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WilkoL

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  • Setup ST Visual Develop With the Cosmic STM8 Compiler

    What errors do you get? Are the files set to Read-Only for some reason?

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  • WilkoL commented on WilkoL's instructable Bat Detector
    Bat Detector

    It doesn't matter what capacitors you use, the type and even the exact values are not critical, ceramics are fine. I used ceramics too. The same is true for the resistors and even the transistors, use what types you have lying around. But there is one critical thing and that is the microphone. Not all microphones "hear" the frequencies used by bats. It may take a bit of experimenting with different types. Wiggle a bunch of keys in front of the microphone, it should produce quite some noise.Succes,Wilko

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  • Tater Tot Breakfast Casserole

    This actually is dinner, right?

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  • WilkoL commented on WilkoL's instructable Dual Trace Oscilloscope
    Dual Trace Oscilloscope

    Hi Freddy,I just made an absolute minimum setup, just the blue-pill and the lcd-screen. Made the connections to the lcd and put 1/3 and 2/3 of the 3.3V on the inputs of the ADCs. After uploading the code it worked first time. I'll upload the HEX-file that I used again to Gitlab, maybe something went wrong there.Another thing could be that the input voltage on the ADCs of your oscilloscope is higher (or lower) than you expect. What happens when you put no signal at all on PA0 and PA1?Happy debugging,Wilko

    I've been reading about the STM32F103 clones: some are marked CF32, others CS32 and there are even microcontrollers that are not clones at all. I stopped buying any electronic components from China about a year ago. Even a simple 3.3V voltage regulator I received from China was fake, it didn't have overload protection.... boom!Farnell, Mouser and others may be a bit more expensive but at least you know that you get genuine parts.

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  • WilkoL commented on WilkoL's instructable Dual Trace Oscilloscope
    Dual Trace Oscilloscope

    Hi Freddy,What do you mean with CH32 ? Didn't you get a real STM32F103 ? I know that there are Chinese clones of the STM32F103 made by Giga Devices but they are called GD32F103... I do not know if they are 100% compatible, so if you have one of those microcontrollers it *could* be the problem. I will build the oscilloscope again on a breadboard to see if I can replicate the effect you see (no line). But it will take some time to build so you may have to wait a while before I have build and tested it.Succes with the hobby!Wilko

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  • WilkoL made the instructable Sheepherder’s Bake
    Sheepherder’s Bake

    But not with 7 eggs! :-) I live (and eat) alone so I reduced all ingredients so it was enough for one person. This time it deep fryed the potato cubes, next time I'll try to roast them, less fatty.

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  • WilkoL commented on Donnalteris's instructable Sheepherder’s Bake
    Sheepherder’s Bake

    You eat this for breakfast? I'm going to try this for dinner! And yes, it look great.

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  • WilkoL commented on WilkoL's instructable Dual Trace Oscilloscope
    Dual Trace Oscilloscope

    Hi Freddy,It is hard for me to decide what might be wrong with your device and the fact that I do not have my dual trace oscilloscope anymore makes it even harder. I can only guess at what causes the line to be invisible or not working at all.I took a good look at the code and I can see nothing that prevents the line to be shown, also I know that others have used the hex-file and got a working device. So my guess is that there is nothing wrong with the hex file. Now you say that the "menu" does appear, that means that the microcontroller is working well and that everything is connected as it should... I can only think of one thing, that the color of the line is a color the for some reason does not work on your display. If you have an other display, try that one....I'm sorry that…

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    Hi Freddy,It is hard for me to decide what might be wrong with your device and the fact that I do not have my dual trace oscilloscope anymore makes it even harder. I can only guess at what causes the line to be invisible or not working at all.I took a good look at the code and I can see nothing that prevents the line to be shown, also I know that others have used the hex-file and got a working device. So my guess is that there is nothing wrong with the hex file. Now you say that the "menu" does appear, that means that the microcontroller is working well and that everything is connected as it should... I can only think of one thing, that the color of the line is a color the for some reason does not work on your display. If you have an other display, try that one....I'm sorry that I cannot help you more than this. Seeing that your language is Spanish means that you are most likely not close to me (the Netherlands in Europe) so it probably isn't possible to help you in person.Kind regards,Wilko

