author
97CommentsLeesville, SCJoined July 17th, 2009
Retired from USAF after 24 years in 2007. Involved with old cars since 1979, Ramblers and AMCs are my specialty. Build and modify my own computers since the mid 80s -- started with Tandy Color Computer 2. Part time instructor at Aiken Technical College (welding, other construction related courses).
  • farna commented on mosivers's instructable Remodeled 80s Boombox20 days ago
    Remodeled 80s Boombox

    You should be able to remove the tape deck or radio and input the headphone jack from the MP3 player in its place. Exactly how I can't say, would have to have a schematic. The headphone output signal might not match either, but it wouldn't hurt to try.

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  • farna commented on gravitino's instructable A Tiny Telescope Observatory7 weeks ago
    A Tiny Telescope Observatory

    You could have made the peaked ends in two parts. Just made the walls all the same size then made the peaks lift off. You'd have to open the roof then lift the peaks off. Use 1" or so pipe through the walls and sticking up enough to set the peaks on. A double 2x4 block where the pipes come up and through for added support. When the roof is closed the peaks will stay in place. You'd want some kind of external latch for the roof panels though. Door in the end wall would be short. It ould be made to open with the peak in place so you could crawl in, but an external latch on the roof would be better.

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  • farna commented on doily_grunge's instructable Brake Drum Potbelly Heater2 months ago
    Brake Drum Potbelly Heater

    There are some automotive finishes for exhaust manifolds that would work well and not burn off. Not "high temp" spray paint -- though that might work well on this heater, it does burn off the hottest parts of exhaust manifolds or headers. https://www.eastwood.com/paints/hi-temp-engine-paints/exhaust-paints.html

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  • farna commented on TheBeardlessMan's instructable Cereal Cannon3 months ago
    Cereal Cannon

    A ompression type spring would have been muh easier, though it may not provide as much "power" to shoot with. With a ompression spring everything an be loaded from the muzzle (spring and bolt). A semi-auto pistol recoil spring would do nicely, but you can get various hardware store springs that would work.

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  • farna commented on JulioC150's instructable How to CORRECTLY Solder a Copper Pipe3 months ago
    How to CORRECTLY Solder a Copper Pipe

    If you read the link it says the only manufacturer in North America closed. True MAPP is still available in Europe from Rothenberger... might be imported in Canada. Uses a different type connector, more like a butane stove type connection.

    The joints will be fine. Type M has a psi rating of 430 for annealed 1/2" tubing (350 for 3/4", 295 for 1"). Drawn tubing has even higher ratings. For joints you need to use 95-5 tin-antimony. Ratings for 1/4"-1" is 500 psi @ 100 degrees F -- down to 200 psi @ 250 degrees. 50-50 tin-lead 200 psi @ 100 degrees F, down to 85 psi @ 250 degrees.http://www.alascop.com/pdf/cu/water_tubing_1.pdf

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  • farna commented on JulioC150's instructable How to CORRECTLY Solder a Copper Pipe3 months ago
    How to CORRECTLY Solder a Copper Pipe

    MAPP gas is no longer available. The only maker stopped making it in 2008. https://www.hunker.com/13415241/mapp-gas-vs-propane-gasThe current MAPP/Pro gets hotter than propane, but not as hot as the old MAPP gas.

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  • The Surly Mermaid: Catamaran to Recreational Cruiser Conversion

    Great job! If there isn't a prohibition to gas power on your small lake, a little 2.5-5 hp outboard would be a much better propulsion unit. I don't think I'd put anything over a 5 hp on it though. Of course you just may not want anything fossil fueld, which is fine! An electric outboard might be the ticket, but electric outboards are expensive... unless you order directly from China.... https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Brand-New-HANGKAI-...Note that the cheap Chinese motor DOES NOT come with the 48V, 1000W/24AH battery (batteries?) needed. Four 12V in series would work though. Otherwise they are around $2000 for a 3 hp, but those typically include a battery. https://www.torqeedo.com/us/en-us/products/outboards/travel/travel-1003/M-1142-20.html

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  • farna commented on valentinepeter's instructable Portable Demand Use Hot Water Shower3 months ago
    Portable Demand Use Hot Water Shower

    The solar water heatwer showers only work well when exposed to a good warm sun for a few hours... so no good for coole mornings or winter weather. The Ivation sounds like a good idea as long as you have a source to heat up your water. There are several similar models on Amazon in the $30-40 range. This model is better for larger parties though. Still need a pop-up shower tent. Could supply all your hot water needs, not just a shower, and temp is adjustable. I'd use one of those heaters if I were building my own camper. A small pop-up tent camper would be nice to tow. I've always wanted to remodel a small 12-15' camper and have little more than a bed and bathroom... a motel room on wheels. Cook and such outside, still have the convenience of your own bathroom and a comfortable bed with ...

