author
182Comments

Tell us about yourself!

Achievements

100+ Comments Earned a bronze medal
course completion badge
Paper Mache ClassClass Complete!
course completion badge
Raspberry Pi ClassClass Complete!
course completion badge
Design Sketching ClassClass Complete!
  • eburman commented on HackerBoxes's instructable HackerBox 0058: Encode
    HackerBox 0058: Encode

    Keep at it. It seems a bit fidgety. I just kept redoing different things until it finally came to life. Check the FFC cable to make sure it's positioned and seated correctly. Make sure the wiring is actually connected to the right pins (they are labeled differently on either side, so that tripped me up). It will work.

    View Instructable »
  • eburman made the instructable HackerBox 0058: Encode
    HackerBox 0058: Encode

    An important message.....

    View Instructable »
  • eburman commented on HackerBoxes's instructable HackerBox 0058: Encode
    HackerBox 0058: Encode

    Yes, the laser flashes a red laser line across the image being scanned. It's very conspicuous and if you don't see it then something is wrong. I had the same problem but I found out that the pinouts on the ZIF connector are very confusing. They are labeled differently on either side of the board. See my comment above. Once I got it hooked up correctly then it worked. The other thing is you have to type something into the serial monitor and send it to get the scanner to start a scan.

    Damn you!!!

    View Instructable »
  • eburman commented on HackerBoxes's instructable HackerBox 0058: Encode
    HackerBox 0058: Encode

    I finally got the barcode scanner to work. It seems that the pins on one side my flex cable breakout module are labeled incorrectly. The pinouts as labeled on the ZIF connector side of the board are correct. The pinouts as labeled on the other side of the board are different and do not work if followed.

    View Instructable »
  • Simple Air Pollution Monitor Using an Arduino Uno and SDS011

    Day two. All systems go! PM2.5 has fallen today. Less smoke in the air this morning. But P10 values given by this module are still incorrect.

    View Instructable »
  • Simple Air Pollution Monitor Using an Arduino Uno and SDS011

    Great tutorial and very timely! I happened to have an SDS011 module sitting around which I had planned on experimenting with some day. Well, with all the fires in California, today is the day. I'm located in Coastal Humboldt County California. Smoke has been blowing in for days from all of the surrounding massive wildfires. As of 3PM today the PM2.5 is reading up in the 350 range which correlates well with other official and citizen scientist data from around here. Don't know what up with the PM10 reading. Seems way off.

    View Instructable »
  • eburman made the instructable HackerBox 0036: JumboTron
    HackerBox 0036: JumboTron

    I love it! I plan on putting it up in the back window of my car instead of a bumper sticker. I'll just have it running while I drive. That way maybe people will be less likely to vandalize my car when I'm not around.

    View Instructable »
  • HackerBox 0056: Demon Seed

    I found that the USBasp programmer wiring differed from the diagram provided in the Instructable. I switched SCK and MISO and I moved the GND. See diagram. That worked for me.

    View Instructable »
  • Dual Colour Bar Graph With CircuitPython

    Nice tutorial! I've got my order up on AliExpress for the Red Green bar graph and for a RYGB one too! I'll use your code as a spring board to figure out how to apply the RYGB unit. Thanks for the great idea?

    View Instructable »
  • HackerBox 0053: Chromalux

    You need to solder the header pins onto the GY-33.

    View Instructable »
  • eburman made the instructable HackerBox 0053: Chromalux
    HackerBox 0053: Chromalux

    Happy Easter All!

    View Instructable »
  • ThingSpeak, IFTTT, Temp and Humidity Sensor and Google Sheet

    Temp-ThinSpeak.ino code link is broken. Does not link to code.

    View Instructable »
  • FX2LP CY7C68013A USB Dev Board (Logic Analyzer)

    So far so good. The OSX version of PulseView seems to be working well on my MacBook. It recognized my Dev Board immediately and the demo sketch for the arduino is chooching away making sweet traces as it counts. Now it's time to dive in and figure out what this thing can really do. Thanks HackerBoxes and thanks wh_hsn! Great tutorial!

    View Instructable »
  • Chocolate Banana Muffins

    These are fantastic! Here's what they have going for them: 1. They're made from scratch. 2. They are relatively easy to make. A gratifying project for the novice baker. 3. They taste wonderful!

    Yes, you really should.