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  • WilkoL commented on WilkoL's instructable Dual Trace Oscilloscope
    Dual Trace Oscilloscope

    First of all, I do not have the oscilloscope anymore so I'm not able to test things. But I think it is possible to get a bit more performance out of the STM32F103. The first thing I'd try is to simply add a 13th option to the timebase (see stm32f1xx_it.c) and give it a value of 18. So add:case 13:LL_TIM_SetPrescaler(TIM3, 0);LL_TIM_SetAutoReload(TIM3, 18);break; to it.(and make sure that the value of timebase is allowed to go up to 13 of course)That would make the timebase 5.0667 us/div which is close enough.Next you might need to change the clock for the ADCs from 30MHz to 60MHz by changing the line LL_RCC_SetADCClockSource(LL_RCC_ADC_CLKSRC_PCLK2_DIV_4);(in the main.c file) to LL_RCC_SetADCClockSource(LL_RCC_ADC_CLKSRC_PCLK2_DIV_2);That did work on the STM32F103 I used but there is no g…

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    First of all, I do not have the oscilloscope anymore so I'm not able to test things. But I think it is possible to get a bit more performance out of the STM32F103. The first thing I'd try is to simply add a 13th option to the timebase (see stm32f1xx_it.c) and give it a value of 18. So add:case 13:LL_TIM_SetPrescaler(TIM3, 0);LL_TIM_SetAutoReload(TIM3, 18);break; to it.(and make sure that the value of timebase is allowed to go up to 13 of course)That would make the timebase 5.0667 us/div which is close enough.Next you might need to change the clock for the ADCs from 30MHz to 60MHz by changing the line LL_RCC_SetADCClockSource(LL_RCC_ADC_CLKSRC_PCLK2_DIV_4);(in the main.c file) to LL_RCC_SetADCClockSource(LL_RCC_ADC_CLKSRC_PCLK2_DIV_2);That did work on the STM32F103 I used but there is no guarantee....But I'm not sure that the rest of the STM32F103 can keep up with that speed. It may be necessary to go a bit further with over clocking it. As I said in the Instructable, I could make it run reliable at 156 MHz. If you do that you will have to re-calculate all timings of the oscilloscope because everything is based on a 120 MHz clock.This all does not change the bandwidth of the oscilloscope of course and remember that even running the microcontroller at 120MHz is already way out of spec.Good luck.

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  • High Resolution Frequency Counter

    Well, I'm not an experienced user of Gitlab, I just use it to post code and some other information, so I have no idea what causes the spam-message.Just post the info here, as you did :-)I'll take a look at it.. and see if I can replicate the issue. It may take a while though, I'm somewhat busy with other things (not related to electronics)

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  • WilkoL followed zanod
  • Audio Range Frequency Generator

    Very interesting. Do you have the code as well?

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  • Clock Generator With Si5351 and Blue Pill

    "stratospheric programmers and their poems" hahahaha!Upload the text code only or even better write an instructable about the project. About those stratospherics... I do have a Rubidium frequency standard, a GPS locked signal generator, a GPS locked frequency counter and a DCF77 linked clock. Sometimes I'm a so called "time-nerd".

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  • Clock Generator With Si5351 and Blue Pill

    Good to hear, what are you building with it?Happy coding,Wilko

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  • WilkoL commented on WilkoL's instructable Dual Trace Oscilloscope
    Dual Trace Oscilloscope

    Most likely you can use it, take a look at the connections though. The LCD I used is one with SPI and I know there are others that use I2C. If the LCD you mention is one with I2C you need to change quite a lot in the code.The increase in resolution means that the microcontroller has more work to do, so it will slow it down somewhat. Happy building.

