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1Instructables974Views31CommentsAustralia
Veteran software engineer, boffin, woodworker.
      • Emergency Mask Keeper
      • Reverse Glass Painting
      • Artist's Popsicle Stick Puzzle
  • Emergency Mask Keeper

    I have just gone through the recycling bin to retrieve the makings.Thank you for the great idea, and the gentle reminder to be kind. We need a lot more kindness in the world and we can all do our little bit.

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  • How to Make a Sanding Bow

    Cloth backed sandpaper will allow you to avoid needing strapping tape. You can buy this by the roll for not a lot of money.I like your design. It's the best I've seen!Thanks.

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  • Shaker Doors >> Tongue & Groove

    In my experience, plywood panels are very dimensionally stable. I have frame and plywood panel furniture items (not doors) I made 20+ years ago that are fully glued with no problems. The bonus is that the resulting item is very strong. These items are in my workshop, have been moved across the country and back again, and suffer the full swings of temperature and humidity that the Australian climate gives it.Of course, there is absolutely no harm in leaving them floating as you would with a solid wood panel. Solid wood panels should definitely not be fully glued in. You can safely put some glue in the centre of solid wood panels to keep them centred in the frame and to prevent rattling Well explained and documented Instructable. Well done.

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  • Bottle Cap Clock

    Love the idea. My only suggestion is to make all of the numbers 5. Cos it's five o'clock somewhere :)For those of you that have had a successful humour bypass; that was a joke. I'm not really an advocate of all day drinking. Though if you are bent out of shape on this, I might be persuaded to change my mind! :)

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  • I like the compactness of your design versus the one I built (see photo) that is made from the junkiest plywood salvaged from a crate a machine was shipped in to me 😏. There was no real "design" work on this. I just winged it. The cyclone is a $20 eBay item (and works really well) and the bucket is just a cheap item I bought at our nearest big-box store. The wheels were salvaged from other projects so were spare anyway. I probably spent less than $50 excluding the cyclone.Not as compact as your design but the advantage is that there are one less bend and way less plumbing between the cyclone and the vacuum. Without the strengthening ribs screwed on to the inside of the bucket, the bucket will collapse under the vacuum. This layout also follows me around pretty easily in the work…

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    I like the compactness of your design versus the one I built (see photo) that is made from the junkiest plywood salvaged from a crate a machine was shipped in to me 😏. There was no real "design" work on this. I just winged it. The cyclone is a $20 eBay item (and works really well) and the bucket is just a cheap item I bought at our nearest big-box store. The wheels were salvaged from other projects so were spare anyway. I probably spent less than $50 excluding the cyclone.Not as compact as your design but the advantage is that there are one less bend and way less plumbing between the cyclone and the vacuum. Without the strengthening ribs screwed on to the inside of the bucket, the bucket will collapse under the vacuum. This layout also follows me around pretty easily in the workshop and is very stable.One of these days, I will get around to putting other DC accessories under the vacuum. At the moment this is kind of a waste of space that your design eliminates. I offer this not as a criticism of your work, but as an alternative design layout option for others if space is not at an absolute premium.

    I like the compactness of your design versus the one I built (see photo) that is made from the junkiest plywood salvaged from a crate a machine was shipped in to me 😏. There was no real "design" work on this. I just winged it. The cyclone is a $20 eBay item (and works really well) and the bucket is just a cheap item I bought at our nearest big-box store. The wheels were salvaged from other projects so were spare anyway. I probably spent less than $50 excluding the cyclone.Not as compact as your design but the advantage is that there are one less bend and way less plumbing between the cyclone and the vacuum. Without the strengthening ribs screwed on to the inside of the bucket, the bucket will collapse under the vacuum. This layout also follows me around pretty easily in the work…

    see more »

    I like the compactness of your design versus the one I built (see photo) that is made from the junkiest plywood salvaged from a crate a machine was shipped in to me 😏. There was no real "design" work on this. I just winged it. The cyclone is a $20 eBay item (and works really well) and the bucket is just a cheap item I bought at our nearest big-box store. The wheels were salvaged from other projects so were spare anyway. I probably spent less than $50 excluding the cyclone.Not as compact as your design but the advantage is that there are one less bend and way less plumbing between the cyclone and the vacuum. Without the strengthening ribs screwed on to the inside of the bucket, the bucket will collapse under the vacuum. This layout also follows me around pretty easily in the workshop and is very stable.One of these days, I will get around to putting other DC accessories under the vacuum. At the moment this is kind of a waste of space that your design eliminates. I offer this not as a criticism of your work, but as an alternative design layout option for others if space is not at an absolute premium.