    View Instructable »
  • eburman made the instructable Chocolate Banana Muffins
    Chocolate Banana Muffins

    A successful family project. Fresh out of the oven and ready for our tummies.

    View Instructable »
  • Vacuum Fluorescent Display Watch

    I'm nearly ready to solder the ESP-32 module onto the board. I have a hot air reworking station and soldering iron. What would you recommend for the thermal pad on the underside of the module? Ignore it? Try to solder it from the underside of the PCB with a soldering iron? Use the hot air gun and solder paste (might overheat the module) or maybe use thermal paste instead of solder. Not sure how to proceed. How did you do it?

    View Instructable »
  • HackerBox 0043: Falken's Maze

    I did the same thing. I followed the pattern on the underside of the PCB which it turns out is the exact opposite of the way the transistors need to be oriented. Unsoldering 9 transistor leads is such a joy! I had sacrifice the transistors and snip off all the leads to get them unsoldered. Fortunately I had several more transistors in stock for replacemnt. So, the correct orientation is to have the flat side of the transistor facing the PCB so that it lays completely flat when bent down toward the board. Now the flashy thingy works fine.

    View Instructable »
  • HackerBox 0041: CircuitPython

    I sounds like you are starting out at ground level. Where are you getting stuck? Soldering? Identifying the parts? The kits are very simple and are good for beginners. I'd be happy to help but I don't know where you are getting stuck. Also, there is just tons of information available on the internet. Really just dive right in and hope for the best. You may be surprised when it all comes together and works!

    View Instructable »
  • HackerBox 0042: Worlds of WiFi

    I had a similar problem. I pulled out the multimeter and found that the voltage regulator wasn't working. There was no voltage going to the ESP or the OLED. I happened to have another similar 3.3V regulator in my junk box so I swapped it in. Everything worked fine after that.

    View Instructable »
  • eburman made the instructable HackerBox 0046: Persistence
    HackerBox 0046: Persistence

    Thanks to TimGTech for helping to show the way!

    View Instructable »
  • HackerBox 0046: Persistence

    Thanks for making this more simple and showing the way. Playing around with images and text now.

    View Instructable »
  • HackerBox 0046: Persistence

    Got it! You were right, I didn't follow your instructions carefully at first. It took me a while to figure out exactly what, where and how to cut and paste your bitmap example into, but I persisted and ultimately I prevailed! Thanks for the tutorial. Now I need to give the image converter program a try!

    View Instructable »
  • HackerBox 0046: Persistence

    It seems that the sources on Amazon are fleeting. Using the information that HB gave me, I was able to select appropriate 18650 cells, they took several weeks to arrive but they are working great. The seller is already gone or else I'd provide a link. I was lucky I guess. I didn't go for the cheapest. The cheaper they are the more likely they are to be junk/counterfeit.

    View Instructable »
  • HackerBox 0046: Persistence

    I tried your code but I get an error message saying that the sketch is too big.

    View Instructable »
  • HackerBox 0044: PCB 123

    Success! Here is how I got the final fuse burning step to work on my MacBook Pro:The terminal commands that HB suggested did not work on my computer: "avrdude -c arduino -p attiny85 -U lfuse:w:0xe2:m -U hfuse:w:0x5f:m -U efuse:w:0xff:m”My Mac terminal did not know where to find the avrdude application and it obstinately failed to recognize the avrdude command.The avrdude application was supposed to be located in “/usr/local/bin” and the config file in “etc.” But Arduino does not install the files on my computer where they need to be to work with the terminal. Avrdude is placed in completely different directories. I couldn’t figure out how to direct it to where Arduino had them located.So…I installed avrdude using instructions from this site: http://macappstore.org/avrdude/That was a …

    see more »