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  • WilkoL commented on WilkoL's instructable Light to Sound Convertor
    Light to Sound Convertor

    There are (at least) two types of those piezo buzzers. One type will produce a beep on its own when you put a voltage on it. Those will not work. The other type will react to the voltage applied to it. They might work but I don't think the sound will be very loud and they will work best on higher frequencies (> 250 Hz) , the 50 Hz mains hum, (or 60 Hz if you're in the US) will probably not be audible.

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  • WilkoL commented on Jietse Vanlandschoot's instructable Meeuw
    Meeuw

    Grappig project!

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  • WilkoL commented on WilkoL's instructable Light to Sound Convertor
    Light to Sound Convertor

    Sure you can add a speaker. You'll need an amplifier such as a LM386 to have enough volume though. It will also mean that you will have to replace the CR2032 button cell with something more powerful. Two AA batteries might not be enough for the LM386 as it needs at least 4V. And with the MCP6002 you shouldn't go higher than 6V so three to four AA batteries will do the job.

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  • WilkoL commented on WilkoL's instructable Bat Detector
    Bat Detector

    Hmmm, I have never thought about that. Well, if I take a look at the schematic of an electret microphone (see the picture, stolen from wikipedia :-) ) I see no reason why it isn't possible. But whether it improves the reception of sound is another question. What is your plan? Pointing both in the same direction, it might improve the sensitivity, but if you want to point one to the left and the other to the right, it may reduce the sensitivity of both microphones. But by all means, try it! And tell us about the results.

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  • WilkoL commented on WilkoL's instructable Bat Detector
    Bat Detector

    What do you mean with "reverse" transistors? They are all npn transistors where the collector needs to be on the positive side, the emitter on the negative side and the base should be (usually) somewhat in between. Actually the base will always be around 0.7volt more positive than the emitter.

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  • WilkoL commented on cookwewill's instructable Hungarian Beef Goulash
    Hungarian Beef Goulash

    Ten! Can it be made for just one or two? I guess I'd have to drink the rest of the beer :-)

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  • WilkoL commented on WilkoL's instructable Bat Detector
    Bat Detector

    First, sorry it took so long, I've been away for some time. No C4 and C5 are part of the high-pass filter. If you use those values it will pass much lower frequencies too and you don't want that. Stick to the values in the schematic. They are cheap ceramic capacitors.

    That's odd. Did you place the C13 capactor in the wrong direction perhaps?

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  • Frequency Counter With Variable Gate Time

    First, sorry it took so long, I've been away for some time. The IOC file is now available in the GitLab folder. But I'm not sure if it is the correct one, it wasn't in the original folder anymore so it may be an old one.Good luck.

    First, sorry it took so long, I've been away for some time. Did you set the PC13 pin to output? Something like this:GPIO_InitStruct.Pin = LL_GPIO_PIN_13; //ledGPIO_InitStruct.Mode = LL_GPIO_MODE_ GPIO_InitStruct.Speed = LL_GPIO_SPEED_FREQ_LOW; GPIO_InitStruct.OutputType = LL_GPIO_OUTPUT_PUSHPULL; LL_GPIO_Init(GPIOC, &GPIO_InitStruct);

    Ah, good to hear, so you can ignore the other answer :-)

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  • Cranberry White Chocolate Cookies

    Succes! This time my cookies didn't melt into one giant-cookie in the oven. I had to use much more flour and put the cookies almost twice as long in the oven. But just look at those beauties! I made 32 cookies and I wonder if they will survive this weekend :-)

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  • Sinewave and Cosinewave Signal Generator