    I like the compactness of your design versus the one I built (see photo) that is made from the junkiest plywood salvaged from a crate a machine was shipped in to me 😏. There was no real "design" work on this. I just winged it. The cyclone is a $20 eBay item (and works really well) and the bucket is just a cheap item I bought at our nearest big-box store. The wheels were salvaged from other projects so were spare anyway. I probably spent less than $50 excluding the cyclone.Not as compact as your design but the advantage is that there are one less bend and way less plumbing between the cyclone and the vacuum. Without the strengthening ribs screwed on to the inside of the bucket, the bucket will collapse under the vacuum. This layout also follows me around pretty easily in the work…

    see more »

    I like the compactness of your design versus the one I built (see photo) that is made from the junkiest plywood salvaged from a crate a machine was shipped in to me 😏. There was no real "design" work on this. I just winged it. The cyclone is a $20 eBay item (and works really well) and the bucket is just a cheap item I bought at our nearest big-box store. The wheels were salvaged from other projects so were spare anyway. I probably spent less than $50 excluding the cyclone.Not as compact as your design but the advantage is that there are one less bend and way less plumbing between the cyclone and the vacuum. Without the strengthening ribs screwed on to the inside of the bucket, the bucket will collapse under the vacuum. This layout also follows me around pretty easily in the workshop and is very stable.One of these days, I will get around to putting other DC accessories under the vacuum. At the moment this is kind of a waste of space that your design eliminates. I offer this not as a criticism of your work, but as an alternative design layout option for others if space is not at an absolute premium.

    I like the compactness of your design versus the one I built (see photo) that is made from the junkiest plywood salvaged from a crate a machine was shipped in to me 😏. There was no real "design" work on this. I just winged it. The cyclone is a $20 eBay item (and works really well) and the bucket is just a cheap item I bought at our nearest big-box store. The wheels were salvaged from other projects so were spare anyway. I probably spent less than $50 excluding the cyclone.Not as compact as your design but the advantage is that there are one less bend and way less plumbing between the cyclone and the vacuum. Without the strengthening ribs screwed on to the inside of the bucket, the bucket will collapse under the vacuum. This layout also follows me around pretty easily in the work…

    see more »

    I like the compactness of your design versus the one I built (see photo) that is made from the junkiest plywood salvaged from a crate a machine was shipped in to me 😏. There was no real "design" work on this. I just winged it. The cyclone is a $20 eBay item (and works really well) and the bucket is just a cheap item I bought at our nearest big-box store. The wheels were salvaged from other projects so were spare anyway. I probably spent less than $50 excluding the cyclone.Not as compact as your design but the advantage is that there are one less bend and way less plumbing between the cyclone and the vacuum. Without the strengthening ribs screwed on to the inside of the bucket, the bucket will collapse under the vacuum. This layout also follows me around pretty easily in the workshop and is very stable.One of these days, I will get around to putting other DC accessories under the vacuum. At the moment this is kind of a waste of space that your design eliminates. I offer this not as a criticism of your work, but as an alternative design layout option for others if space is not at an absolute premium.

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  • Nicely done. Got my vote :)When I use printed templates, I glue them on with stick paper/craft glue that you can get at an office supplies store. It's a lot easier to clean up than PVA.You can also print these yourself with a tool. though not free but is very modestly priced, called BigPrint by Matthias Wandel. Here is a link: https://woodgears.ca/bigprint/. There may be alternatives out there that I don't know about but it has worked well enough for me.

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  • Thank you for the kind compliments.You are correct in your observation. I use that to strop edge tools as I am working. As for Australian Red Cedar (ARC); I can definitely understand why it was so popular with early Australian cabinet and furniture makers. It is a beautiful timber to work with hand tools. Other furniture items made with ARC are quite durable enough. Also quite light. ARC was also used extensively in early Australian homes for joinery and mouldings. It would be delight to use with traditional moulding planes.The trees themselves are difficult to grow commercially. It is near impossible to grow them in plantations in Australia due to Cedar Tip Moths (Hypsipyla robusta) that are native to Australia. Ironically, the best plantation sources of this timber are outside of Austra…

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    Thank you for the kind compliments.You are correct in your observation. I use that to strop edge tools as I am working. As for Australian Red Cedar (ARC); I can definitely understand why it was so popular with early Australian cabinet and furniture makers. It is a beautiful timber to work with hand tools. Other furniture items made with ARC are quite durable enough. Also quite light. ARC was also used extensively in early Australian homes for joinery and mouldings. It would be delight to use with traditional moulding planes.The trees themselves are difficult to grow commercially. It is near impossible to grow them in plantations in Australia due to Cedar Tip Moths (Hypsipyla robusta) that are native to Australia. Ironically, the best plantation sources of this timber are outside of Australia.