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    The solar water heatwer showers only work well when exposed to a good warm sun for a few hours... so no good for coole mornings or winter weather. The Ivation sounds like a good idea as long as you have a source to heat up your water. There are several similar models on Amazon in the $30-40 range. This model is better for larger parties though. Still need a pop-up shower tent. Could supply all your hot water needs, not just a shower, and temp is adjustable. I'd use one of those heaters if I were building my own camper. A small pop-up tent camper would be nice to tow. I've always wanted to remodel a small 12-15' camper and have little more than a bed and bathroom... a motel room on wheels. Cook and such outside, still have the convenience of your own bathroom and a comfortable bed with AC and heat! Maybe have the bed fold up into a couch, or use a sleeper sofa in front instead of a bed... but I'm getting off subject!

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  • farna commented on cwmaurer's instructable How to Recharge Your Car's Air Conditioner4 months ago
    How to Recharge Your Car's Air Conditioner

    This is really "topping off" an AC system, not "recharging". The term "recharging" makes me think of "recharging" the system after a major component replacement or repair, where it had to be totally "discharged". Modern AC systems have both an under pressure and an overpressure safety switch, either will cause the compressor to turn off. Sometimes they are combined into a single physical switch. You CAN "recharge" an empty system without vacuuming, but it won't work as efficiently as it should -- won't get as cold -- as it will have some air and moisture in it. The only way to remedy that situation is to empty and vacuum the system. Mositure "boils out" in a vacuum, so you get rid of both air and moisture when vacuumi...

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    This is really "topping off" an AC system, not "recharging". The term "recharging" makes me think of "recharging" the system after a major component replacement or repair, where it had to be totally "discharged". Modern AC systems have both an under pressure and an overpressure safety switch, either will cause the compressor to turn off. Sometimes they are combined into a single physical switch. You CAN "recharge" an empty system without vacuuming, but it won't work as efficiently as it should -- won't get as cold -- as it will have some air and moisture in it. The only way to remedy that situation is to empty and vacuum the system. Mositure "boils out" in a vacuum, so you get rid of both air and moisture when vacuumin. Vacuum pumps aren't cheap. Unless you plan on doing several it's not worth it to get a vacuum pump, take it to a pro.

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  • farna commented on deba168's instructable DIY OFF GRID SOLAR SYSTEM4 months ago
    DIY OFF GRID SOLAR SYSTEM

    Are you in the US? You can install solar panels and feed them into the grid if so. By law the power companies have to buy any electricity you produce. In some states it's much easier to implement than others though, check with local solar companies. You always use off the grid, but whatever you produce is fed into the grid during daytime. That offsets your electric bill. In most states the electric company just gives you a credit for whatever you produce, not a check in the mail. There are automatic switches for generators that switch from grid to generator during a power outage. Shouldn't be hard to create something similar that will auto switch over when battery level is down. Those auto power outage switches aren't cheap though. Controlling the switch could be done with an Arduino or...

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    Are you in the US? You can install solar panels and feed them into the grid if so. By law the power companies have to buy any electricity you produce. In some states it's much easier to implement than others though, check with local solar companies. You always use off the grid, but whatever you produce is fed into the grid during daytime. That offsets your electric bill. In most states the electric company just gives you a credit for whatever you produce, not a check in the mail. There are automatic switches for generators that switch from grid to generator during a power outage. Shouldn't be hard to create something similar that will auto switch over when battery level is down. Those auto power outage switches aren't cheap though. Controlling the switch could be done with an Arduino or similar controleer, but you'd still need the heavy duty switch to switch over the load.

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  • farna commented on Bob-Bee's instructable Foam Glider Plane From Cup Noodles4 months ago
    Foam Glider Plane From Cup Noodles

    I used to make gliders from the foam trays meat comes packed on. Would have my mom save and wash them, then I'd draw WWII airplanes on them. Used paper clips and stick pins to weight the nose, but gluing a penny or washer to the front like you did would work well... but detract more from looks.