    I took a look at the 4423 and It is very interesting.But, you know there always is this but. The max frequency of it is 5 kHz, my generator goes up to 1 MHz. You set the frequency by setting (or selecting) resistors, what if you want to produce 440.01 Hz? You will need very precise resistors and a frequency counter. Of course my generator also needs a display, but with a microcontroller that's easy.A 741. Really? I used the last 741 many decades ago.For the 4423 is will be good enough as it doesn't go higher than 5 kHz, but come on, there are so many better opamps.Then there are good reasons for taking the "hard" way, the first is that I do not have a 4423 handy but I do have microcontrollers in stock, the second reason might be versatility, if I need another waveform, I can sim…

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    I took a look at the 4423 and It is very interesting.But, you know there always is this but. The max frequency of it is 5 kHz, my generator goes up to 1 MHz. You set the frequency by setting (or selecting) resistors, what if you want to produce 440.01 Hz? You will need very precise resistors and a frequency counter. Of course my generator also needs a display, but with a microcontroller that's easy.A 741. Really? I used the last 741 many decades ago.For the 4423 is will be good enough as it doesn't go higher than 5 kHz, but come on, there are so many better opamps.Then there are good reasons for taking the "hard" way, the first is that I do not have a 4423 handy but I do have microcontrollers in stock, the second reason might be versatility, if I need another waveform, I can simply change the code, if I decide to make the phase shift variable, change some more code. (I ve actually done that)But the most important reason is that I like making things myself. Instead of building this device or using a 4423 you could also just go the the store and buy an arbitrary waveform generator, but what fun is that?Do write an Instructable, with whatever devices you have, I'm always looking forward to such articles.Cheers, Wilko

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  • WilkoL made the instructable Black Forest Cherry Cookies
    Black Forest Cherry Cookies

    But I failed :-) The dough sagged into one huge cookie and it is still rather soft. What did I do wrong? I converted all cups and spoon into grams, but during the mixing I already thought that the dough was rather liquid so I added quite a lot of extra flour.I used half of the dough and made 16 balls, added the cherry preserve (called jam in Dutch) and put it in the oven at 180 degrees Celsius. One a second tray I did that same with the other half of the dough.After 10 minutes it had all melted into one super-cookie and it was very liquid, so I left it in the oven for another 10 minutes before I took it out.After cooling (2 hours) I cut the super-cookie into 16 pieces. And even now they are quite soft. Are they supposed to be soft? Cookies in the Netherlands usually are crunchy...Luckily …

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    But I failed :-) The dough sagged into one huge cookie and it is still rather soft. What did I do wrong? I converted all cups and spoon into grams, but during the mixing I already thought that the dough was rather liquid so I added quite a lot of extra flour.I used half of the dough and made 16 balls, added the cherry preserve (called jam in Dutch) and put it in the oven at 180 degrees Celsius. One a second tray I did that same with the other half of the dough.After 10 minutes it had all melted into one super-cookie and it was very liquid, so I left it in the oven for another 10 minutes before I took it out.After cooling (2 hours) I cut the super-cookie into 16 pieces. And even now they are quite soft. Are they supposed to be soft? Cookies in the Netherlands usually are crunchy...Luckily they are very tasty. :-) They probably won't last more than a few days (children.... you know).

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  • USBASP Installation in Windows 10

    Met pensioen en toen was er de USBASP om mee te spelen. :-)

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  • "Long Earth" Stepper Night Light

    Thank you so very very much! I didn't know about The Long Earth books by Terry Pratchett and Stephen Baxter. And to think I have read the entire Discworld series several times... I didn't know... shaking my head.... I did not know!Thank you, thank you!

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  • WilkoL commented on Frugha's instructable Common IC Breadboard Clock
    Common IC Breadboard Clock

    Beautiful construction, my breadboards never look that pretty. And you even gave me a nice idea that I have never thought of: put a 2 Hz signal on one side of the buttons. Why didn't I think of that!

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  • WilkoL commented on Josehf Murchison's instructable Tube Converter
    Tube Converter

    Nice work! And good to see such a beautiful scope being brought back to life. Can you tell more about how you made the part with the nine pins? It almost looks like it was made of wood, but in the text you say it was made with a nine-pin-socket and nine pins. How did you do that?