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    • Repairing a Victorian Balloon Back Chair
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  • Thank you for the compliment.The hardest thing to acquire is the confidence to have a go. These chairs were broken for a while until I had the confidence.

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  • boffincentral followed metalworking, tools, furniture, gadgets and 10 others channel
  • Luthiers use this method to bend the ribs into the shapes for guitars and the violin family. The bending iron they use usually has a greater diameter for the same reason you mentioned. Google homemade bending iron guitar for hundreds of images and ideas!

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  • You might be able to get away without using a threaded insert by tapping a thread in the wood insert directly. You might be surprised how strong threaded wood is.I just mount the tap directly in my cordless drill and have at it. I do drill the hole smaller than I would for tapping metal though. As long as the tap can be driven through the drill, the hole is big enough.Nice Instructable. Thanks.

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  • Love your tape measure :)I like the idea. I use recycled wood in projects wherever appropriate and possible. One of the concerns is hidden metal fasteners. I have a commercial metal detector but it is not particularly accurate in locating metal in wood, but it does give you a general idea which means I end up cutting well around it. It just isn't worth fragging a $100+ saw blade with a connection to save a centimetre (or even a decimetre) of wood!I'm glad you made this without the 3D printer. I don't have one and I frankly probably would not have thought of using conduit for this build so I would not have even thought to try this.Nicely done.Thanks.

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  • boffincentral commented on Mikhandmaker.'s instructable Sanding Saw

    Nice execution. I really like it. If you can source it locally, Cloth backed sandpaper is available in rolls and widths that would mean you would not need the the leather strip. I think cloth backed sandpaper would be easier to tension too. Less moving parts. Using cloth backed sandpaper you could also simplify the way the paper is held. A simple handsaw cut at an angle would probably be enough.

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  • Titan missiles are only briefly in contact with wood :) Japanese craftsmen use Camellia oil which is a light vegetable based oil that does not polymerise. I have used it but I have found it insufficient for my location and conditions. There is a saltwater pool in my back garden that the prevailing winds in this locality travel over on their way to my workshop (aka, the garage). The humidity in the summer here is frequently over 80% and rarely under 65%.These days I use Jojoba oil. I have an oily cloth hanging off the tail vise of my bench that has been continually used and Jojoba oil added to as needed. Jojoba oil will polymerise over time but it is easy to clean off. I just wipe it with the same oily cloth until the polymerised oil has buffed off.I also use wax on plane bodies (a plain b…

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    Titan missiles are only briefly in contact with wood :) Japanese craftsmen use Camellia oil which is a light vegetable based oil that does not polymerise. I have used it but I have found it insufficient for my location and conditions. There is a saltwater pool in my back garden that the prevailing winds in this locality travel over on their way to my workshop (aka, the garage). The humidity in the summer here is frequently over 80% and rarely under 65%.These days I use Jojoba oil. I have an oily cloth hanging off the tail vise of my bench that has been continually used and Jojoba oil added to as needed. Jojoba oil will polymerise over time but it is easy to clean off. I just wipe it with the same oily cloth until the polymerised oil has buffed off.I also use wax on plane bodies (a plain beeswax based furniture wax) and that has the added advantage of lubricating the sole in use. I have not had any problems getting a finish to adhere afterwards. There would only be a teeny tiny trace amount left after contact with the plane. I use Jojoba oil on the other plane components.My fine hand tools are in a wooden tool box I made many years ago. This box has small drawers similar to a machinist's chest like those sold by Gerstner.This strategy seems to work well enough; but the best way you can look after your tools is to use them. Tools that are used will get the most attention. And it's fun to use them :)

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  • Well you can, and there are such things around. If you search for long tail bikes you will find examples (commercially available and home made) with your search engine of choice. The downside of long tail bikes is you end up with a really really long chain. This style of cargo bike (also known as a bakfiet) probably originated in the Netherlands (though I could be wrong about that point) and is very popular there. In my opinion, keeping the transmission side of things simple is probably the easiest method for a home builder. With a long tail bike, alignment of the chain line for a home builder could be problematic.

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  • You're right about chopping mortises being loud!I wear hearing protection when doing it these days. My hearing has been damaged from my service in the Navy and I want to preserve what I have left!

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  • Great idea. I like the simplicity. You might also find a bow sander useful for the work you do. There are plenty of examples on the net but the concept is simple enough.

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