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  • farna commented on zmatt's instructable Air Conditoned Tent for Those Hot Months4 months ago
    Air Conditoned Tent for Those Hot Months

    Remember, there is a "be nice" policy for posts. If you don't like the idea simply don't post. The comments about no insulation so the AC runs a lot are valid. A tarp over the tent will help, and if you can set it so there is a space between the tent and tarp it will be better. In the USAF we air condition tensts in the desert. The tents have a stand-off top (we called it a "fly") that is supported 12" away from the tent top. That will drop the inside temp about 10 degrees in the daytime. The tents also have a liner which is a white cotton-like (some blend) material that ties up inside the rigd tent frame with about a 6" air space between the tent walls and inside. That acts like a layer of insulation. These were 16' x 32' TEMPER tents. They also had a fabr...

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    Remember, there is a "be nice" policy for posts. If you don't like the idea simply don't post. The comments about no insulation so the AC runs a lot are valid. A tarp over the tent will help, and if you can set it so there is a space between the tent and tarp it will be better. In the USAF we air condition tensts in the desert. The tents have a stand-off top (we called it a "fly") that is supported 12" away from the tent top. That will drop the inside temp about 10 degrees in the daytime. The tents also have a liner which is a white cotton-like (some blend) material that ties up inside the rigd tent frame with about a 6" air space between the tent walls and inside. That acts like a layer of insulation. These were 16' x 32' TEMPER tents. They also had a fabric duct that ran down the center to more evenly distribute cool (and warm) air over the length. I can see using the AC as you have it at night only, turned down just enough to be cool enough to sleep. Trying to use it in a hot climate in the day time for very long wouldn't be a good idea unless you were set up for it. A pop-up over the tent, shading it, would help, or a really shady camp site. The ul;timate would be a tent within a tent -- the inner just a bit smaller than the outer. That would improve the temp inside even without the AC -- either a pop-up/shade or the inner tent (or both) would help. Since you have a tent (preferably tents) set up this way you may as well get a small heat/cool unit so it can be used year round, though a small ceramic heater or electric blanket would be more efficient for the winter.

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  • farna commented on DavidBrister's instructable Single Seat Skin on Frame Kayak / Canoe4 months ago
    Single Seat Skin on Frame Kayak / Canoe

    Great job and design! Sounds like a good job for that "Flex Seal" advertised on TV so much. The commercial where they spray a screened area in the bottom of a boat and go out in the water with it. You can get it in spray cans or in a can where you can use a roller or brush to apply. Fiberglass resin would probably be more permanent, but make sure it doesn't melt the nylon material before attempting to seal the whole boat. You could use fiberglass cloth over the frame them coat with resin inside and out -- that would make a strong and light canoe. I think I'd use at least two layers of cloth though.

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  • farna commented on monickingbird's instructable Honda Civic Micro Camper/utility Trailer10 months ago
    Honda Civic Micro Camper/utility Trailer

    Tongue weight has been discussed enough, but... If it has 200# of tongue weight now, you won't be able to load much in the front. Load as many heavy camping items behind the rear wheels to reduce tongue weight. A trailer MUST have a good bit of weight on the tongue or it will sway badly at anything over 40-45 mph. I've seen similar conversions of four door station wagons, vans, and just the trunk portion of a car. I did one of the later myself, but I moved the axle forward a bit so it was just about centered (also kept the back seat area to balance it out). A station wagon cut between front and rear doors is about right as far as balance, but then you have a large flat front. Cut the REAR DOOR area out and weld back together... shorten a van in the same manner... and it would be bette...

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    Tongue weight has been discussed enough, but... If it has 200# of tongue weight now, you won't be able to load much in the front. Load as many heavy camping items behind the rear wheels to reduce tongue weight. A trailer MUST have a good bit of weight on the tongue or it will sway badly at anything over 40-45 mph. I've seen similar conversions of four door station wagons, vans, and just the trunk portion of a car. I did one of the later myself, but I moved the axle forward a bit so it was just about centered (also kept the back seat area to balance it out). A station wagon cut between front and rear doors is about right as far as balance, but then you have a large flat front. Cut the REAR DOOR area out and weld back together... shorten a van in the same manner... and it would be better balanced. Lots of work there though, and you have to be a competent welder...

