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  • How to Make a Foldable Pikler Triangle (climbing Frame)

    I realize this comment was two years ago (and you may well have already known the difference), but before anyone else tries it, it's important to note that common hardware store boiled linseed oil uses an assortment of really nasty drying agents that are the opposite of non-toxic. Think "heavy metals" - and we're not talking Manowar here. You might not want to expose your baby to Manowar either, but it's probably less harmful than lead and cobalt.I haven't used them, but there do seem to be some versions of BLO that are formulated explicitly to be non-toxic - you'll have to shop carefully for them, though.Raw linseed oil, on the other hand (also sold as flaxseed oil) is safe... but it can take weeks for each coat to cure, making it impractical as a finish for all but the very pa…

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    I realize this comment was two years ago (and you may well have already known the difference), but before anyone else tries it, it's important to note that common hardware store boiled linseed oil uses an assortment of really nasty drying agents that are the opposite of non-toxic. Think "heavy metals" - and we're not talking Manowar here. You might not want to expose your baby to Manowar either, but it's probably less harmful than lead and cobalt.I haven't used them, but there do seem to be some versions of BLO that are formulated explicitly to be non-toxic - you'll have to shop carefully for them, though.Raw linseed oil, on the other hand (also sold as flaxseed oil) is safe... but it can take weeks for each coat to cure, making it impractical as a finish for all but the very patient.

    Further down someone suggested McMaster-Carr part #93015A217 ( https://www.mcmaster.com/93015A217/ ) as a substitute. They're more expensive, but McMaster doesn't have a minimum order.As for the purpose, I'm not positive (and I hope someone else can correct me on this) but it looks like it acts as a release pin to fold up the triangle. Someone else recommends hitch pins for what I believe is the same purpose.

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  • batcrave followed Knots, Clocks, Tools, Cookies and 51 others channel
  • batcrave commented on diyhuntress's instructable DIY Resin & Wood Comb
    DIY Resin & Wood Comb

    I've played a little with wood & resin before, but only on pieces where the resin was fully contained. How sturdy is the bond on thin, unsupported bits like that mostly-resin tooth on the right?

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  • Mesmerizing Ferrofluid-Display: Silently Controlled by Electromagnets

    Ok, I'll admit it... I want the clock too. But on the video game front, what about a single-screen platformer (blobformer?), in the vein of [Not-Yet-Super] Mario Bros? Another candidate (if less entertaining to watch) might be something like BSD's "robots" (or the early Mac "Daleks") - although I'm not sure quite how to differentiate the "player" blob from the "robot" blobs.

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  • Make a Typewriter Keyboard Wall With Paper + Resin!

    Nice work. I made a typewriter key monogram on a knife handle as a gift a while back, but couldn't bring myself to cannibalize an antique typewriter, so I've been interested to see the other ways people have approached the problem.I eventually ended up using a lathe to turn the "keys", printing out letters scanned in by someone with a stronger stomach who'd already butchered a similar model, and then, like you, using a resin fill for the "glass" before setting them in pockets cut in the scales.Mine came out a little smaller than yours, though.

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  • I've been running into the same problem off and on lately with Firefox (even with all my usual batch of privacy & blocking extensions disabled), but Chrome seems to work fine (even with most of those same extensions still running). So for whoever next stumbles on this thread - six months or a year down the line - it might be worth trying to swap browsers as a workaround.

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  • RUST!!! Removal. Using Electrolysis.

    Just a quick note, in case anyone wants to skip a few steps and/or keep their PSU at least partially intact for other projects. Instead of cutting off all the plugs & opening the case, you can also just grab the big 20/24-pin plug and jumper the green (PS_ON) pin to any of the black (GND) pins using any random bit of wire that'll stay in place (snipping the wires, stripping the ends, and twisting them together outside the case will also work - if keeping things intact isn't a concern - as will buying/making one of these gadgets: https://ebay.us/v3ajRz ). PS_ON is just a signal-level connection, so even a bent paperclip is safe, as long as you're careful that it only jumpers green to black. Also, if you are cutting off plugs, keep an eye on the purple (5VSB) wire. It's live (usually ju…

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    Just a quick note, in case anyone wants to skip a few steps and/or keep their PSU at least partially intact for other projects. Instead of cutting off all the plugs & opening the case, you can also just grab the big 20/24-pin plug and jumper the green (PS_ON) pin to any of the black (GND) pins using any random bit of wire that'll stay in place (snipping the wires, stripping the ends, and twisting them together outside the case will also work - if keeping things intact isn't a concern - as will buying/making one of these gadgets: https://ebay.us/v3ajRz ). PS_ON is just a signal-level connection, so even a bent paperclip is safe, as long as you're careful that it only jumpers green to black. Also, if you are cutting off plugs, keep an eye on the purple (5VSB) wire. It's live (usually just a couple amps @ 5VDC, granted... but live) any time the PSU is plugged in (and, if it has a manual switch, switched on) even when it doesn't show any other signs of being running.