    Success! Here is how I got the final fuse burning step to work on my MacBook Pro:The terminal commands that HB suggested did not work on my computer: "avrdude -c arduino -p attiny85 -U lfuse:w:0xe2:m -U hfuse:w:0x5f:m -U efuse:w:0xff:m”My Mac terminal did not know where to find the avrdude application and it obstinately failed to recognize the avrdude command.The avrdude application was supposed to be located in “/usr/local/bin” and the config file in “etc.” But Arduino does not install the files on my computer where they need to be to work with the terminal. Avrdude is placed in completely different directories. I couldn’t figure out how to direct it to where Arduino had them located.So…I installed avrdude using instructions from this site: http://macappstore.org/avrdude/That was a little scary because for all I knew I was installing malware into my root directories. But I backed up my computer and gave it a shot. It worked and the files were where they needed to be. Now the terminal recognized the avrdude command. But running the commands to set the fuses resulted in an error: “ser_open(): can't open device "unknown": No such file or directory”So I added a specific command showing the serial port that arduino was using: “-P /dev/cu.Bluetooth-Incoming-Port”That worked but the then it couldn’t find my specific programmer: “avrdude: stk500_recv(): programmer is not responding”So I gave it the name of the programmer I was using: “-c USBasp”And that worked! The final successful terminal commands that I used for my MacBook Pro were: avrdude -c USBasp -P /dev/cu.Bluetooth-Incoming-Port -p attiny85 -U lfuse:w:0xe2:m -U hfuse:w:0x5f:m -U efuse:w:0xff:mI have no idea how I figured all that out but I guess three years of struggling my way through HackerBoxes has warped my brain. Maybe this will help someone else out.

    View Instructable »
  • HackerBox 0046: Persistence

    Same here. Whenever I search for 18650 Lithiums batteries there seems to be a multitude of sizes, voltages and AmpHours listed. I can be very uncertain. So, I've ordered some "18650's" from Amazon. They should be coming soon. If they fit then I'll post the link.

    View Instructable »
  • HackerBox 0044: PCB 123

    One other option is using the USBasp in circuit programmer. Unfortunately the a USBasp does is not included with this HackerBox. I used one that came with an earlier box (HB25 Flair Ware). If you've subscribed for a while like me then you can go back at get it. That worked well for me. I haven't tried the other methods yet. You could also order a USBasp on eBay or Aliexpress and when it arrives in a few months you can go back and revisit this project.

    View Instructable »
  • HackerBox 0044: PCB 123

    ESP32 Dev Module works for me.

    View Instructable »
  • HackerBox 0046: Persistence

    FYI: Your 18650 Lithium-Ion Amazon best seller link is broken. Is this a reasonable alternative? https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00HZV9TGS/ref=o...

    View Instructable »
  • HackerBox 0045: Spark Net

    I've found it difficult to get much traction with the nRF24L01 and Digispark Pro combo. I just can't get a clear understanding of how to code things with the RF24 system. Most of the good tutorials that I'm able to find use Arduino boards for the examples and also use the Arduino IDE serial monitor to communicate and debug the board. The Digispark Pro doesn't allow direct serial communication with the arduino IDE. I've tried using the DigiCDC library as a work around but I haven't been successful with that either. The DigiSpark shows up as a USBmodem but I've been unable to get it to send or receive data though the serial port. Also I wish that the DigiProNRF Circuit Boards had included 4x2 headers so that the nRF24L01 could be plugged in rather than permanently soldered in place. That…

    see more »

    I've found it difficult to get much traction with the nRF24L01 and Digispark Pro combo. I just can't get a clear understanding of how to code things with the RF24 system. Most of the good tutorials that I'm able to find use Arduino boards for the examples and also use the Arduino IDE serial monitor to communicate and debug the board. The Digispark Pro doesn't allow direct serial communication with the arduino IDE. I've tried using the DigiCDC library as a work around but I haven't been successful with that either. The DigiSpark shows up as a USBmodem but I've been unable to get it to send or receive data though the serial port. Also I wish that the DigiProNRF Circuit Boards had included 4x2 headers so that the nRF24L01 could be plugged in rather than permanently soldered in place. That way I could have removed the nRF24L01 to use with arduino boards rather the more difficult to understand and under-documented Digispark Pro combo. I'm setting this all aside for now. I've ordered some new nRF24L01's so that I can revisit it later using a simpler and easier to understand system.

    View Instructable »
  • Double Chocolate French Macarons

    Oh my Gawd. These came out beautifully. I made some with my daughter. The instructions were fantastic. The photos were essential. We forgot to take a photo before eating them up or else I'd post it. Great job with the tutorial!

    View Instructable »
  • HackerBox 0045: Spark Net

    So it turns out that it was an anomalous LED after all. Upon closer inspection, one of the two LED's provided was constructed so that the negative (anode/anvil) side is opposite to the flat side on the epoxy case. Sheesh! Just my luck! Why does this kind of stuff always happen to me?