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  • farna commented on bennelson's instructable DIY Solar Garage10 months ago
    DIY Solar Garage

    Great job! Since you covered one whole side of your garage it would have been feasible to use the panels AS the roofing, but that would have taken a lot more planning and time to build the frame. You'd have still needed metal for the rear roof. Probably wouldn't have saved you any, or at least not much, due to the extra cost/time of building the frame and sealing the panels to be leak-proof. Would be a good bit more to make it an off-grid system -- have to store power for night use somehow. Right now lead-acid deep cycle batteries are probably the most cost effective, but would take a good many. I thought about an off-grid system just for the lighting in my shop. Wouldn't take much, 2 large capacity deep cycle batteries would have supplied 5-6 hours of light -- IIRC it would have been 4...

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    Great job! Since you covered one whole side of your garage it would have been feasible to use the panels AS the roofing, but that would have taken a lot more planning and time to build the frame. You'd have still needed metal for the rear roof. Probably wouldn't have saved you any, or at least not much, due to the extra cost/time of building the frame and sealing the panels to be leak-proof. Would be a good bit more to make it an off-grid system -- have to store power for night use somehow. Right now lead-acid deep cycle batteries are probably the most cost effective, but would take a good many. I thought about an off-grid system just for the lighting in my shop. Wouldn't take much, 2 large capacity deep cycle batteries would have supplied 5-6 hours of light -- IIRC it would have been 4+ hours with every light on the whole time (all fluorescent types... would be better with today's LEDs!). After I totaled the cost it just wasn't cost effective. If I spent a couple hours in the shop EVERY night it might have been, but reality is that I only spent an average of 3-4 hours in the shop at night a week. Would have taken 20 years to use enough electricity to pay for the initial cost of the system, and I'd have to replace the batteries every 5-6 years.

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  • Building a Custom Automotive Wheel From Scratch

    "Homemade wheels are not safe" isn't necessarily true -- it depends on the builder. They aren't DOT approved, but that doesn't mean they aren't safe. This is a judgement call every hot rodder has to make. There are always things that a rodder makes on their car that could be an issue if they failed. That's just part of the rodding culture. There is some risk involved, which is why I do some things on my car I wouldn't do for someone else.

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  • farna commented on gravityisweak's instructable How to Build a Block Retaining Wall11 months ago
    How to Build a Block Retaining Wall

    Very well done! When I first saw the photos I was thinking to make a comment about leaning the wall back by staggering the blocks, but discovered you did that (with the lip) ! Great observation about why you didn't use mortar and shouldn't unless it's a large wall with a deep poured concrete foundation. You could leave the lip on the first course though. The gravel (or sand) in the bottom should easily conform around it.

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  • farna commented on bekathwia's instructable Solar Balloon1 year ago
    Solar Balloon

    So use a hair dryer on "hot" to fill the balloon and it should be ready to rise! Might cool down quick though... depends on how hot the day is..

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  • farna commented on Tiobel's instructable GPS Speedometer1 year ago
    GPS Speedometer

    Sammbo, I'd like to see how you made the speedo with the stepper motor. This GPS model is great too... easy to use in a different vehicle. Most likely just have a bad speed sensor in the car causing the original speedo not to work at times, or just a bad connection at the sensor...

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  • farna commented on emilyvanleemput's instructable TARDIS Siege Mode Cube1 year ago
    TARDIS Siege Mode Cube

    Hmm... print Rubick's Cube size stickers for each side and stick them on a cube... Would be interesting!!

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  • farna commented on bennelson's instructable Build Your Own Electric Car!1 year ago
    Build Your Own Electric Car!

    Hmm... interesting, but more complicated. Generator just requires an electric cord connection. A mechanical engine as you describe would basically be one speed. You would still need a clutch connection (maybe electric, like a riding lawn mower blade clutch) and some kind of throttle. Otherwise the electric motor would be "helping" the engine at times. Maybe a one-way clutch so the engine never put a drag on the electric motor? Still think that would be a lot more complicated and harder to implement than a generator. Easiest thing to do is just rent a car for longer trips. Would be cheaper in the long run! I had a friend who didn't own a car, just his bicycle and public transportation. Rented a car 4-5 times a year for longer trips, even a weekend for Christmas shopping. No car...

