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cp256

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  • Cheap Arduino Combat Robot Control

    Since it's my first foray into combat robots I didn't hardwire it as I expect to change a lot around as I mess around with it. I grabbed a SunFounder joystick board, which has sockets for an arduino Nano and nRF24L01 and comers with the joystick installed. I modified the code quite a bit while getting it working as the 8 pin socket for the nRF24L01 board had a bad connection. I still have to work on the low speed end of the driveability as it's either to fast or too slow. I have a bunch of motors kicking around so I need to see if one is suitable to cobble up a weapon of some kind. This is fun project to help me learn what I'm doing until I get a commercial R/C outfit.

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  • Magnetic Levitating Turbine - Tinkercad

    I know I am late to the party, but couldn't the needle be eliminated by using a longer turbine shaft, placing repelling magnets on each end and corresponding magnets on risers like the mirror stand to make it appear more truly floating?

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  • No-Fail Metal Plating With Kitchen Chemistry

    As real railroad signals are usually painted with silver paint, I think aluminum plating would look best and aluminum can be plated over brass.

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  • cp256 made the instructable DIY Police LED With PCBWAY
    DIY Police LED With PCBWAY

    I didn't buy a PC board, I just breadboarded it as I'm not trying to scare anyone or pretending to be a first responder. I just wanted to play around with it. I used a 1uF electrolytic cap instead of a 0.1uF. I only used a 16 ohm resistor on the red LEDs and a 2.2k one on the blue to somewhat balance the light output between the two banks. A good way to guesstimate is to turn out the lights and look at the reflections on the ceiling. A short vid of it in operation:

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  • cp256 made the instructable DIY Constant Current Load
    DIY Constant Current Load

    This project was just what I was looking for to test power supplies and Li-Ion batteries. Simple enough to build and capable of imposing a fairly reasonable load. LM358P op-amp, IRLZ44N MOSFET and a 500K pot. The two 50W resistors are 2 ohm and 4 ohm wired in parallel. The bigger heat sink was scavenged from a UPS and the smaller U shaped one is from an old computer power supply. I have a 30mm 12v fan running at 8v on the MOSFET heat sink. I had everything kicking around so this was a $0 project for me, the right price. The lower set of meters is a chinesium DC converter that is running the chip and fan and the upper set is a small DC power supply that is being load tested after being resto-modded from a vintage Kustom Kreations Model 504 12v power supply. I added a 3A buck-boost converte…

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    This project was just what I was looking for to test power supplies and Li-Ion batteries. Simple enough to build and capable of imposing a fairly reasonable load. LM358P op-amp, IRLZ44N MOSFET and a 500K pot. The two 50W resistors are 2 ohm and 4 ohm wired in parallel. The bigger heat sink was scavenged from a UPS and the smaller U shaped one is from an old computer power supply. I have a 30mm 12v fan running at 8v on the MOSFET heat sink. I had everything kicking around so this was a $0 project for me, the right price. The lower set of meters is a chinesium DC converter that is running the chip and fan and the upper set is a small DC power supply that is being load tested after being resto-modded from a vintage Kustom Kreations Model 504 12v power supply. I added a 3A buck-boost converter with front mounted 10k pot, 10A digital volt/ammeter, front jacks for the variable output and a rear mounted fuse holder. I replaced the output transistor with an LM317 set to 13.8v connected to the rear fixed voltage terminal (can charge 12v batteries or power automotive thingies) and feeding the DC converter. The big capacitor was ok, but the smaller 470uF one started leaking when I initially tested the stock unit so I replaced it. It isn't very powerful, but I have lots of other power supplies kicking around, all the way up to 30A.Once I come up with a suitable case I'll built the current loader on a PC board. I had intended to use the Kustom Kreations case for the load tester, but it surprised me by working so I got side tracked refurbishing it into a useful unit. As I told my wife, it led me straight down the rabbit hole and consumed a good chunk of my weekend!

