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  • christensent commented on christensent's instructable Build a Fusion Reactor2 weeks ago
    Build a Fusion Reactor

    Something like 1" ID tube for mechanical pump to diffusion backing (but this should be sized to meet the requirements of whatever pump you use, for most small diffusion pumps this would be an appropriate size), then a variety of KF and conflat direct connections to the chamber (mostly 2.75" conflat size or the approximate KF equivalents)

    I used a baffle right above the diff pump. A cold trap would be better but is totally overkill and unnecessary for an amateur DIY fusion effort.

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  • christensent commented on christensent's instructable Build a Fusion Reactor2 weeks ago
    Build a Fusion Reactor

    No, the schematic includes all valves I used

    It's unlikely the device could handle that kind of power. Also flyback systems usually have a terrible output impedance curve, such that when you actually draw 5mA from a design like that you only have a few kilovolts left.It is possible to make a ferrite based power supply that operates a fusor, that's what any professional lab-grade HV supply is. I just really doubt that particular design is going to do it for you.

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  • christensent commented on christensent's instructable Build a Fusion Reactor2 weeks ago
    Build a Fusion Reactor

    Nothing special, just a general purpose ball valve. This valve is always wide open when running the system in typical conditions so you don't need anything special.

    Actually as a follow up from watching through that video, there is zero chance you'll get measurable fusion, and even for a demo fusor you'd get virtually no plasma. Just not enough power coming out of that supply.

    If you actually want to achieve fusion, I seriously doubt that would have useful amounts of power. For a demo fusor (not actually doing fusion), you could get some plasma out of it.

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  • christensent commented on christensent's instructable Build a Fusion Reactor2 months ago
    Build a Fusion Reactor

    No, the reactor puts out something like a millionth of a watt, and there's no practical system to capture that energy so you get nothing. Even if you could capture it, this power is so low that for example, it'd take well over an entire human lifetime to charge a cellphone once.

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  • christensent commented on christensent's instructable Build a Fusion Reactor2 months ago
    Build a Fusion Reactor

    Sort of, it'd be highly sub optimal because fusion pressure is around 5-10 microns. Usually these pumps take a very long time to reach that 6 micron pressure you mention, so to get the atmosphere in there mostly deuterium it'd be difficult but if the chamber is really leak free probably possible. I don't recommend this method if actually achieving good fusion results is the goal.

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  • christensent commented on christensent's instructable Build a Fusion Reactor3 months ago
    Build a Fusion Reactor

    You will not get any measurable fusion. You need 15-20kV to get any fusion with a fairly high end detection system, and 25-30kV to detect any fusion with a typical low end neutron detection system (small BF3/He3 tube, silver activation, or BTI bubble detector would be the typical options available to someone starting out).

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  • christensent commented on christensent's instructable Build a Fusion Reactor3 months ago
    Build a Fusion Reactor

    The tungsten is heated by wasted energy input. It appears to heat fast because it has very little thermal mass so it takes little time to start glowing.The vast majority of the generated energy (in the form of neutron radiation) passes through the stainless steel chamber and is eventually absorbed by surrounding materials outside the reactor.

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  • christensent commented on christensent's instructable Build a Fusion Reactor4 months ago
    Build a Fusion Reactor

    I don't really know how hot it gets, my only basis for saying is that steel grids melt at full power, so somewhere between 1500C and 3400C.Total fusion output is around a microwatt or less. So it's nearly a billion times inefficient. Yes, in pure theory, if you captured ALL thermal loss plus the neutrons, you could run it forever (put in 400 watts, get 400.000001 watts out). In reality, there is currently and never will be any technology for thermal energy capture efficient enough to make this practical (you'd need a 99.999999%+ efficient thermal waste collector). So it truly is "in theory". In practice, a reactor like this will absolutely never be practical for energy generation or self-powered operation.

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  • christensent commented on christensent's instructable Build A Fusion Reactor5 months ago
    Build A Fusion Reactor

    Yes, it has been done. 2.75" crosses are generally too small to handle the thermal load of a several hundred watt fusor, the grid will be tiny, and you'd be lucky to get more than 20-30kV in before something arcs over. But purely to achieve fusion, yes it can be done. A 6" spherical chamber is hugely more effective and will result in much higher fusion rates.

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  • christensent commented on christensent's instructable Build A Fusion Reactor6 months ago
    Build A Fusion Reactor

    Not to my knowledge

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  • christensent commented on christensent's instructable Build A Fusion Reactor7 months ago
    Build A Fusion Reactor

    What's the point of 99% of things on this website? The point is to do it. If this is a waste of resources, it seems you're missing the whole point of the maker community.

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  • christensent commented on christensent's instructable Build A Fusion Reactor1 year ago
    Build A Fusion Reactor

    Depends on your goals and schedule. Between 1k and 10k generally, with a very common spot in the 2-4k range.

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