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Zaacharia

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Aging pretty boy hippie trying to keep up.

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  • Huge DIY Concrete Face Garden Sculpture

    This will be way useful in my 'Random Acts of Art' - I think that I will a glass version

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  • Skull Mask - Customized

    Darn! Now I am trying to see how I can do this in glass - normally, it would be done on a flat sheet of glass then sagged into a mold. There are also some Day of the Dead skulls (down that rabbit hole now) that are nearly as beautiful - then I ended up at DeviantArt. I am stunned by the possibilities!

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  • Melt Down Your Aluminum Cans

    Using propane with forced air forge will melt bronze (we did this in the 1970s using propeller bronze) and cast stuff using sand molds. Since propeller bronze is designed to last a long time in an unforgiving environment, it is not easy to work with after casting.(where ever I used the word propeller please substitute screw).

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  • Mandalorian Beskar - Kinetic Sand Casting

    So, if I use kinetic sand to cast glass objects, how do I restore it? What is it that dries up? I kept looking at kinetic sand as a casting media in the past but never followed up. I cast small to medium sized objects in glass using my microwave and an 8x8x6 kiln and really like the idea of using the sand.

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  • Plastic Insect/Animal Brooch

    I love your bugs - I do (roughly) the same thing but use the toys to cast them in glass. Where do you get your bugs? I have to look around for more - I have octopus, spider, some beetle with huge jaws and am looking for more.

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  • How to Make Dalgona or Whipped Coffee

    Nice blend of warm, airy coffee foam with cold milk blending in mouth!

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  • Lazy Man Bread | 4 Ingredients Bread Recipe | No Knead | No Machine

    I replace one of the cups of flour with a cup of rye flour - it is wonderful!

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  • Micro Sandpaper Detailing Tool

    Didn't mean to :) The 20 pounder is overkill, I think it takes me 2+ years to go through it; if I had to do it over, I would get a 10 pounder that would fit under the sink!! I think of the savings: 3 (or more) liters per day, using the same 4 bottles means less plastic and transportation and the refill costs about $24.Note that white skull's eye - I can drill some of that out but your trick will allow me to bring it back to (almost) surface-tension smooth.

    Wonderful idea! I have some tiny spaces in the glass that I cast; I will probably need a Dremel tool to get into some of the tiny spaces. I will probably use grits of 250, 400, & 600 (I have a bunch of grits above 1500 but those are for wooden pens (which I do not work with ?? why I bought them?? but they might be useful. I do a lot of skulls, faces, monsters, et c. with tiny spaces that need some prep work. This idea is going to let me clean up some stuff I have had around for ages - lets see if I have a pic on this pc

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  • Dust Free Sanding Using a Storage Container

    This idea is so cool! It can also be used as a vacuum for making molds - just put the object you want molded on the surface, turn it on, and then place the flexible mold material over the object.

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  • Making Fused Glass Jewelry in a Microwave Kiln

    Generally, as long as the glass is from the same manufacturer you can use stained glass. I did back when I was poor - I would buy scraps from the stained glass place and used that. Your glass fusion teacher was probably worried about incompatibility (different CoE). Go ahead and use the scraps - play around with what you have since the worst that will happen is it will crack.

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  • Wacom Pen Holder Hand AKA Making a Plaster Cast of Your Hand

    Hah! In stead of making the hand out of plaster, I can make it out of wax then, using the lost wax method, cast it in glass.Also, many years ago I used alginate to make a life mask; the first one came out full size; then the mold shrunk and I made a mini-me life mask. Since my kiln is only 8x8x8 I can't cast my life mask in glass.All you mold makers, if you can make a mold of it, you can cast it in glass - provided you have the heat.

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  • Zaacharia followed Art, Main Course, Software, Mobile and 8 others channel
  • Zaacharia commented on mr_fid's instructable How to CUT GLASS.

    The only time we used gloves was we were cleaning the inside surfaces of double pane glass. If there was a fingerprint in there, you could guarantee it would be spotted and sent back.

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  • Zaacharia commented on mr_fid's instructable How to CUT GLASS.