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  • Computing With (really) Very Big Numbers

    For even bigger numbers take a look at the video's of Numberphile on youtube:Graham's Number: TREE(3):Do not try to compute these numbers either on your computer or in your head, they have this warning:Graham's Number: A number so epic it will collapse your brain into a black hole! Yet Tony Padilla and Matt Parker take the risk of discussing its magnitude. Watch with caution.

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  • Peanut Butter Chocolate Chips Cookies

    They are still cooling down, so I haven't tasted them yet, but I'm absolutely sure they will be great. The dough was :-) As usual I had to translate the cups and spoons into metric grams and doing that I saw that it would be a lot. It was more than I 'm used to and I had to fill two baking sheets. That also meant that I had to stack the baking sheets above one and other. In the picture they look like meatballs :-) The top baking sheet therefore got more heat and I had to open the oven halfway to swap them. I think that the sheet that was on top first is the reason that those cookies spread out more than the others. Oh and because I could not find chocolate chips, used two bars of chocolate one called pure-chocolate, the other milk-chocolate that I chopped into pieces.

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  • WilkoL commented on quantumwhisperer's instructable Contact Mic
    Contact Mic

    Yes it is clear now, and it makes sense too, the inductor's mass "resists" movement so the vibrations of the surface change the coil even more.(about those thousand words... I do prefer a reference manual of a micro controller above a picture of it :-) )

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  • WilkoL commented on quantumwhisperer's instructable Contact Mic
    Contact Mic

    How do you connect the microphone to a music instrument? Do you glue the inductor to it and let the spring hang freely in the air or let the spring touch it (but then to what is the inductor fixed to?)Or, for my understanding, can you show a picture of the device in action? From the video it is not very clear (to me) what is connected to what.

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  • WilkoL commented on quantumwhisperer's instructable Contact Mic
    Contact Mic

    Interesting! Recording the (probably very small) changes in the magnetic field with a coil that produced it in the first place. What do you use it for? What frequencies is it (most) sensitive to?

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  • WilkoL commented on WilkoL's instructable Bat Detector
    Bat Detector

    I see, so you want to skip the microphone that probably doesn't work much above 20 kHz. But my guess is that there will still be a low pass filter to remove everything above 20 kHz in electronics. If they do not do that there will be problems with aliasing, esspecially with the 44 kHz sample rate. Yes, the maximum frequency you can faithfully record is always half the sample rate, because of Nyquist–Shannon. It may work if there isn't too much low pass filtering in electronics and it could be that the Nyquist effect even makes bat sounds audible. Try it.

    As I had no idea of what a Zoom H1N was, I checked it out. It looks nice. About your question, the thing clearly is meant to record human audible audio so I guess it will not record much when you feed it with bat-sounds at 40 kHz or higher. That said, maybe it will do something as it can record mp3 with sample rates of 44.1, 48, or 96 kHz. You may end up with a heterodyne bat detector. Just give it a go and seen what happens.

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  • WilkoL commented on Fusebot's instructable Matrix-Tree
    Matrix-Tree

    Well done. And I like the mix of "arduino-language" and direct register code :-)

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  • WilkoL commented on WilkoL's instructable Bat Detector
    Bat Detector

    When I read about the Dell powersupply I thought you meant that you used it AS a power supply. The pictures explained it, hahaha! The video is great, at the end you can hear a bat zooming in on an insect. A switch to choose between division ratios is probably a good idea, but when you can still hear up to 10 kHz it may not be neccesary. I can't hear anything higher than 4 kHz so I need higher division rates. Anyway, thank you for showing your detector and have fun listening.Wilko

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  • WilkoL commented on WilkoL's instructable Dual Trace Oscilloscope
    Dual Trace Oscilloscope

    Any low voltage and somewhat fast dual opamp will do. So a MCP6022, LMV722, OPA2316 or a LM6132 and many others are fine. Search for a Dual opamp, 5 to 10 MHz gain-bandwidth, 1.7V to 10V and not too expensive :-) A high slewrate is also nice to have.

