people design a pcb, esspecially for a beginner like I am. And if you can also send the HEX file, I'll add both to the Instructable.Where pcb-fab did you use? Or did you develop and etch it yourself?

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  • WilkoL commented on WilkoL's instructable Tuning Fork Oscillator
    Tuning Fork Oscillator

    Take a look over here:https://www.instructables.com/id/Tuning-Fork-Clock/

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  • How to Make a Pastry Cake | Nevada Basque Cake

    oh now I see my mistake, it didN'T go to waste

    "half the cream went to waste"Well, my son would dispute that, he thought it went very well with his yogurt ;-)

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  • Programming Microcontrollers With a USBasp Programmer in Atmel Studio

    It works well and it is fast! Faster than programming with my original, not a clone, AVR_ISP_mkII. Oh, and I removed the tick at the "Prompt for arguments" Now all I have to find out is how to read and write the Fuses and Lockbits with avrdude.

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