    I first started cutting glass in 1971 when I was building insulated (double-pained) glass windows. I think the first rule I learned (they asked that I repeat it 7 times):DO NOT CATCH FALLING GLASSThen it was do not be dainty and do it in one stroke - start at the far edge and pull the cutter towards you.We worked on a carpeted surface; we made the stroke, pulled the sheet to edge of the table so that the score was right on the edge, lift the sheet and drop it applying extra pressure. When the piece was too large, we would place a yard stick at the score, lift the sheet and drop it. Our wastage was minimal but since I was the most junior, my job at the end of the day was to take a 5 foot 40 pound rod and smash the glass in the dumpster (What a feeling of release).Sorry for the nostalgia bu…

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    I first started cutting glass in 1971 when I was building insulated (double-pained) glass windows. I think the first rule I learned (they asked that I repeat it 7 times):DO NOT CATCH FALLING GLASSThen it was do not be dainty and do it in one stroke - start at the far edge and pull the cutter towards you.We worked on a carpeted surface; we made the stroke, pulled the sheet to edge of the table so that the score was right on the edge, lift the sheet and drop it applying extra pressure. When the piece was too large, we would place a yard stick at the score, lift the sheet and drop it. Our wastage was minimal but since I was the most junior, my job at the end of the day was to take a 5 foot 40 pound rod and smash the glass in the dumpster (What a feeling of release).Sorry for the nostalgia but I had not thought about that for 30 years.

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  • Zaacharia commented on JasonF205's instructable Milk Jug Skulls

    Oh, Yay!!! I will post an "I did it shortly"

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  • Zaacharia commented on JasonF205's instructable Milk Jug Skulls

    This solves one of my problems - I cast in glass using a kiln that is 4 inches in diam and 3 inches high so I work with smallish objects. I mostly use ice cube trays of odd objects for my negatives but quit often, I start with a positive from which I have to create a negative using either of 2 substances (one also turns transparent at working temperatures) - they are expensive but reusable. Using old water bottles with a heat gun seems a much simpler, easier method. I bet that I can use a heat gun on the other substances that normally say to use water at 120 F.Do you use anything to prevent the plastic from sticking to the model? I attached an image of some skulls I did a couple years ago - technique and subjects have changed quite a bit since.

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  • We had a foundry using propane and a fan; we were able to cast propeller bronze but when we dropped a copper penny into it, the penny stayed a penny floating in the bronze. I currently work with warm glass which has a working point similar to copper; I use a special kiln designed to be used in a microwave oven - I am going to test it for copper (I have about 500 copper pennies all 'wheat-straw' worth face value). If I remember, I will post results here.

    I use Cast-a-Lot to melt glass - it can be used more than once. Glass has a working point as low as 1850 F but I cast at about 2k F to get interesting convection currents - i suppose I really should do a 'structible sometime soon.

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  • When working with really fine powder (I was using different grades of sieves on bags of glass) and repurposed an old CPAP to protect my lungs.

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  • Way kool! I cast glass and there are some bottles with colors I really want to use. What I have done is score around the bottom then across the bottom (like cutting a pie) then drop a piece of rebar through the top of the bottle and knocked out the bottom. Cutting the bottle into strips just never went well - I think this will solve that problem. I will post if/when I get a chance to try it.

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  • I apologize for not making myself clear. When I shut the valve and shake some more it is to check that it is at the pressure I want. So, if I shake it and there is no change in the gauges, then I have the bottle at the pressure I want. Sometimes, when I shut the valve and the bottle is not fully charged I will notice that the input valve will lose pressure as it fully pressurizes - output valve will remain at the 60 psi that I typically use. If the input valve/meter goes to zero, then the output valve/meter will then begin to drop.The point of shaking the bottle with the valve shut is to ensure that the CO2 pressure is what I want (which is a little less messy than turning the bottle upside down and shaking it).

    Yeah but running the water through a filter is easier and I am lazy.

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  • I really like your idea; I work with powders more so I have repurposed an old CPAP as my lung protection (I use a full-face mask that covers both mouth and nose). My problem is being able to wear protective goggles with the mask (I really hate either or protection). I think I am ready to cut the goggles down to fit and try to adapt your lower skull face to the CPAP. I really hope I can work it out - will post a pic if I do.

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  • A friend worked with a sculptor in carving and casting "Waiting for the Interurban" in Seattle; it was carved in Styrofoam and cast in aluminum (you can see the styro bead-form when you look close). I assume it was pretty much the same process

    Darn, I got sidetracked on my previous post; I cast in glass and have been thinking about getting a 3d printer - I think this convinced me to invest in one.