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  • WilkoL followed ai0xuexi
      • How to Design and Build a MPPT Solar Charger Using Arduino
  • WilkoL commented on WilkoL's instructable Bat Detector
    Bat Detector

    A layout for a circuit is a schematic... isn't it? Are you making a wooden frame for all the components? Isn't that much harder than making a pcb?

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  • USBASP Installation in Windows 10

    Well, that's odd! I had to use "WinUSB (v6.1.7600.16385)" to get the USBASP working with the Arduino software (on Windows 10 x64). With other options Arduino claimed that there was no USBASP connected.In Device_Manager it now shows up under the Universal Serial Bus devices.

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  • WilkoL commented on WilkoL's instructable Bat Detector
    Bat Detector

    That should work, the CD4040 and LM386 both can work with up to 15V resp. 12V so 9V shouldn't be a problem. You might want to keep an eye on the current drawn from the battery, if that is very high it will drain the battery in no-time.

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  • 88888: the Electronic Smile Counter

    I'll have a look at that too, thanks. Only in my case it isn't eeprom but flash memory as I'm using STM32 microcontrollers and sadly, most do not have eeprom on board.

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  • 88888: the Electronic Smile Counter

    Nice implementation of wear leveling. I'm going to do that in my frequency counter that has its timebase, made with a 10MHz OCXO locked to the 1 pulse per second of a GPS receiver. The OCXO gets a voltage from a DAC so it is tuned to 10MHz exactly. The value of the DAC at this moment is saved (every few hours) to flash but without any wear leveling. Your idea will make the flash last much longer.

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  • WilkoL commented on WilkoL's instructable Bat Detector
    Bat Detector

    Hi Lanius,The way I transfer a circuit from the breadboard to a perfboard is quite simple. I keep following the schematic when I place the components on the board. Only when I see that it gets too big or if there is a better way of placing the parts I change the layout.There are some rules to follow, for instance the crystal for a microcontroller needs to be very close to the microcontroller. When you have analog signals, try not to have digital lines coming close. If there are parts that get hot, place them at the edge of the board so that you can attach a heatsink and do not place electrolytic capacitors close to parts that get hot.When I am happy with the layout I solder the parts and start with the connections. With (low level) analog signals, I start with those analog connections, t…

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    Hi Lanius,The way I transfer a circuit from the breadboard to a perfboard is quite simple. I keep following the schematic when I place the components on the board. Only when I see that it gets too big or if there is a better way of placing the parts I change the layout.There are some rules to follow, for instance the crystal for a microcontroller needs to be very close to the microcontroller. When you have analog signals, try not to have digital lines coming close. If there are parts that get hot, place them at the edge of the board so that you can attach a heatsink and do not place electrolytic capacitors close to parts that get hot.When I am happy with the layout I solder the parts and start with the connections. With (low level) analog signals, I start with those analog connections, trying to keep them as short as possible. Next are the ground connections. With a (mostly) digital design I start with ground and other power lines, followed with digital signals. If possible I place all ICs in sockets and leave the ICs out until I have checked the power connections. Then I apply power to the board and measure the voltages at the pins for the ICs. Only when I see that those are okay, I will power off, place the ICs and reapply power. Usually I start with a lab-power-supply set to the correct voltage and the current-limit set to (what I think) is the expected supply current.Happy experimentingPictures of the bat-detector, top and bottom

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  • WilkoL commented on WilkoL's instructable CharliePlexing on a ATTINY10
    CharliePlexing on a ATTINY10