    View Instructable »
  • HackerBox 0045: Spark Net

    Oddly, that just seem to be the case. I thought that maybe my perception of reality was clouded by my evening Tanqueray gin and tonic with extra lime. But today in a less clouded state of mind, there is just no doubt about it. According to the PCB I received, one side matches the flat side alignment and the other side most definitely does not. After perfecting my desoldering skills I finally got things up a blinking according to specs.

    View Instructable »
  • HackerBox 0045: Spark Net

    FYI Regarding BadgeBuddy. Such a simple project. Two LED's, a switch and a button battery holder. What could go wrong? Plenty! What ever you do, don't follow the LED profiles as they are printed on the PCB. Follow the written instructions exactly....INSERT FLASHING LEDs INTO FRONT OF PCB WITH SHORT PIN CLOSEST TO THE FLAT SIDE OF THE LED OUTLINE ON THE PCB.

    View Instructable »
  • Very nice tutorial! The PCB can be manufactured very inexpensively these days. I'm thinking of running your PCB design through JLCPCB. I have it waiting in my shopping cart but before a I drop $14 for 5 boards I'm wondering if you ever used your board design that's linked above to make sure that it works. You seem to imply that you never really checked it out.

    View Instructable »
  • There's a similar project posted on Electronoobs: https://electronoobs.com/eng_arduino_tut94_2.phpIs that one your's as well?

    View Instructable »
  • I've gotten several of these matrix boards. It seems that the mounts are not always included. The ones I have are actually magnetic mounts.

    View Instructable »
  • eburman commented on ChristineNZ's instructable VFD Alarm Clock

    I haven't actually tried programming the hardware yet. I'm just checking for errors using verify. It hitches up on line 28 where the SDA and SCL pins are assigned. I get the error message "no matching function for call to 'DS3231::DS3231(const unit8_t&, const unit8_t&)." There are a multitude of other error messages all related to the DS32331 RTC library. It's helpful to know that it works on your system. That implies that the problem is on my end. Maybe I have another conflicting library? I guess I'll just have to work through it.

    View Instructable »
  • eburman commented on ChristineNZ's instructable VFD Alarm Clock

    Note: Code does not compile using the DS3231 library that the Arduino library manager links to. Rather, I found that this library from Henning Karlsen http://www.rinkydinkelectronics.com/library.php?id... does compile. For more details see Instructables https://www.instructables.com/id/Real-time-clock-u... By the way I find that one of the most frustrating issues with these projects is trying to source all the libraries that people use. It sure would be helpful to provide links to non-standard libraries that are essential to get the code running. Otherwise, this is a fantastic project! Very creative. I've got several of these VFD tubes so I'm very glad that you took the time to share this.

    Hi. Thanks for looking into this. I'm the Arduino v1.8.9 app. The library manager does include the DS3231.h library that you used. There are two version and I tried both but neither will compile with your code. Oddly the library that I found and mentioned above seems to work well in your code and it does compile with that. But, since it's not the library that you used I can't be sure it will work as intended. Maybe there's something else wrong on my end. Also I googled the SparkFunBME280.h library and downloaded a library that came up. Hopefully it's the same one you used.

    View Instructable »
  • Yes that is working. I did have to correct a minor error in your code. The final latch block was outside the loop so I put it back in. I assume that's what you had intended because the red and green pixels are marching across the rows from one side to the other now. It's interesting to note that if I don't make sure to completely unplug the matrix board from all power sources before loading new code it will behave very erratically. I'm guessing that the shift registers have to be reset to their initial state or they will still be set to whatever state they were in before the new code was run. By the way, thanks for taking time to work through this with me. I'm learning a lot about how shift registers work by going through these exercises.

    Ta Da! You did it! It seems to be working now just as originally intended. Strong work!

    And the result is: green pixel and red pixel (column 31 green, column 30 red) on row zero. Same again on row 16. Also, corrected GREEN to HIGH. I usually order inexpensive Chinese parts through eBay or Banggood or Aliexpress. This time I ordered the panel through Adafruit. Much more expensive that way but I know that they offer consistantly high quality parts. Since this was a more complex project I wanted to eliminate any questions about the part being defective or incompatible. I guess it didn't work out that way though. But I I'm learning more this way.