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    Hmm... interesting, but more complicated. Generator just requires an electric cord connection. A mechanical engine as you describe would basically be one speed. You would still need a clutch connection (maybe electric, like a riding lawn mower blade clutch) and some kind of throttle. Otherwise the electric motor would be "helping" the engine at times. Maybe a one-way clutch so the engine never put a drag on the electric motor? Still think that would be a lot more complicated and harder to implement than a generator. Easiest thing to do is just rent a car for longer trips. Would be cheaper in the long run! I had a friend who didn't own a car, just his bicycle and public transportation. Rented a car 4-5 times a year for longer trips, even a weekend for Christmas shopping. No car insurance or maintenance, nor of course payments, just $1000 or so a year in rental fees. Would work with an electric car for commuting if it has the range.

    A lot of those plans were from Robert G Riley Enterprises.https://www.rqriley.com/plans.htmlPlans are still available. He allowed the magazine to print an article and rudimentary set of plans (that needed scaling up and such, but a really good fabricator/builder could do it from the article), then sold full size, more detailed plans if you wanted them. Good way to get cheap marketing!

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  • farna commented on bennelson's instructable Build Your Own Electric Car!1 year ago
    Build Your Own Electric Car!

    That's a lot more than I thought it would be! Anything over a 5K generator would be rather large, 2500-3000W would be a better physical size. So you could add some miles, but not quite enough to cruise on... unless you built something like a trailer with a large generator on it. Would be good for long range running, and would be a bit more efficient than a typical gasoline car, but you may as well just rent a small car when you need to make a long trip, assuming your normal commute is short enough for an electric car (or hybrid with a small generator). Might double range with a small generator, but more than likely not add more than 20-30% -- depends on a lot of variables. May as well add 2-3 more batteries for the space and weight of the generator...

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  • farna commented on lukeg22woo's instructable Design and Build a Tiny House1 year ago
    Design and Build a Tiny House

    This is more home built camper than most tiny houses to me, but it suits your purpose and you did a fantastic job of planning and documenting! That you were planning an Instructable as you built is a big bonus -- otherwise would you have documented as carefully as you did? That documentation will come in handy a year or two down the road if/when you run into a problem or decide to make alterations. You would have done well to investigate campers more. A camper water heater is small, six gallons is typical. Older ones are gas only, newer gas and electric. When I use gas I just turn it on 5-10 minutes before I want hot water, then turn it off when done. They are very well insulated and compact, and will hold hot water for hours once heated. Obviously they heat up pretty fast on gas. My n...

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    This is more home built camper than most tiny houses to me, but it suits your purpose and you did a fantastic job of planning and documenting! That you were planning an Instructable as you built is a big bonus -- otherwise would you have documented as carefully as you did? That documentation will come in handy a year or two down the road if/when you run into a problem or decide to make alterations. You would have done well to investigate campers more. A camper water heater is small, six gallons is typical. Older ones are gas only, newer gas and electric. When I use gas I just turn it on 5-10 minutes before I want hot water, then turn it off when done. They are very well insulated and compact, and will hold hot water for hours once heated. Obviously they heat up pretty fast on gas. My newest camper has a gas/electric heater -- on electric I just leave it on. Doesn't take much to keep water hot once heated, and obviously the electric element doesn't heat it up as quick as gas. But your tankless water heater is a great idea, and takes no more room than the camper tank heater. Probably other camper tricks you could have used. Buying an old camper and stripping it for parts and such is a good idea. I don't think I'd try to use the shell for a semi-permanent abode, but strip it down to the frame and just use that and many of the aplicances, tanks, and other fixtures. Room for improvement, but you know that. Fantastic job for a first build!

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  • farna commented on bennelson's instructable Build Your Own Electric Car!1 year ago
    Build Your Own Electric Car!

    Cheapest way to add range is to install a small generator -- even a little 700W (running, 900W peak), $99 Harbor Freight unit would add a LOT of cruising miles. It would sip gas, so you'd get 70+ mpg, and could even use fewer batteries for less weight. The 20 mile range car would get triple the range, as the batteries would mostly be used for taking off, cruising would run mainly on the generator. Would take some work on the control side though. Should be able to rig the generator basically as a battery charger and run it all the time, that would be the simplest way. It would only run at higher speeds when there was a lot of current draw. Just make sure the generator exhaust is run out of the car... sort of goes without saying! Makes it a hybrid instead of true electric, but would be m...