    Hello Hhwill,The IDE I use for all Atmel/Microchip microcontrollers is Atmel Studio 7. You can download it for free from Microchip. The programmer is an official AVR-ISP-MKII, I don't think you can still buy the official one and I don't know how well the clones from China will work. It should also work with an USBASP, see there for connections: http://www.technoblogy.com/show?1YQY I have made the USBASP work in Atmel Studio 7 once, but at the moment I don't remember how I did that. It was something with the "external-tools" and I later removed that because it interfered with the workings of the AVR_IPS-MKII. A google-search for "atmel studio usbasp" will probably do the trick.Remember that to program the ATTINY10 it needs to be powered with 5V ! You can use it with low…

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    Hello Hhwill,The IDE I use for all Atmel/Microchip microcontrollers is Atmel Studio 7. You can download it for free from Microchip. The programmer is an official AVR-ISP-MKII, I don't think you can still buy the official one and I don't know how well the clones from China will work. It should also work with an USBASP, see there for connections: http://www.technoblogy.com/show?1YQY I have made the USBASP work in Atmel Studio 7 once, but at the moment I don't remember how I did that. It was something with the "external-tools" and I later removed that because it interfered with the workings of the AVR_IPS-MKII. A google-search for "atmel studio usbasp" will probably do the trick.Remember that to program the ATTINY10 it needs to be powered with 5V ! You can use it with lower voltages, but programming must be with 5V.Succes,Wilko

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  • Make Professional Looking Front Panels for Your Next DIY Project

    I sure did make it, a very small one. I'll present it in an Ibstructable that will be posted shortly.

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  • WilkoL commented on WilkoL's instructable Aura Remover
    Aura Remover

    If you believe in the kind of nonsense that is an aura or Bill Gates injecting you via a vaccin and then controlling you through G5, it is very serious. But for normal people ( probably you too :-) ) it is all a joke.

    Well... it's a device that produces UV pulses and some WIFI signal. I made it because there are those people who believe that WIFI radiation is bad for your (spiritual) health, G5 phones are bad, etc. My ex is one of those, she even believes in angels, homeopathy and preventing cancer by eating vegables. (probably now she is a Qanon-no-no follower). To tease her I made a device that every once in a while produces just those things and made up a story about scientists and professors. Just as she used to do when talking about homeopath, dangers about vaccins and more...

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  • WilkoL commented on JeremySCook's instructable Bike Wheel Light PCB
    Bike Wheel Light PCB

    Nice idea, although I'm afraid that in the environment here it will not last very long (rain, snow, salt, mud). How about powering such a device with a coil on the PCB and a magnet attached to the frame?

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  • WilkoL commented on nqtronix's instructable Light Probe MK I
    Light Probe MK I

    In the meantime I found that this sensor is most sensitive to blue light and responds less to green and red. I'll see if I can find another one. I have had some fun pointing it to a led display (MAX7219 with 4 digits) where it is very visible that the digits are in a matrix. I even had some surprises, when I shone light from a bicycle led-lamp to it, it proved to be pulsed, even on the brightest level. My LED lighting is less constant than I thought it was, the 100Hz ripple is very visible. I have thought about adding some functionality, such as an AC setting, audio output and variable amplification. And maybe next time I'll feed the opamp +3V and -3V (instead of 0V and +6V), that way I can even increase the bias for the photo diode to -6V or use one battery less...

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  • WilkoL made the instructable Light Probe MK I
    Light Probe MK I

    Well.... I made this with your device as inspriration. First of all I made it with through hole components, except for the dual opamp and photo diode. As I didn't have such a nice photo diode, I used a "ambient light sensor" with a huge capacity (134pF at 0V). But to my surprise I can detect light pulses of 1us, made with a led fed with 5mA pulses. This photo diode can handle no more than 16V reverse voltage, which was no problem for me as I intended to feed the probe with CR2032 button cells :-)See here the results:

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  • Variable Capacitor for a Crystal Set

    Oh, I have to ask my son about galena, he collected minerals for some time, he might have it too. If he has I'm going to try making a diode with it. I have made crystal radios too, long, long ago, but always with germanium diodes. I did however once made a special antenna for one, I had a few hundred meters of wire (aluminium if I recall correctly) and tied it to a kite (another hobby). I don't remember how high it went but the voltage (analog meter) was pretty spectaculair. So high that I didn't dare connect my crystal earphone to it...