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  • In step 7 substep 7 - I shake regular side up and turn the tank off and shake some more to see if carbonation is maxed out. Sorry, I seem to be a little OCD today. Your 'structible is wonderful and I am going to go back over my system using it.

    I can't find the 'edit' button; I charge my bottles to 60 psi and have for about 7 years. I keep 4 bottles charged in the fridge and, lately, I keep filtered water in the fridge and use that when I charge. OT: Seattle has really wonderful water but the ice cubes I make with purified water are clear and city water cubes are cloudy.

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  • Home Carbonation System for Water, Beer, and More

    I wish I had read your article before I built mine! I bought a 20 # tank and it takes me about 2 years to use it up and it is too big to fit under the counter, sigh. Besides all the other savings there us also savings in resources (reusing already purchased) and transportation. I spent 8 days in a cabin in the mountains and I went through 3 or 4 12 packs of sparkling water. I decided to build my setup when I realized I was going through a case or 2 a week of Talking Rain (really good stuff).***WARNING***Do not reuse glass bottles! It is the equivalent if playing with a grenade - a failure will blow glass shards every where.Thanks for pointing out the difference in thread tape - I used the white stuff so there is always just a little bit of a leak.

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  • I used to make something similar but with layers of ham (just another way to get rid of leftover holiday ham). I like your recipe (and I can't remember mine - if I ever had one. Thanks, I have been missing this in my diet.

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  • Late to the game but with round magnets you can make a rail gun and shoot ball-bearings through the walls (er, don't do that - build a backdrop).

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  • Those are beautiful! I would display them as art!

    I work with glass (and knives) - never, ever catch a falling sharp (or buzzing) thing. I grabbed a piece of falling plate glass I was working on and let go immediately - my fingers were sliced to the tendons, but did not actually touch the tendons. It scared me spit-less but I learned; now, as soon as something begins to fall, I step back and let gravity take its course.

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  • The important thing that ride does is: stops you from trying to turn it on and use it to see if it is okay. Turning on a wet electronic device destroys it; putting it in rice keeps you away from it long enough to dry.

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  • Another use for used dryer sheets - fill with dryer lint, tie shut, drip wax on them and you have the best darned fire-starter. Really, but don't buy the wax retail, get candles from yard sales. My brother-in-law laughed at the suggestion until I used them to light the cabin's wood-burning stove. Actually, sawdust and candle wax in dixie cups work well too.

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  • Oh, WOW! What a beautiful design. I probably do not have the patience to make the entire pattern but I might try a smaller version for my glass 'stuff'. And I am considering making an instructable for casting the glass. I also like that you have the entire project on the opening page.

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  • In a forced air system, it would seem to be best to clean the air as returns but some of the newer systems have a low speed fan so you can run air through the system year around and, with good filters, keep that winter dust storm on startup.

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  • The key is that the dome of the kiln contains magnetite (or an equivalent) that is agitated by the microwaves converting the waves to heat - the insulation is really, really good.

    The kiln is well insulated and the cooling period works pretty well. I drop most of my objects to make sure they do not break easily (a couple of the skulls in my previous comment are 1 or more years old - I also check them out with my home-made stressometer (which now has an official name but I forget it).

    There are 4 ways to work with glass:1) fusing - this can vary from objects that keep their own form but attach to each other up to being melted into each other2) slumping - the glass is supported at the edges 'slumps' down into shape.3) sagging - the glass is supported in the center and sags around the edge.4) casting - glass is melted completely into a mold.

    The ball at the other end of the glass cutter can be used to help in the cutting process - tap the underside of the glass along the score, you can hear when the glass begins to 'break' (hard to explain how the glass sounds but you can also see the crack in the glass) continue to tap along score and the piece will fall apart. I will admit to being a glass whisperer so your mileage may very. the cutter wheel needs to be lubricated and cleaned; buy the self-lubricating kind if you can afford it; clean the cutter wheel often.

