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clothier_bruce

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  • Very nice job: however, I'm in the UK and dont know what you mean by 'joint compound'.

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  • The motor in a cordless drill is a simple DC permanent magnet type. There is NO correct voltage for them: too low and you lose the advantage of the torque they are capable of. As the voltage gets higher, you get better torque, but increased heat. The voltage 'recommended' is a compromise between performance and the risk of overheating. BUT, the range of useable voltages is big: a '12V' motor could probably handle 24V unless it was really hammered, something most users dont do. So, a 12V drill could safely operate on a 14V lithium battery. Probably best if you dont plug it in the mains.

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  • clothier_bruce commented on kenyer's instructable Home Made Sock Shoes

    Do you have a dog by any chance? looks like it ripped a chunk out of the left shoe

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  • You said that the flame goes out when the oxygen level goes down to 30%. But the starting level of oxygen in air is only 20%

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  • This is a very poor 'Ible: First, there is already lots of stuff out there about salvaging electronics, so you'r adding nothing new. And then you make a terrible howler ( which shows your knowledge of electronics is amateurish at best ). The device which reads the disc is a laser diode: the device you show is an optical sensor.

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  • Not sure what a Cricut is. How did you sand-blast? Theres an instructable for a DIY sandblaster, though I have no idea if it could do this job.

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  • Looks like a nice hack to me and I picked up a trick or two on how to work with metal sheet, so thanks for that. For the purposes it is to be used for, I suspect some wood battens and some thin plywood sheet would be an easier build and probably cheaper. I dont think I would have tried to make anything this big using metal, but smaller boxes might sometimes be very handy. And now I know it can be done without specialist equipment, so nice one.

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      • (Yet Another) DIY Arduino Robotics Platform- a Robot Chassis From Spare Parts
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  • Congratulations for actually getting something done: like a lot of folks, I have grandiose schemes which never see the light of day. But, I do have two suggestions for you. ONE: your choice of motor isn't good. It's a very underpowered type for the application IMO. I'd have used a scrap cordless drill motor: they have tremendous torque and the World is awash with free ones. TWO; ditch those awful limit switches. Years ago I came across an ingenious idea for limiting motor travel without a mechanical switch. I wont bore you with the details, but you have a sense resistor and a simple op-amp feedback loop. At the travel limit, the system meets resistance and the motor begins to stall. The current rises and the electronics turns it off. Simple-s.

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  • I have no intention of being 'nice'. This is posted as an instructable, but the instructions have to be paid for. Piss off and put it on Ebay.

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  • You should do something about the title: it says a 'safety-cage' so I thought it was a vehicle safety cage ( those big metal bars in case the vehicle rolls over.) That's because the rest of the sentence is meaningless since you missed the 'y' from Battery. I had to slug through the script until the penny dropped.

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  • Very nice project although I wouldn't go to all that effort myself for a bed: I would have stuck to the mattress on the floor. It's a very large base area if that is a double mattress so you need a bloody big bedroom which not a lot of people have. But it sure is different and looks cool. I think you have a mistake in the first set of drawings. It baffled me for a bit: the 'vertebrae' don't have a slot marked so I couldn't see how it could fit together.

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  • A car battery is referred to as '12V', but that figure isn't meant to be taken literally: it depends. When you charge it up the voltage needed is 14 to 15V. Modern chargers are sophisticated electronic devices and who knows what they get up to, but for electrolysis you'd want an old-fashioned el cheapo charger. The maximum current would depend on how expensive and heavy it was: a big one might do around 10A, but I think most bog-standard chargers opted for around 4A. But cheap chargers ( all you need for this ) were just a transformer and rectifier bridge. which gave dirty DC as there was no capacitor. For crude charging this was perfectly OK and also perfectly OK for electrolysis. The disadvantage for a battery was that the voltage output was about 18V open-circuit. This figure also has …

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    A car battery is referred to as '12V', but that figure isn't meant to be taken literally: it depends. When you charge it up the voltage needed is 14 to 15V. Modern chargers are sophisticated electronic devices and who knows what they get up to, but for electrolysis you'd want an old-fashioned el cheapo charger. The maximum current would depend on how expensive and heavy it was: a big one might do around 10A, but I think most bog-standard chargers opted for around 4A. But cheap chargers ( all you need for this ) were just a transformer and rectifier bridge. which gave dirty DC as there was no capacitor. For crude charging this was perfectly OK and also perfectly OK for electrolysis. The disadvantage for a battery was that the voltage output was about 18V open-circuit. This figure also has to be understood: the transformer was 'loose-coupled' so the current became self-limiting - a safety trick. Nevertheless, if the battery was left permanently attached, it boiled dry as these cheap chargers didn't go into trickle-mode. For that you need some electronics. Bottom line: an old cheap battery charger is a lousy battery charger - buy a nice electronic one. But it would be a terrific choice for basic electrolysis.