    View Instructable »
  • I'm not sure what outcome I would be expecting but the above code as written results in two solid lines: Red at row one and Green at row 17. If I change OE from LOW to HIGH then I get a single very brief flash on the same two corresponding rows. Is that what I'm looking for?

    View Instructable »
  • Well I've given it a go but something is wrong. All that I get is a single pixel flashing down at one corner of the matrix panel. There is no light sweep occurring at all. I've been careful to use all of the same parts that you used. I ordered the 32x32 matrix panel through Adafruit. I'm using an authentic Arduino Uno. I'm even using TIL78 phototransistors just like you did, that I ordered through eBay and they are working fine. The serial plotter sketch show that my phototransistors are good. All of the RGB matrix panel example sketches are working perfectly as well (the plasma sketch is wild!). But, when I load the BasicMatrixScanner code......nothing. Is there maybe a bug that got into your code? Perhaps you could double check. Thanks!

    View Instructable »
  • Oh boy! Usually before I start a project I check to make sure that I understand how to use the code and that I can get the code to compile on my system before I invest a lot of money. I just now realized that I have no clear idea how to do this using PlatformIO. I may eventually be able to figure it out, but it's going to be a steep learning curve for me. You mention that you have used Arduino to write this code. Is there any chance that you could post the code files in a format that I can use directly in the Arduino IDE? I'm comfortable with the Arduino IDE platform and I know how to use it with ESP-32 boards. PlatformIO....not so much.

    Beauty! It worked! I'm able to compile and load into an ESP-32 DEV board that I happen to have on hand. Date and time is showing up in the serial monitor. Now I just have to wait for the PCB and parts to show up in the mail. Thanks again!

    So here's another stupid question. How do I configure the time zone for my region? I checked out the pool NTP service but it doesn't make any sense to me. I'm on the West Coast of The United States. My time zone would be Los Angeles. What should I change TZ_INFO to? Maybe I should be using a different server in the United State as well?

    Hey I figured something out for myself for a change. Appropriate TZ text is found here: https://documentation.media5corp.com/display/DGWPR... and I just deleted the de. from the server so that it would zero in on something closer to me: pool.ntp.org. Cheers!

    View Instructable »
  • Just double checking. A 14500 lithium ion battery is 3.7 volts. That will work o.k. with your circuit?

    Great! However I'm having a hard time finding a battery that specifically states that there is a built in protection circuit. Do you have any specific recommendations?

    Well I love this project! I'm so happy that you put in the time and effort to share it. I'm going to give it a try. I've ordered the parts and the PCB from OSH Park. I hope it all works out. If you do make it into a wearable watch I hope that you follow up with an Instructables showing how you made the leather strap. I'd be willing to give that a try as well. Good Job!

    View Instructable »
  • Thanks for updating the Gerber files. I notice that there are now two zip files in the master folder: "VFD_Watch-V1.1-RS-274x" and "VFD_Watch_V1.1." What are the differences? Which one should I submit to the PCB fabricator? And when I order I should specifically comment "Please include slot plating?" Sorry for the bonehead questions but I really haven't used these services much and I don't want to drop the money until I know that I've got things right. In fact I think I'll go with OSH Park which quotes $28.90 for just three boards but they are really beautiful. Cheers!

    View Instructable »
  • I also bought a bunch of these VFD displays off of eBay a while back when I saw the ChronodeVFD project on Hackerspace hoping that one day he'd share the PCB file. That guy never responded to questions and seems to have dropped off of the face of the Earth. So I'm really very ecstatically thrilled that you worked out a similar project. Thank you sooooooo much for that! I'm sourcing the parts and I think that everything is going to be good through Mouser. I'll use your Gerber files to order some PCB's through JLCPCB. I've been wanting to try their service out for a while now so this is my chance. I'm wondering about the strap slots. Some of your photos show them uncut and one photo shows them cut out. Does the PCB that comes from JLCPCB have them professionally cut out? It would look kind…

    see more »

    I also bought a bunch of these VFD displays off of eBay a while back when I saw the ChronodeVFD project on Hackerspace hoping that one day he'd share the PCB file. That guy never responded to questions and seems to have dropped off of the face of the Earth. So I'm really very ecstatically thrilled that you worked out a similar project. Thank you sooooooo much for that! I'm sourcing the parts and I think that everything is going to be good through Mouser. I'll use your Gerber files to order some PCB's through JLCPCB. I've been wanting to try their service out for a while now so this is my chance. I'm wondering about the strap slots. Some of your photos show them uncut and one photo shows them cut out. Does the PCB that comes from JLCPCB have them professionally cut out? It would look kind of nasty if I had to drill them out with my Dremel tool. Also, what option did you select so that the PCB has a gold finish? I'd like to do that too.

