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  • Digital Wall Calendar and Home Information Center

    I found that forecast.io with the animated HTML 5 "climacons" were using 50 to 70 percent of my Pi's CPU resources, causing it to overheat in its case. Forecast.io has other widgets that use static icons that do not take up any CPU resources and look pretty good.

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  • arcraven commented on arcraven's instructable Bike Trailer -- Tough and Light5 months ago
    Bike Trailer -- Tough and Light

    I loaded everything over the axle as much as I could. Fully loaded, I did not notice significant downward load on the rear wheel, but I can totally see what you're getting at. I would venture to guess that the trailer takes about 90 to 05 percent of the load due to the transfer of the weight from the netting to the frame, and then to the axle. I'd bet not very much actually gets to the trailer tongue, as long as its long enough. With this design, I actually did overload the trailer, but it the weak point was the threaded rod axle itself, which will allow the wheels to splay out due to bending of the axle.

    I did not spend much time thinking about this, mostly because I'm a poor engineer. I made my best guess as to the alignment of the tow bar so that the center line of the trailer would align with the center line of the bike. I also hoped that the trailer would find its own line, even if its not exactly aligned with the bike. The attachment method I decided on had enough swivel and play in it that it seemed the trailer would take the easier and most direct path, that being more behind the bike than not. In practice, I didn't make exact measurements of how this turned out. The trailer did not show any ill effects of not being aligned directly behind the bike and I suppose the play in the tires, axle, and attachment to the bike frame just took up the slack.If I really wanted some exact...

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    I did not spend much time thinking about this, mostly because I'm a poor engineer. I made my best guess as to the alignment of the tow bar so that the center line of the trailer would align with the center line of the bike. I also hoped that the trailer would find its own line, even if its not exactly aligned with the bike. The attachment method I decided on had enough swivel and play in it that it seemed the trailer would take the easier and most direct path, that being more behind the bike than not. In practice, I didn't make exact measurements of how this turned out. The trailer did not show any ill effects of not being aligned directly behind the bike and I suppose the play in the tires, axle, and attachment to the bike frame just took up the slack.If I really wanted some exactness, I would model this in SketchUp to determine the correct angles. But honestly, it didn't seem to be a factor in my experience, as long as the attachment method was flexible.

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