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  • This is fascinating - and not a trick I'd seen before - but I'm really looking forward to the metal 'ible. I've got a small electric vacuum furnace, but it only handles a small & incredibly cramped volume compared to something like this.

    Shhhh! What she doesn't know won't get you banished from the kitchen.

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  • batcrave commented on mwawoodworks's instructable Dust Cyclone Cart

    I tend to be of the same opinion when it comes to supposed "How To's" that require purchasing plans, or exist only to sell the plans/tool/part required. Instructables of the format "How to make an X: Step 1) Buy my X-inator. ; Step 2) Push the 'Make an X' button . Step 3) Done!" or "Step 1) Buy my plans. ; Step 2) Follow the plans instead of the instructions I don't actually provide here. ; Step 3) Done!" are especially offensive, since it feels like a terrible abuse of an otherwise extremely helpful platform. But (while I'll admit to instinctively cringing a little whenever I see an I'ble that's offering anything for sale) I really don't think it's fair to lump this one into that category.In this case (while I haven't tried actually following it yet, and pro…

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    I tend to be of the same opinion when it comes to supposed "How To's" that require purchasing plans, or exist only to sell the plans/tool/part required. Instructables of the format "How to make an X: Step 1) Buy my X-inator. ; Step 2) Push the 'Make an X' button . Step 3) Done!" or "Step 1) Buy my plans. ; Step 2) Follow the plans instead of the instructions I don't actually provide here. ; Step 3) Done!" are especially offensive, since it feels like a terrible abuse of an otherwise extremely helpful platform. But (while I'll admit to instinctively cringing a little whenever I see an I'ble that's offering anything for sale) I really don't think it's fair to lump this one into that category.In this case (while I haven't tried actually following it yet, and probably won't until I figure out why my vac is spewing sparks like an old Blackstar action figure) it looks like the instructable is entirely sufficient in its own right, with the plans only offered as a shortcut. In fact, unless you happen to have the same brand & model of shopvac, I suspect the instructions here are going to be far more useful than a set of fixed-size plans could be.

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  • That's a neat looking tool - I'd seen chatter tools(which are unfortunately limited to endgrain, and not much use on pens) and spiraling or knurling wheels, but I hadn't seen one of those before. It costs a little much for an impulse buy right now, but I'm wondering if I could make one and then just buy a replacement cutter to mount in it. I'm guessing it's basically a handle with a pair of ball bearings at the end that that cutter head spins in?As for the fogging, there are a couple possibilities. Occasionally if the glue sets funny (I've seen certain glue/activator combinations do this, as well as "activator substitutes" like baking soda & water) it'll get a foggy/milky color, but more often I see it when the glue either doesn't adhere to the underlying surface (due to oil…

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    That's a neat looking tool - I'd seen chatter tools(which are unfortunately limited to endgrain, and not much use on pens) and spiraling or knurling wheels, but I hadn't seen one of those before. It costs a little much for an impulse buy right now, but I'm wondering if I could make one and then just buy a replacement cutter to mount in it. I'm guessing it's basically a handle with a pair of ball bearings at the end that that cutter head spins in?As for the fogging, there are a couple possibilities. Occasionally if the glue sets funny (I've seen certain glue/activator combinations do this, as well as "activator substitutes" like baking soda & water) it'll get a foggy/milky color, but more often I see it when the glue either doesn't adhere to the underlying surface (due to oils, waxes, or the fact that I'm stupidly trying to glue incompatible plastics), or doesn't adhere quite well enough and then separates later when the wood moves or flexes, which could be why you didn't notice it at first. This can be a problem on some of the oilier exotic woods (although it's possible to alternate coats of CA & BLO to good effect - go figure), but it's usually enough to give them a quick wipedown with acetone before applying the glue. The decorative wax is likely to be trickier, though, since wiping it off sort of defeats the point.One option that might work is to seal the pen with a thin coat of shellac (specifically unwaxed shellac - Zinsser's SealCoat is probably going to be the easiest pre-made option, at least in the US) and then, once the shellac cures, apply the CA finish over it. I don't have much experience with shellac (although I've got a few pounds of raw flakes pouting on the shelf waiting to be tried), but it's traditionally used as a barrier coat between otherwise incompatible finishes - "shellac sticks to anything, and anything sticks to shellac", or so the saying goes. You generally wouldn't want to use a hard, brittle finish (like CA) over shellac on top of a soft surface (like wax) for fear of cracking when it's pressed on, but with the wax only lying in fine detail work like this, I don't think that's likely to be a problem. For that matter, I suppose you could avoid the whole issue by just using a shellac finish - I think the Mylands pen finishing "system" is basically a sanding sealer, a shellac-based friction polish, and then carbnauba wax - although it doesn't have nearly the long-term durability of a CA finish (not that you need a durable finish - or any finish, really - over ebony).Also, I meant to ask before - what's that beehive-shaped marblewood piece top of the barrel trimmer? Just a handle?