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    Cheapest way to add range is to install a small generator -- even a little 700W (running, 900W peak), $99 Harbor Freight unit would add a LOT of cruising miles. It would sip gas, so you'd get 70+ mpg, and could even use fewer batteries for less weight. The 20 mile range car would get triple the range, as the batteries would mostly be used for taking off, cruising would run mainly on the generator. Would take some work on the control side though. Should be able to rig the generator basically as a battery charger and run it all the time, that would be the simplest way. It would only run at higher speeds when there was a lot of current draw. Just make sure the generator exhaust is run out of the car... sort of goes without saying! Makes it a hybrid instead of true electric, but would be more practical. The generator could provide all cruising electricity. Ideally you'd want a little more generator than required for cruising so the batteries would get a little extra charge for when you get back in town.

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  • farna commented on scoochmaroo's instructable Krispy Kreme Donut (Doughnut) Recipe1 year ago
    Krispy Kreme Donut (Doughnut) Recipe

    Just cut into squares or rectangles and fry, call them Beignets!

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  • farna commented on woodbywright's instructable Free Lumber the Hard Way1 year ago
    Free Lumber the Hard Way

    The way it was done in the "good old days"... think pioneering days..

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  • Digital Wall Calendar and Home Information Center

    DAKboard: https://dakboard.com/siteBasically the same as this 'ible, but it apparently runs from a web service you sign up for. I'd prefer something stand-alone so I don't have to share info with anyone I don't want to. But DAKboard does have a ready to go unit at a reasonable price ($299 +$20 shipping to US, but currently on backorder, so price may go up a bit). Or there are instructions to make your own, then you can sign up for the service... apparently at no charge? Couldn't find anything about cost without actually signing up. But you can use it on a regular computer as well.

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  • farna commented on seamster's instructable Portable Bandsaw Metal Stand1 year ago
    Portable Bandsaw Metal Stand

    I bet an old sewing machine foot switch would work, for those who want to re-purpose/recycle something...

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  • farna commented on buck2217's instructable La-z-boy Reclaimed1 year ago
  • Building A Computer Desk / DIY Desk PC

    If you don't need much computing power it would be real easy to build everything into one drawer. Just mount a ITX or other small motherboard in there with a power supply. You just need to make sure you have enough cable slack to open the drawer. Many other small computers come to mind, the quad core Raspberry Pi for example...

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  • Bluetooth Door Lock (Arduino)

    There are problems with this, one being if power fails you can't get in. Batteries die also. There are several makes of push-button combination door locks that run on batteries. A really cool idea would be to attach the Arduino controller to one of those. Even if you had to by-pass the keyboard (use bluetooth smart phone to get in) it would be a neat project. Should be able to simply bypass the keyboard lock and activate the bolt remotely though, at least on the dead-bolt versions. These locks have a keyed entry option also, so you're never locked out (or in without taking the lock apart). Of course Schlage and Kwikset both make bluetooth accessible "connected" lock sets in the US, starting at $200...https://www.build.com/schlage-be469nx-cam/s828834...

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  • farna commented on makjosher's instructable The Anywhere Outlet1 year ago
    The Anywhere Outlet

    Well this is a good looking outlet and I can see where it would be a better choice than a traditional power strip. I must be a stick-in-the-mud, however, and point out that a power strip with a small dual USB wall wart (or two if you need them) will be a lot less cost and serve the same purpose, and most have a built-in circuit breaker. A long narrow strip might not work well for some locations though. I've used a similar setup on construction sites -- a dual outlet metal box on the end of a 10 gauge extension cord so more than one power tool can be plugged in. As noted, you need to size the cord according to the expected load. Even with four outlets, we usually only ran one or two tools at a time, just didn't have to reach down and change cords when more than one tool was required for ...

