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Wo1fMane

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  • Programming ESP8266 ESP-12E NodeMCU Using Arduino IDE - a Tutorial

    Thanks! I'm just starting out and I want to do some home automation. This tutorial got me successfully set up so I can proceed with learning and using the boards and sensors I've bought. I didn't have any loose LEDs lying around, but the important thing for me was to get the IDE set up and verify that I could upload a sketch to the dev board and get it to work.

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  • Wo1fMane commented on RobotMitchell's instructable Teardrop Camper
    Teardrop Camper

    What are the materials and structure of the floor and is the floor insulated? Were the levelers/stabilizers off-the-shelf items? They weren't mentioned in the text, but stabilizers are pretty much mandatory for any camper that has a suspension, otherwise the slightest movement shakes the whole thing.

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  • How to Make CRAZY Indulgent Millionaire Brownie Bars

    I just made these, and "decadent" doesn't even begin to describe them! They're fantastic, but one is all I can handle because they're so rich. I've never been much of a baker and don't have a candy thermometer, but I've tried to pay attention to good cooks all my life and these instructions are so good that my first attempt came out great. I probably could have waited a little longer to cut them and I didn't use parchment paper in the pan (I will next time) so they could be neater, but that doesn't hurt the taste.

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  • How to Install Load Resistors for LED Turn Signal Lights

    Anybody who can read can see that you did in fact assert all the things you are claiming you didn't.Anybody who claims that others should take their word for something based on experience is doing so because it's the only thing they have when all the facts disprove their claims.I know and have met many, many "experienced" people who are utterly incompetent at their jobs. The longer a person holds the same job (not necessarily the same exact position, they usually get promotions and get moved around within the organization in order to not permanently inflict them on anybody) the less intelligence and imagination that person has. Intelligent people thoroughly learn the job and get bored with it and want to try something new. Dumb people are easy to keep interested because they nev…

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    Anybody who can read can see that you did in fact assert all the things you are claiming you didn't.Anybody who claims that others should take their word for something based on experience is doing so because it's the only thing they have when all the facts disprove their claims.I know and have met many, many "experienced" people who are utterly incompetent at their jobs. The longer a person holds the same job (not necessarily the same exact position, they usually get promotions and get moved around within the organization in order to not permanently inflict them on anybody) the less intelligence and imagination that person has. Intelligent people thoroughly learn the job and get bored with it and want to try something new. Dumb people are easy to keep interested because they never actually understand anything, so everything remains magical and new to them.Incompetent people don't know they are incompetent. It's called the Dunning-Kruger Effect.I had a Computer Science instructor in university who was in his late fifties or early sixties and had co-written the textbook for the course. One day I had trouble understanding his "pseudocode" and couldn't get a very short program of 15 lines or so to work, so I went to his office and asked him to go over the pseudocode with me. He wouldn't do that, and instead decided to debug my program for me, which is not what I wanted. I wanted to understand the the problem, not have him give me the answer. But he couldn't fix the program because he didn't even understand the procedure himself. So an hour and a half later I gave up, left his office and dropped the course. He was quite "experienced", but utterly incompetent. Meanwhile, another instructor was in his twenties and recently graduated but when I took a 2-page handwritten program to him in the classroom, he was able to point out the mistake in the time it took him to read to that point, which was a few seconds. Sorry, "experience" (or a certificate on the wall) is less than worthless.Everybody knows that government regulations are a giant mixed bag of everything from logical, reasonable mandates to utterly insane gibberish, and all too often regulations exist only because corporations make money from those regulations. So claiming something is correct just because it's a regulation is just as far off base as claiming someone is correct just because they've been around longer. If you can't stick to scientific fact then don't argue.No, crimp connectors do NOT have "stress-relief features". They may claim to, but unless they include something that actually has some give to it and bends easily with moderate pressure - and is in constant contact with the wire - it is just lip service. I have yet to see any such thing. (And no, the wire's own insulation does NOT qualify as "a stress relief feature".) As I said before, that's irrelevant anyway if you properly route and secure the wires. And I have never, ever seen crimp connectors in any store that contained any copper at all. They are usually aluminum or other soft alloys for splice connections and harder white metal for anything else. Years ago many things were manufactured with plated copper contacts that were silver on the surface but copper underneath, but I haven't even seen anything like that for many years, and never saw it in crimp products available to the average consumer. Again, what is available to an aircraft technician is probably entirely different than what is available to the average DIY-er in a consumer store.It's absolutely true that a soldering oven can simultaneously solder hundreds of miniature components on a circuit board exponentially faster and cheaper than an individual human can do the same job. Does that translate to larger scale and very different things like wiring harnesses? Not even remotely. And if soldered connections are melted in a vehicle, that's the least of your problems and you should be completely replacing the wiring anyway.