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  • cp256 made the instructable LED Chaser Circuit Without IC
    LED Chaser Circuit Without IC

    Interesting exercise. It is built on a half breadboard as per the schematic, but I substituted a 220 ohm resistor for the three blue LEDs so they would be closer to the luminance of the yellow and green ones. It is also running at 8v instead of 9v

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  • cp256 made the instructable Make a Joule Thief
    Make a Joule Thief

    I used a 2N3904 transistor, 1K ohm resistor, 28 gauge 10 turn copper wound inductor and a 1.2 NiMH battery. I had several false starts with larger inductors and heavier wire before I found this smaller ferrite bead in an old 14.4k modem and found my spool of 28ga solid core wire. I started down this road because my wife got a "wind chime" for Christmas that dangles six acrylic hummingbirds with slow flash RGB LEDs powered by a pathetic AA 600mah NiMH battery charged by a tiny solar panel like you find on a cheap landscaping light. It discharged far too quickly and doesn't recharge on cloudy days. I replaced the battery with a 2850mah NiMH cell and added a larger USB solar panel that hooks up with a jack I installed. It lasts 6 nights without recharging, but I thought a Joule Thi…

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    I used a 2N3904 transistor, 1K ohm resistor, 28 gauge 10 turn copper wound inductor and a 1.2 NiMH battery. I had several false starts with larger inductors and heavier wire before I found this smaller ferrite bead in an old 14.4k modem and found my spool of 28ga solid core wire. I started down this road because my wife got a "wind chime" for Christmas that dangles six acrylic hummingbirds with slow flash RGB LEDs powered by a pathetic AA 600mah NiMH battery charged by a tiny solar panel like you find on a cheap landscaping light. It discharged far too quickly and doesn't recharge on cloudy days. I replaced the battery with a 2850mah NiMH cell and added a larger USB solar panel that hooks up with a jack I installed. It lasts 6 nights without recharging, but I thought a Joule Thief style circuit might extend that. I have some slow flash RGB LEDs and can gang up to test a replacement circuit but I needed to make a basic Joule Thief first. Now it is on to the six RGB LED version to see how long that one will last.

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  • Glass Jar Firefly (Beginner Arduino Project)

    This similar to a PWM circuit that I made for an electronic candle, which might work well for a firefly and extend battery life. I had one of those cheap LED candles that run off of a coin cell (like a 2025 or 2032), but it was constant brightness and didn't emulate a candle very well. I prototyped a flickering version with an arduino and 5 mm yellow LED that fits a flame shaped plastic cover from the cheapo candle. When the PWM code looked good I then built it with an ATtiny13a 8 pin 8-bit AVR microcontroller with a software PWM hack to minimize the current draw. It ranges from 4.3 to 6.5 milliamps when running with about 4.15 ma being used by the microcontroller. Still more than I'd like to have running from a couple of coin cells. Maybe a small LiPo battery would work ok, but then I wo…

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    This similar to a PWM circuit that I made for an electronic candle, which might work well for a firefly and extend battery life. I had one of those cheap LED candles that run off of a coin cell (like a 2025 or 2032), but it was constant brightness and didn't emulate a candle very well. I prototyped a flickering version with an arduino and 5 mm yellow LED that fits a flame shaped plastic cover from the cheapo candle. When the PWM code looked good I then built it with an ATtiny13a 8 pin 8-bit AVR microcontroller with a software PWM hack to minimize the current draw. It ranges from 4.3 to 6.5 milliamps when running with about 4.15 ma being used by the microcontroller. Still more than I'd like to have running from a couple of coin cells. Maybe a small LiPo battery would work ok, but then I would have to build in a charging port/system of some kind. I have one from a bluetooth headset I upgraded that might work...

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  • Overview the Arduino Sketch Uploading Process and ISP

    I have had varying levels of success with all sorts of ISPs. I am looking forward to trying even more methods!

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