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  • It's a decent instructable, but spoiled by the use of a meaningless term for the solvent. The term 'mineral spirits' has no concrete scientific interpretation and may refer to a proprietry product you can buy easily in the US, but isn't sold under that name in the UK. Here we have water-immiscible solvents like turps and white spirit although what they are exactly I don't know. I guess they're products of the petroleum fractionation industry, just like petrol and diesel. Then we have water-miscible solvents like the various alcohols: methyl, ethyl, iso-propyl ( even butanol, I think ). The stuff we call 'meths' AFAIK is actually ETHYL alcohol with about 5% methy alcohol ( the purple colour is pyridine which stinks ) If you are able to buy 'alcohol' I think it's ethyl alcohol plus 5% wate…

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    It's a decent instructable, but spoiled by the use of a meaningless term for the solvent. The term 'mineral spirits' has no concrete scientific interpretation and may refer to a proprietry product you can buy easily in the US, but isn't sold under that name in the UK. Here we have water-immiscible solvents like turps and white spirit although what they are exactly I don't know. I guess they're products of the petroleum fractionation industry, just like petrol and diesel. Then we have water-miscible solvents like the various alcohols: methyl, ethyl, iso-propyl ( even butanol, I think ). The stuff we call 'meths' AFAIK is actually ETHYL alcohol with about 5% methy alcohol ( the purple colour is pyridine which stinks ) If you are able to buy 'alcohol' I think it's ethyl alcohol plus 5% water: pure ethanol isnt available to the public. And 'dry-cleaning' solvent is ( as the guy said ) trichlorethanol. The chlorinated alcohols are another brand of solvents, but I don't think they come from petroleum distillation. None of them is water miscible. So, what is mineral spirit?

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  • Nice idea, but how much would a commercially-built unit be? To make it you need to buy about 300 quids-worth of gear plus new expensive batteries.

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  • I suspect the bottle you used was made of HDPE ( if so it will have a little triangle with a '2' inside it ) If so, then you wont get the blades to stick using hot glue

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  • First off, the voltage rating on a DC motor is pretty meaningless. You can run a 12V motor on twice, three or four times it's rated voltage. The voltage rating is conservative: it's the voltage at which it will run all day without overheating. At a higher voltage you run the risk of overheating, but most toys get intermittent use and you could always fix an in-line thermal fuse. One option is to use three 6V batteries (18V). There are so many battery types and sizes you could try all sorts of things, provided you can cram them in the available space. If the toy is old, then you can get brutal with it and hack the bodywork about to achieve your goal. If it goes much faster than before, he isn't going to worry about it looking a bit naff

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  • Can you really bend a long, straight heating element like that without wrecking the inside? Sounds brilliant, but too good to be true.

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  • Hi, interesting project. The bit I am particularly interested in is the lazarus effect on the batteries. I have tried the car-battery trick, but never convinced it did much good. The 'banging on the desk' trick is new to me. I don't know if your batteries are now really any good or whether you have convinced yourself they are. Sorry to sound cynical, but it's the sort of thing people do.

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  • Something doesn't add up here: a brushed motor has 2 wires, not three.

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  • I really like this one and I'm going to try to make one myself one day. The difficult bit is the logo painting; notoriously difficult to get right. I have one suggestion: I wonder if it would be more comfy if the back had a slight rake on it, maybe 15 deg.

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  • It depends on why you're doing this. If you're off-grid, or just like candle flames, then OK. But a single, modern white LED will generate as much light as your candle at around 25mA. Your candle costs around 10 cents/Hr. If we make a LOT of assumptions and approximations, electricity costs ( in the UK ) about 15p/ KWhr. The LED consumes around 0.4 KWhr, or 6 pence/hr. The exchange is such that you could say that equates to 6 cents/hr. Basically it costs much the same for oil-lamp or LED, although, if you're on-grid, you're paying a standing charge as well, so it sort of pays to use their electricity as well.One way of making the oil-lamp cheaper ( one which I might just try) is to nick some of the used cooking-oil thrown out by food outlets. It tends to be disgusting stuff; full of soli…

