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  • Bicycle BoosterPack: a 3D Printed Portable Electric Assist

    A little update -- I managed to get everything all put together and mounted on my bike, and then I found I'd neglected to properly restrict the motion of the motor arm. When I turned the motor on, it pushed into the tire and then up and past it, cracking the PLA motor mount.I reprinted all structural parts in solid PETG, which has a little flex, more heat resistance, and seems far more sturdy than PLA. I mounted the boost to the bike, restricted the motor arm so that it couldn't swing through the contact point with the tire, and went for a ride.Got about half a block in before the V-ESC stopped responding. I think it might have burned out a drive chip. I'll have to do some investigating. So in answer to the person who asked whether I figured out how to program the V-ESC for this applica...

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    A little update -- I managed to get everything all put together and mounted on my bike, and then I found I'd neglected to properly restrict the motion of the motor arm. When I turned the motor on, it pushed into the tire and then up and past it, cracking the PLA motor mount.I reprinted all structural parts in solid PETG, which has a little flex, more heat resistance, and seems far more sturdy than PLA. I mounted the boost to the bike, restricted the motor arm so that it couldn't swing through the contact point with the tire, and went for a ride.Got about half a block in before the V-ESC stopped responding. I think it might have burned out a drive chip. I'll have to do some investigating. So in answer to the person who asked whether I figured out how to program the V-ESC for this application -- my answer would be that I am not sure I did it right. I did find that I had to connect the motor sensors to the board and configure the V-ESC in hybrid mode for it to reliably start up the motor.Anyway, my boosterpack is back on the workbench.

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  • Bicycle BoosterPack: a 3D Printed Portable Electric Assist

    Finally got back to this project, hooked it all up, got the throttle button working with no need for the servo tester using kbob2's helpful recipe for the V-ESC. It spins great, except that once every few times I hit the button, the motor rattles rather than spinning -- am tempted to wire up the sensor to the V-ESC and have it run in hybrid mode so that it uses the sensor to start the motor more smoothly/reliably.I never bothered to thread any holes. The holes in my prints were very round, and the screws didn't have to do much work to self-thread their way into the PLA. No forcing or cracking occurred, so it didn't seem like anything was weakened by the process.I realized when I got to the point of mounting the pack to my bike that I'd rather use the mid-frame mount than the seat-post m...

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    Finally got back to this project, hooked it all up, got the throttle button working with no need for the servo tester using kbob2's helpful recipe for the V-ESC. It spins great, except that once every few times I hit the button, the motor rattles rather than spinning -- am tempted to wire up the sensor to the V-ESC and have it run in hybrid mode so that it uses the sensor to start the motor more smoothly/reliably.I never bothered to thread any holes. The holes in my prints were very round, and the screws didn't have to do much work to self-thread their way into the PLA. No forcing or cracking occurred, so it didn't seem like anything was weakened by the process.I realized when I got to the point of mounting the pack to my bike that I'd rather use the mid-frame mount than the seat-post mount so that I can keep my cargo rack installed. So now I'm printing two additional pieces.I did buy a watt meter, and am now wondering whether I should wire it up next to the battery so I can just go look at it on occasion when stopped, or run heavy-gauge power cable extensions to and from the handlebars so that I can see its display while riding.

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  • czyz followed MechEngineerMike2 years ago
  • Bicycle BoosterPack: A 3D Printed Portable Electric Assist

    I'm not an engineer, so am not sure what Ollin means by 27mm center to center. I measured 38mm, and the slots you've made n the 50mm motor mount just barely go wide enough. I think it'll work, though I haven't yet tried the new part.I've uploaded 3 photos of the motor here:https://flic.kr/s/aHskD2MsqjAnd did some measurements and created a crude model of the motor here:https://cad.onshape.com/documents/4159d6906d488ca3...I don't think the radial fan will fit over the bump on the end of the motor opposite the shaft -- it's 18mm in diameter and sticks out 6mm. I also don't think there are any threaded holes at that end of the motor for mounting the fan.

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  • Bicycle BoosterPack: A 3D Printed Portable Electric Assist

    That was quick! Got a reply from Ollin with this info:The mounting holes are 27mm across, center to center.  If you measure across the spindle it comes to 38mm.

    Interesting. I may thread the parts underwater if I end up having to thread them at all. Hot water annealing may also be something to look into for any parts that require higher heat tolerance or other properties that come with annealing. So far the holes in my parts have fit everything perfectly without needing to be drilled, but I haven't yet gotten to those 1/4 20 holes.My Ollin 5065 motor arrived yesterday so I finally started assembly. And as it turns out that neither the 50mm motor swing arm nor the fan fit on this motor. I'm going to do some measuring to see whether the 60mm parts would fit. I've also written Ollin to ask if they have any specifications of the housing design or files available that might help.A link to the motor -- seemed like it'd be perfect for this application...

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    Interesting. I may thread the parts underwater if I end up having to thread them at all. Hot water annealing may also be something to look into for any parts that require higher heat tolerance or other properties that come with annealing. So far the holes in my parts have fit everything perfectly without needing to be drilled, but I haven't yet gotten to those 1/4 20 holes.My Ollin 5065 motor arrived yesterday so I finally started assembly. And as it turns out that neither the 50mm motor swing arm nor the fan fit on this motor. I'm going to do some measuring to see whether the 60mm parts would fit. I've also written Ollin to ask if they have any specifications of the housing design or files available that might help.A link to the motor -- seemed like it'd be perfect for this application since it's sold for e-skateboard use, and the cost (YMMV due to shipping) was lower than the Maytech. http://www.ollinboardcompany.com/product/om5065-20...

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