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  • WilkoL commented on WilkoL's instructable Big Seven Segment Display
    Big Seven Segment Display

    Well, the capacity of the LEDs I used (J5630 from Cree) is approx 340pF. But that is when used with reverse polarity. I don't know if there is any capactity left when one uses them with a forward current. (silly idea: use the LEDs as varicaps :-), it might work...)But I did an experiment with my pulse -generator (other instructable) and I can confirm that even at a current of 5mA pulses of 500ns at a frequency of 1kHz is still visible as a low intensity glowIn total darkness even single pulses (1 Hz) of 500ns at 5mA can be seen. Shorter pulses are no longer visible (for me). I haven't tried it with higher currents.

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  • Variable Capacitor for a Crystal Set

    Oh, I love the point-contact diode! What material is it made of?

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  • WilkoL commented on WilkoL's instructable Big Seven Segment Display
    Big Seven Segment Display

    The apparent brightness is also the reason I chose to use a Sigmoid curve (exponential-ish) to increase and decrease the brightness. Eyes are very sensitive al low light levels. I've been told that someone with good eyesight, after adapting to total darkness, can detect a single photon...I have been experimenting with green LEDs at very low currents, I have a couple of 3mm LEDs that are still quite well visible at 1 uA (indoors). So yes, being able to see LEDs glow at normal currents with pulses of 1 us seems very likely to me.

    The apparent brightness is also the reason I chose to use a Sigmoid curve (exponential-ish) to increase and decrease the brightness. Eyes are very sensitive al low light levels. I've been told that someone with good eyesight, after adapting to total darkness, can detect a single photon...I have been experimenting with green LEDs at very low currents, I have a couple of 3mm LEDs that are still quite well visible at 1 uA (indoors). So yes, being able to see LEDs glow at normal currents with pulses of 1 us seems very likely to me.

    The apparent brightness is also the reason I chose to use a Sigmoid curve (exponential-ish) to increase and decrease the brightness. Eyes are very sensitive al low light levels. I've been told that someone with good eyesight, after adapting to total darkness, can detect a single photon...I have been experimenting with green LEDs at very low currents, I have a couple of 3mm LEDs that are still quite well visible at 1 uA (indoors). So yes, being able to see LEDs glow at normal currents with pulses of 1 us seems very likely to me.

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  • WilkoL commented on WilkoL's instructable Big Seven Segment Display
    Big Seven Segment Display

    First: Instructables is VERY slow with sending notifications, I received an email about your reply on the 28th of Januari!Hmmm, I have never thought about capacitance of LEDs and the effects of that... Some time ago there was an optical oscilloscope probe on Instructables, this is a good reason to have another look at it and build it. With it one can see how long LEDs stays lit after current to it has stopped. I wonder if all LEDs suffer from high capacitance or just the power LEDs....

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  • WilkoL commented on WilkoL's instructable Pulse Generator
    Pulse Generator

    First: Instructables is VERY slow with sending notifications, I received an email about your reply on the 28th of Januari!!!Ah, sprintf()... Yes, I found that problem too. And no, there is no itoa() or ltoa() available. So I had to make one myself, take a look here:https://gitlab.com/WilkoL/wakeup_light_stm8s103 In de lib folder you will find an itoa.h and itoa.cGood luck.

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  • WilkoL commented on dhamo1999's instructable IR REMOTE TESTER
    IR REMOTE TESTER

    What type of IR-receiver do you use? Most used are TSOP38x types and they should not be powered by more than 5.5V. I do like the simplicity of the circuit :-)

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  • WilkoL's instructable Big Seven Segment Display's weekly stats:
    • Big Seven Segment Display
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