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  • Making Fused Glass Jewelry in a Microwave Kiln

    I love your 'structable! I wish I could design such nice objects I had a ceramics kiln back in the late '80s and did a lot of sagging, slumping, and fusing. The kiln was not mine and I had to return it. It was not until about 5 years ago that I discovered the microwave kiln. Things I discovered: 1) you can get cheap glass as scrap from stained-glass shops 2) only fuse glass from the same manufacturer (for COE compatibility) 3) buy the bigger kiln - the extra space is a huge deal. If you have an old pair of polarized sun glasses, remove the lenses and look at your finished piece through the 2 lenses that have been rotates by 90 degrees so that no light gets through. If you see vague light leaking through the lenses, this implies stress (COE incompatibility where one type of glass expands/c…

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    I love your 'structable! I wish I could design such nice objects I had a ceramics kiln back in the late '80s and did a lot of sagging, slumping, and fusing. The kiln was not mine and I had to return it. It was not until about 5 years ago that I discovered the microwave kiln. Things I discovered: 1) you can get cheap glass as scrap from stained-glass shops 2) only fuse glass from the same manufacturer (for COE compatibility) 3) buy the bigger kiln - the extra space is a huge deal. If you have an old pair of polarized sun glasses, remove the lenses and look at your finished piece through the 2 lenses that have been rotates by 90 degrees so that no light gets through. If you see vague light leaking through the lenses, this implies stress (COE incompatibility where one type of glass expands/contracts by a different amount). I have a piece that I made 12 years ago that will probably shatter in another 20 years (the object is a large blob of glass with a crack in the center that has increased a couple centimeters in length over that time).I skipped right past the fusing stage (after taking notes - keep a log, folks; you want to know what varying the various variables do (puns available on request)). I have 3 pages of fusing notes. I had some sugar skulls forms left from day of the dead and was intrigued by the idea of making glass puddles. I went to Seattle Pottery for kiln release and a glass supply shop for high temp casting material (Cast-a-lot); I went to an art supply shop for re-usable forming materials. Pic one is casting at about 1700 F, pics 2 and 3 are different skulls and different casting methods.

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  • Look in your local thrift store for those old 'twister-type' weight loss swivels (my mom uses hers under the Scrabble board). They were designed to be stood on so they would definitely work for sitting. I am going to upgrade the bucket I use for odd jobs around the apt.

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  • My foam covers keep slipping out of their tiny little grooves. I keep stuffing them back in, maybe this is the solution: just glue that sucker on and cover it some nice material.

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  • I have some welding rod of various gauges left over from glass bead making (used as mandrels) - not free but definitely a good re-purposing. Thanks for the great idea!

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  • Zaacharia commented on inspiretomake's instructable Meteorite Ring

    You bought your meteorite already sliced, is that correct? I have a couple of small, whole meteorites that I was going have made into wedding bands but I could never come up with a way to keep the original surface - any ideas? They are small, finger-joint sized.

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  • I use the Japanese method for folding t-shirts since I do not have the surface space available. I am showing the version in Japanese because that is how I learned it (it took me many, many tries but I am a slow learner). This method works for long-sleeved dress shirts when packing for a trip - the last step being carefully rolling it up without wrinkles.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b5AWQ5aBjgE

    Then I found this - even easierhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u6n3lq3PhAU

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  • Finding parts to work with is improved if you search for "Day of the Dead" molds. The Mexican (and most Hispanic cultures) treat DotD as joyous celebration and often have a picnic on the grave of a loved one on the day after Halloween (all Hallows evening) aka All Saints Day. I have been using molds for making sugar skulls for my glass castings for a year or so (I picked up the discounted molds at a Dollar store I think years ago and only recently found a use for them)

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  • In any case, I always recommend wearing a tightly knit silk shirt under it all just in case anything gets through. Almost nothing pierces silk so it is dragged into the body which will keep germs out and will help with removal.

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  • Back when I was young and stupid, I bought a half-gallon of hydrofluoric acid, some dishwashing gloves, and wax. I would coat a plate of glass in wax, carve the design into the wax then drop it into the HF bath. It worked but now that I look back I understand why the windows in the kitchen started to blur - and now, 40 years later, am having some 'interesting' breathing issues (sigh). I now use the paste but sort of miss the days of clueless stupidity - we also set up a bronze foundry using propeller bronze and could not understand why it was so difficult to detail after the casting, another heavy sigh!

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  • If you stick the mandrel with the bead into vermiculite or some other insulating material, you can anneal the beads w/o a kiln.

    I use an old electric grill to preheat the glass I am going to use - it cuts down on the time it takes to make the beads and I can switch to different colors. The easiest way to test compatibility is to heat 2 glasses together and pull them into a thread.

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  • Yes! I got a couple pieces of granite from a local monument place - I could get the granite so hot it glowed but could not get it to melt. I chickened out (granite melts at about 1240 F) after more minutes than I was comfortable with.

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