    Jet fuel is *not* corrosive. It weakens natural rubber (as does alcohol, which is the one and only reason that old vehicles shouldn't be filled with ethanol without a thorough refit of all hoses and rubber parts; it WILL NOT HURT THE ENGINE), because it is a *solvent*, not corrosive, and doesn't affect most metals. Fuels and hydraulic fluids are also toxic and really bad for bare skin, but again that's not the same thing as corrosive. The same goes for hydraulic fluid. What *is* corrosive is road salt and every other ice- and snow-melt compound, which aircraft do *not* have to deal with. (The exception is amphibious aircraft that work on and around the ocean, but that's another whole batch of issues.) And gunk or stain isn't corrosion. You need to go look up the word "corrosive"…

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    Jet fuel is *not* corrosive. It weakens natural rubber (as does alcohol, which is the one and only reason that old vehicles shouldn't be filled with ethanol without a thorough refit of all hoses and rubber parts; it WILL NOT HURT THE ENGINE), because it is a *solvent*, not corrosive, and doesn't affect most metals. Fuels and hydraulic fluids are also toxic and really bad for bare skin, but again that's not the same thing as corrosive. The same goes for hydraulic fluid. What *is* corrosive is road salt and every other ice- and snow-melt compound, which aircraft do *not* have to deal with. (The exception is amphibious aircraft that work on and around the ocean, but that's another whole batch of issues.) And gunk or stain isn't corrosion. You need to go look up the word "corrosive".Aircraft in general are much more prone to vibration because the powerplants are much more rigidly mounted than in surface vehicles and the way the whole structure is constructed is more prone to transmitting vibrations. Hence the "safety wire" all over the place which you will only find on race cars, never consumer surface vehicles. Soldering is NOT cheaper or faster than crimping, especially for automated lines. Soldering requires some time, however short, to heat up *all* the parts to prevent "cold solder" joints, which sometimes don't work at all and will always fail in short order. Then the parts have to cool down so the solder can set (and cooling or heating too quickly causes problems as well) before they can be moved, which further slows down the line. Crimping, on the other hand, can be done in a tiny fraction of the time and the usual crimp alloys are cheaper and easier to produce than solder.A proper crimp makes a good joint, and it may make a "homogenous piece of copper" if both the wires and crimp are copper, but that's usually not the case. In fact, the crimp is usually of a different material and causes exactly the galvanic corrosion that you ascribe to solder. Then the exposure to actual corrosive chemicals compounds the issue.I have technical degrees as well, and I'm very familiar with chemistry and physics. But degrees don't mean anything if you don't actually understand the material, which you clearly don't. I have just as much experience as you, but unlike you I understand why things are done they way they are and why employees are told things that aren't true in order to keep them from thinking for themselves. Like that old nugget about metal fatigue. If a crimp makes a "homogeneous mass" as you say, then there is obviously zero difference between a crimp and solder because both are a solid, large cross section which is subject to identical tensile stress along the outside edge when subjected to a bending force. Which is why wires that are subject to bending are many small strands instead of one big one; the small strands have much smaller stresses for the same bending angle and can withstand repeated bending much, much longer. If you try to bend a solid core wire and an otherwise identical (material type and diameter) multi-strand wire the solid core will be very stiff but the multi-strand will still be quite flexible. But if your "proper crimp joint" makes it all one homogeneous strand, that's out the window. Ergo, the metal fatigue assertion is pure baloney because the truth is that nobody wants to explain that soldering would be much better but they're never going to do it because it's much, much slower and much, much more expensive.And yes, I get miffed when people "offer" misinformation and claim to know things they don't.

