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  • 50 Year Old Vise Restoration- Using Basic Tools

    Steel wool coated in WD40 always works for me.

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  • WoodPlay commented on Phil B's instructable No Wiggle Handle3 years ago
    No Wiggle Handle

    Great idea Phil. Really like this. You may be interested in this product. I have one and it does everything it claims.http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=59452&cat=1,43456

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  • WoodPlay commented on kooler's instructable Dresser to Bench Thingy3 years ago
    Dresser to Bench Thingy

    As I get a bit older and a bit stiffer, I'd love to have one of these when I'm putting socks and shoes on. Great design and execution. Well done.

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  • How I destroyed our dinning table.

    I feel your pain. Nothing hurts more than your vision of a project taking a turn for the worse. Unfortunately, most tables that claim to be solid wood are only referring to legs and other secondary parts. Table tops are often veneered for two reasons. First, as a cost saving and, second, as a structural consideration. The latter is actually more important. Using solid wood for the top can lead to warping over time. A particle board, or other "manufactured" material, provides stability to an otherwise large, moisture-absorbing surface. Some of the finest, most expensive Victorian furniture has veneer over a more stable substrate.All that said, your photos appear to indicate the outer edges of the top are indeed solid. The particle board is enclosed within. A nice option may be ...

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    I feel your pain. Nothing hurts more than your vision of a project taking a turn for the worse. Unfortunately, most tables that claim to be solid wood are only referring to legs and other secondary parts. Table tops are often veneered for two reasons. First, as a cost saving and, second, as a structural consideration. The latter is actually more important. Using solid wood for the top can lead to warping over time. A particle board, or other "manufactured" material, provides stability to an otherwise large, moisture-absorbing surface. Some of the finest, most expensive Victorian furniture has veneer over a more stable substrate.All that said, your photos appear to indicate the outer edges of the top are indeed solid. The particle board is enclosed within. A nice option may be to use a "router sled" that rides on the outer, solid edges and lower the particle board by 1/16". (Just google router sled.)Once the particle board is lower than the edges, refinish the entire table and then apply a 1/16" leather top with an appropriate adhesive. Leather and oak look very nice together. A synthetic leather may look just as nice.Your best approach would be to purchase the leather first, so you know exactly how much you need to lower the particle board. Ideally, the leather and the oak trim should be the same height, but making the leather slightly higher will work as well. Just remember to leave a small groove at the outer edge of the particle board to tuck the leather into, so the edges don't lift.This may sound like a challenge, but it's actually much simpler than learning the art of veneering.All the best,WoodPlay

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