    View Instructable »
  • Have made it into a wearable wristwatch like Johngineer did?

    View Instructable »
  • O.K. maybe I'm missing something obvious here, but where's the code? I've looked top to bottom several time and there doesn't seem to be any link to the final code. Maybe I'm going nuts. I dunno....

    View Instructable »
  • Thank you! That works. I'm now getting UTC time and date! Wooohoo!

    View Instructable »
  • The pull up resistor make no difference for me. I suspect it's not an issue.

    So, I've gotten past almost all the hurdles but the final goal still eludes me. Has anyone gotten the GPS circuit to work properly? I've been successful using the PIKkit3 to program my chips after figuring out how to correctly set the power target voltage. I've gotten the LCD to display both lines after learning from HunnyDob that D3 has to be pulled up to 5V rather than being grounded. Why is that? Why do all the instructions show that this pin is grounded when it just doesn't work that way? This makes me wonder if there isn't something else going on related to the hardware that came with the kit. Now I'm stuck on the GPS project. I leaned that X8C global options have to be set to C Standard C90 (whatever that means) before it will compile so that's all good now. I've successfully loaded…

    see more »

    So, I've gotten past almost all the hurdles but the final goal still eludes me. Has anyone gotten the GPS circuit to work properly? I've been successful using the PIKkit3 to program my chips after figuring out how to correctly set the power target voltage. I've gotten the LCD to display both lines after learning from HunnyDob that D3 has to be pulled up to 5V rather than being grounded. Why is that? Why do all the instructions show that this pin is grounded when it just doesn't work that way? This makes me wonder if there isn't something else going on related to the hardware that came with the kit. Now I'm stuck on the GPS project. I leaned that X8C global options have to be set to C Standard C90 (whatever that means) before it will compile so that's all good now. I've successfully loaded the code into the chip and it displays both lines of the opening LCD screen. But that's it. It never progresses further. The GPS module is powered and the green light flashes telling me that GPS data is being received. The TX output line from the GPS module is connected properly to the RX input port on the PIC. But nothing is happening. No further information comes up on the LCD. It's just stuck on the first intro screen. What gives? Any ideas?

    The status light routinely turns off for me as well. That seems to be normal. My PICkit3 is working fine. Something else must be wrong.

    View Instructable »
  • It's probably not the PIC chip. If the circuit is behaving erratically then make sure you have capacitors placed across VCC and VDD (+ and -) of the power supply. Transients in the supply rail often cause trouble. The capacitors help to smooth them out. Also, the cheep Chinesium breadboard may be at fault. If the capacitors don't help then try rewiring the circuit using different holes.

    View Instructable »
  • Thanks! That works!

    See answer from HunnyDob. That solved the problem of not getting both lines to show up.

    View Instructable »
  • I totally agree! The comments in the Instructables sections are often very helpful. The next best source is the Reddit HackerBoxes site and the least useful is the Discord site which is mostly just chatter among a few people who don't have much of anything useful to say. Also, if all else fails be sure to contact HackerBoxes support directly. They really are very helpful.

    View Instructable »
  • In your photo I can't see clearly where you have the LED (+) anode pin placed. Is it on PIC pin 2? That would be the correct output pin so make sure that the anode (+) side of the LED (longer pin) is connected to PIC pin 2 and the cathode (-) side (shorter pin) is connected to ground. Otherwise...no blinky.

    Don't forget to check off the "Power target circuit from PICkit 3" box when you set the voltage. That was tripping me up until I finally checked it off. After that I was good to go.

    View Instructable »
  • See FAQ.

    Similar issue with my project. I had to swap out a bad '386 with a good one that I fortunately had on hand. Everything seems to be working well now.

    View Instructable »
  • Thank you!!! My kit just arrived today from Banggood. I googled it hoping that something more detailed would show up and Shazaaam here I am! Your detailed work is much appreciated!

    View Instructable »