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  • Homemade Bullerjan Stove

    If you trace the front when you trace the back - before you weld the back on - you can save yourself some fiddly measuring and get a better fit.Great project!

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  • How to Install Load Resistors for LED Turn Signal Lights

    You need to mount the resistors to something that can stand up to the intense heat these resistors can generate. Unlike the filament in a bulb, they heat up slowly because of their thermal mass, but they cool off slowly for the same reason. Metal can stand the heat and also act as a heat sink. Plastic might melt or even catch fire if the signal is on a long time like in rush hour traffic.

    You're still wrong. All bikes have a relatively tiny "alternator" and will benefit from power savings, especially if you start adding accessories like auxiliary lights, heated grips or phone chargers. A lot of ICE bikes have problematic electrical systems from the factory, and every little bit helps. Conversely, adding more current draw back in with load resistors is a bad idea.

    You've misunderstand how cars work. No turn signal bulb is anywhere near 50 watts. That's headlight territory. According to your calculations, the resistor will be dissipating more power than the original bulb. Also, my resistor is 6 Watts, not 6 Ohms. I never said how many Ohms my resistor was. Those other resistors need to be 50 Watts because they have too little resistance. You need rethink your approach.By the way, my "insufficient" resistors are still working fine more than a year later. But that's only because I haven't had the spare time to track down why the flashers I've tried to use don't work in spite of the pinout being correct according to the wiring diagram and the markings on the OEM flasher. Sooner or later, the resistors won't be necessary.

    The problem is that's not as easy as it sounds. In order to wire the resistor in parallel with the bulb(s) you would in effect be shorting the relay, which would completely bypass it and turn the load resistor into a current limiting resistor.

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  • Thermochromic Temperature & Humidity Display

    That's awesome! It's mesmerizing, ironic and perfect.

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  • How to Install Load Resistors for LED Turn Signal Lights

    See above. The point is that the whole point of those resistors is to draw enough power to "fool" the flasher into thinking you're using an incandescent bulb. So yeah, they're drawing a significantly large percentage of their rated power, and defeating the major purpose of LED lights, which is to save power and not throw off a bunch of waste heat.

    Not necessarily. Not all vehicles are wired the same, or that simply.

    They do make CAN bus compatible LED bulbs.

    You're wrong, and completely missing the point. The point is that you need those high power resistors BECAUSE THEY ARE GOING TO DRAW A LOT OF POWER. If a small resistor would do, then you're drawing a small amount of power and it's no big deal. But the fact is, you HAVE to use those big resistors because they WILL draw nearly that much power, and then dissipate it as heat. It is hugely wasteful (and sometimes dangerous, because those resistors can get VERY hot) and defeats most of the benefit of using LED lamps.

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  • Wiring the resistor in parallel (which is the only way your calculation makes sense) is a huge waste of power and actually increases the load on your electrical system over stock incandescent bulbs, which is really dumb and lazy. If the LEDs can't function with the resistor in series, then they are poorly designed and made and you shouldn't be using them.The right way to fix the problem is to replace the flasher with one that flashes at the same rate regardless of the load, so it works with both LEDs and incandescent lamps in any combination. It saves energy and requires no modifications to your vehicle at all. Plug and play. Most people who don't properly inspect their own vehicles for proper function of basic equipment like lights don't know or care what that fast flashing means anyway.

    There are too many problems with your calculations to list. But a glaring problem is that the resistors' values aren't actually given. Using that calculator, the 6 Watt resistor would have to be 32 Ohms, and the 50 Watt resistor would have to be 4 Ohms. But that ignores the rest of the circuit and that calculator only works for a single component. If you put a 4 Ohm resistor in series with the LEDs, and assuming the LED lamp draws a generous 1 Amp, you get a power dissipation of only 4 Watts and a voltage drop of 4 Volts across the resistor, which leaves 10 Volts for the LEDs. That's well within the operating specs of everything.

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