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  • One thing on the materials list that's probably worth clarifying: Be careful which "Mystery Oil" you use. I haven't worked with the John Boos Mystery Oil specified, but it looks like it's a variety of butcher block oil. The widely available Marvel Mystery Oil, on the other hand, is a product that's great for a wide variety of other purposes, but I wouldn't suggest using it as a wood finish.

    Very nice work, although I'd be curious to know more about the texturing tool you mentioned. This is also the first time I've seen your gold powder+wax idea used on pens, which I'm dying to try out. I'm a big fan of CA finishes, though, and I'm worried the wax (even just in deep grooves) would prevent the CA from setting or adhering properly, potentially leading to fogginess in the short term (it's possible what you were seeing was the wax making the CA cloudy, rather than the CA making the wax cloudy) and cracking or peeling in the long term.This is a similar style I turned a couple years back as an experiment on a little DIY not-quite-a-lathe, using a DIY pin chuck (a lot more work and probably a whole lot less effective than your jam chuck). While I like the way it turned out, it was s…

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    Very nice work, although I'd be curious to know more about the texturing tool you mentioned. This is also the first time I've seen your gold powder+wax idea used on pens, which I'm dying to try out. I'm a big fan of CA finishes, though, and I'm worried the wax (even just in deep grooves) would prevent the CA from setting or adhering properly, potentially leading to fogginess in the short term (it's possible what you were seeing was the wax making the CA cloudy, rather than the CA making the wax cloudy) and cracking or peeling in the long term.This is a similar style I turned a couple years back as an experiment on a little DIY not-quite-a-lathe, using a DIY pin chuck (a lot more work and probably a whole lot less effective than your jam chuck). While I like the way it turned out, it was something of a hack job (ok, it was a complete hack job) - the lighter bands were just created by sanding through the mess of assorted dyes & stain on the rest (I think the whole thing was actually poplar, layered with strips of black leather and/or black plastic at the center), which made sanding and finishing especially awkward. I've been meaning to give it another try - having since moved on to real lathes, real tools, and real wood - but some other project keeps distracting me.

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  • I initially had the same thought... but at the same time, what a beautiful and elegant way to slash your wrists! If you look at some of the common commercial designs, though, they tend to be far worse - generally leaving both edges of the blade completely exposed, and only occasionally offer a separate slip cover as an afterthought.Besides, it needs to be looked at in context. It's a project for someone who feels comfortable using a bandsaw - a tool just as capable of removing a hand as the finished product is slitting a wrist.That being said, a matching box and/or a similarly sleek display stand that conveniently also covers the blade would turn it into a great gift set.

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  • My thoughts were similar - especially after seeing the price on the (admittedly nifty) tritium vials - except, instead of EL wire and having to deal with AC and fitting in an inverter, using LED filaments (as seen in "vintage"-style decorative bulbs, and available for $8.50/10pk on ebay). I figured it could all be run with a Digispark, Pico, or other tiny devboard packed inside the center cube with an accelerometer for control and a small LiPo cell or two for power. Of course, then I actually read the specs on the filaments, and discovered that they usually run at 70V @ 10-13mA each (although running it dimmed - for visual effect rather than room illumination - should be able to bring that down lower), and any method I can think of to pull that out of a couple LiPo cells is goin…

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    My thoughts were similar - especially after seeing the price on the (admittedly nifty) tritium vials - except, instead of EL wire and having to deal with AC and fitting in an inverter, using LED filaments (as seen in "vintage"-style decorative bulbs, and available for $8.50/10pk on ebay). I figured it could all be run with a Digispark, Pico, or other tiny devboard packed inside the center cube with an accelerometer for control and a small LiPo cell or two for power. Of course, then I actually read the specs on the filaments, and discovered that they usually run at 70V @ 10-13mA each (although running it dimmed - for visual effect rather than room illumination - should be able to bring that down lower), and any method I can think of to pull that out of a couple LiPo cells is going to be just as bulky as the EL wire's inverter.I suppose an alternative would be to just accept the need for wires, plug it into the wall, crank the power on the filaments, and call it a lamp. Or make it using tritium vials and sit in the dark to play with it. Light is overrated anyhow.

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