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1Instructables13,635Views6CommentsEagle, IDJoined January 18th, 2016
Builder / Clinician / Analyst / Writer now trying to become a maker.

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  • How to Fix a Hole in a Hollow Core Door

    The only place I can find a door similar to mine for that kind of price is the local Habitat for Humanity Re-Store which sells them second-hand, already mortised and drilled for some other jamb. Remember also that I had 5 door surfaces to repair, and there is enough product in the Great Stuff and Bondo cans for probably 20+ door surface repairs. In addition, these are great products to have around for other projects, so the cost is amortized across all projects you use them for. In addition, hanging a new door correctly in an existing jamb is not an easy DIY task. So the total cost of the new door has to include the skilled labor (yours or someone else's) that it takes to hang it.

    As you and zap88 have pointed out, Bondo All-Purpose Putty is a polyester/styrene-based product, not actually epoxy. I have changed the description in the instructable. But the Bondo All-Purpose Putty that I used is not the Bondo glass-reinforced filler that you refer to. According to Bondo's marketing literature (available: https://multimedia.3m.com/mws/media/1283791O/bondo-product-selector-guide.pdf ) it is a "Unique thicker formula designed for wall, furniture and other home repairs". The uses they list include "Drywall Repair, Concrete Cracks, Metal Gutters, Doors, Siding, Brick & Stone Repair, Furniture Repair". The odor of this putty was quite mild, although I did the repairs out in my garage with the doors open. I think Bondo intends this product to be a ...

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    As you and zap88 have pointed out, Bondo All-Purpose Putty is a polyester/styrene-based product, not actually epoxy. I have changed the description in the instructable. But the Bondo All-Purpose Putty that I used is not the Bondo glass-reinforced filler that you refer to. According to Bondo's marketing literature (available: https://multimedia.3m.com/mws/media/1283791O/bondo-product-selector-guide.pdf ) it is a "Unique thicker formula designed for wall, furniture and other home repairs". The uses they list include "Drywall Repair, Concrete Cracks, Metal Gutters, Doors, Siding, Brick & Stone Repair, Furniture Repair". The odor of this putty was quite mild, although I did the repairs out in my garage with the doors open. I think Bondo intends this product to be a competitor to fast-hardening drywall compound and floor fix products. It would certainly work well for that. In this instance, including the Trade and Product name for the material I used is important in the instructable because there are similarly named products that would not be as suitable, as you point out.The Bondo Fiberglass Resin was a little bit thicker than acrylic casting resins that I have used before, but I was working with the door flat on sawhorses, so a thinner resin would also be easily controllable for this purpose. I have never tried casting Fiberglass Resin material in a deep mold, so in that case an acrylic casting resin might be a better choice, I don't know. But either one could work for this thin layer to copy the wood grain texture.

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  • csledbetter's instructable How to Fix a Hole in a Hollow Core Door's weekly stats: 2 months ago
    • How to Fix a Hole in a Hollow Core Door
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      22 comments
  • How to Fix a Hole in a Hollow Core Door

    This method works for paint grade doors because the resin texture needs to be painted to match the rest of the door. A hole in a hollow core door that has a wood veneer that has been stained and finished would be much harder to repair satisfactorily. I would either replace the entire door skin and refinish it or, more likely, buy a new door and stain and finish to match. I know of no tricks to make that easier.

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  • How to Fix a Hole in a Hollow Core Door

    That is a very good point charlessenf-gm. If only one door in my house was damaged, I may have decided to buy a new one and re-hang it (I have the tools and experience to hang a door, but not everyone can do that). But I had 5 damaged doors and some Bondo and Great Stuff left over from other projects. I was not sure this would work so well when I started, but was pleased with the results. I was not aware that standard Great Stuff could expand so much that it can warp window and door frames. I think it worked fine here because there is so much room for expansion in the hollow door and out the damaged hole. The door skins did not bulge out.

    Thanks, zap88. I did not know Bondo All-Purpose Putty was not epoxy. It does make sense because it was nice to sand down when I had to. (Yes, my first try was too lumpy and I sanded it off for a do-over). Epoxy might be so hard that sanding would not be so easy. At any rate, the Bondo was perfect for this purpose.

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