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    It depends on why you're doing this. If you're off-grid, or just like candle flames, then OK. But a single, modern white LED will generate as much light as your candle at around 25mA. Your candle costs around 10 cents/Hr. If we make a LOT of assumptions and approximations, electricity costs ( in the UK ) about 15p/ KWhr. The LED consumes around 0.4 KWhr, or 6 pence/hr. The exchange is such that you could say that equates to 6 cents/hr. Basically it costs much the same for oil-lamp or LED, although, if you're on-grid, you're paying a standing charge as well, so it sort of pays to use their electricity as well.One way of making the oil-lamp cheaper ( one which I might just try) is to nick some of the used cooking-oil thrown out by food outlets. It tends to be disgusting stuff; full of solids. Mind you, a bit of simple filtering and the stuff is free. Maybe worth a try.

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  • clothier_bruce commented on stoppi71's instructable Arduino Segway

    My question, too: why did the Arduino PWM O/P and a bridge cct not work? What does the commercial controller do that a basic DIY set-up not do?

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  • I think you're right: theres something horribly wrong with the wiring.

    OK, maybe I read it wrong - apologies.

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  • clothier_bruce commented on Ynze-'s instructable Electric Lighter

    The exact gauge of wire isn't that important. If you want thin wire, old hairdryers ( and theres loads about ) will have some. It doesn't need to be coiled up. What's important is to get the current to make it glow hot enough to ignite paper ( red-hot, around 1000 deg ). How? Well, it isn't as trivial as this 'ible implies: you need to do some homework. First get your wire, but you'll need to measure its diameter. Next look up tables on Google of wire gauge vs resistance and temperature vs. current. From the wire length you have the resistance and from the other table, how much current you need. From that you'll need to calculate the sort of voltage required. What you don't do is to start with something as hopeless as a PP3. You need something with balls: I'd use a Li-Ion 18650 or two. T…

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    The exact gauge of wire isn't that important. If you want thin wire, old hairdryers ( and theres loads about ) will have some. It doesn't need to be coiled up. What's important is to get the current to make it glow hot enough to ignite paper ( red-hot, around 1000 deg ). How? Well, it isn't as trivial as this 'ible implies: you need to do some homework. First get your wire, but you'll need to measure its diameter. Next look up tables on Google of wire gauge vs resistance and temperature vs. current. From the wire length you have the resistance and from the other table, how much current you need. From that you'll need to calculate the sort of voltage required. What you don't do is to start with something as hopeless as a PP3. You need something with balls: I'd use a Li-Ion 18650 or two. To assume that, if you have a PP3 battery ( nominal 9V ) and a 9 ohm piece of wire, you will draw 1 Amp shows this guy hasn't got much of a clue.

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  • I once built an anemometer. IIRC, I had an opto-slot and a segmented disc. No matter. There are many different hardware designs, but all have the same problem: how do you calibrate it?

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  • Nice hacks, but I was disappointed by the rope-shortener hack: I simply cannot understand how it's done and the pics are no help at all. Could you redo them, but get in much closer and make the process clearer. Thanks

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  • clothier_bruce commented on TomTechTod's instructable Tiny FM Spy Bug

    You are being crass and narrow-minded. The Imperial system isn't American, it comes from the UK and is centuries old - the USA is only a few hundred years old. The metric system has some advantages and is used in science and technology. I was in research for 40 years and never used anything else. But the Imperial system isn't some haphazard accident: it's a perfectly natural and obvious system which takes account of everyday observations: a man's foot is a convenient measure; a thumb-joint is similar. We then say let there be twelve thumb-joints in a foot and call it one inch. And so on and so on. And base 10 is only special if you happen to like it: base 12 has much going for it, being divisible by 2,3,4, and 6. Before you dismiss something as bollocks, perhaps you should be more aware…

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    You are being crass and narrow-minded. The Imperial system isn't American, it comes from the UK and is centuries old - the USA is only a few hundred years old. The metric system has some advantages and is used in science and technology. I was in research for 40 years and never used anything else. But the Imperial system isn't some haphazard accident: it's a perfectly natural and obvious system which takes account of everyday observations: a man's foot is a convenient measure; a thumb-joint is similar. We then say let there be twelve thumb-joints in a foot and call it one inch. And so on and so on. And base 10 is only special if you happen to like it: base 12 has much going for it, being divisible by 2,3,4, and 6. Before you dismiss something as bollocks, perhaps you should be more aware of its place in History.

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