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    Well this is a good looking outlet and I can see where it would be a better choice than a traditional power strip. I must be a stick-in-the-mud, however, and point out that a power strip with a small dual USB wall wart (or two if you need them) will be a lot less cost and serve the same purpose, and most have a built-in circuit breaker. A long narrow strip might not work well for some locations though. I've used a similar setup on construction sites -- a dual outlet metal box on the end of a 10 gauge extension cord so more than one power tool can be plugged in. As noted, you need to size the cord according to the expected load. Even with four outlets, we usually only ran one or two tools at a time, just didn't have to reach down and change cords when more than one tool was required for a job. Running four 8-12A power tools at once would have been a problem! 10 gauge is only rated for 15A. Most replacement cords are 16 or 14 gauges, rated at ~4A and ~6A, respectively, when used for power transmission (22A and 32A for short runs, the shorter the cord the more it can safely carry). See http://www.powerstream.com/Wire_Size.htm

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  • farna commented on jenspen's instructable Retro Radio Upgrade2 years ago
  • farna commented on amackay's instructable Junkyard Radio to Table Radio2 years ago
    Junkyard Radio to Table Radio

    Try a wal-wart from telephone equipment -- answering machine or wireless telephone. They should be a bit better shielded and have enough power.

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  • How to Spray Paint your jeep and make an assault vehicle

    No negotiating over price. I removed all the trim, bumpers, and lights. One car I drove to the shop so left the tail lights in, took a screwdriver and removed them when I got there. I also wet sanded the car and filled a few minor dings. Even if you let them fill the larger dings still wet sand the car yourself. You need to research paint prepping a car, you can find several articles on the 'net better than I can explain. If you want a color they don't have you will need to purchase your own paint. Talk to the shop owner about what brand and type paint they prefer before buying. You may need more than just paint -- they should be able to tell you what you need to bring if you use something other than what they normally use -- or they may refuse to spray a different type/brand. As I said...

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    No negotiating over price. I removed all the trim, bumpers, and lights. One car I drove to the shop so left the tail lights in, took a screwdriver and removed them when I got there. I also wet sanded the car and filled a few minor dings. Even if you let them fill the larger dings still wet sand the car yourself. You need to research paint prepping a car, you can find several articles on the 'net better than I can explain. If you want a color they don't have you will need to purchase your own paint. Talk to the shop owner about what brand and type paint they prefer before buying. You may need more than just paint -- they should be able to tell you what you need to bring if you use something other than what they normally use -- or they may refuse to spray a different type/brand. As I said, no negotiating on price. You buy the paint job they sell. If you do more prep work you get a better, longer lasting job and they tend to take more care also. If you bring your own paint they won't reduce price normally. When using house paint their cost is minimal since they buy in bulk. They can usually mix just about any color, the house paint is a good quality paint in most cases.

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  • farna commented on ambercollective's instructable How to Buy an Ex-Ambulance2 years ago
    How to Buy an Ex-Ambulance

    Your biggest mileage breaker in an ex military vehicle is the rear ale ratio. The smallish engine (2.24L? small I-6?) for the vehicle size means it needs a lot of gear, especially when carrying a load. The military Jeep Gladiator based M-715 had a 3.77L I-6 and used a 5.87:1 axle with a four speed manual transmission. You need a bit higher (smaller number = higher gear) rear axle for one thing, but remember that it will reduce towing/load capacity. Unless you plan on hauling a load cross country that shouldn't be much of an issue. I would think you can go up at least one whole number (using the Jeep example, from a 5.87 to a 4.87). That should gain you 2-3 mpg and increase highway speed. The Jeep would attain 55 mph, but I wouldn't want to push it at that speed for a long run.

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  • farna commented on MathieuP2's instructable Armchair upcycled from pallets2 years ago
    Armchair upcycled from pallets

    Great design, but the pallets I find around here (central South Carolina. US) are usually made of rather rough wood. Unless you have way too much time on your hands sanding isn't a good option -- better to buy wood or salvage from another source. I realize, however, that part of the "fun" is recycling the pallet. A belt sander will work best. Sand the upper surface before taking the pallet apart so everything stays in place, then as the poster suggests, CUT the end boards off close instead of trying to pull the nails/pry boards apart to reduce splitting. If the wood is really dry and brittle (cracks easily), DRILL holes for screws or nails just a little smaller than the screw or nail. You may need to countersink screw heads. Don't need a fancy countersink bit, just drill the ...

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    Great design, but the pallets I find around here (central South Carolina. US) are usually made of rather rough wood. Unless you have way too much time on your hands sanding isn't a good option -- better to buy wood or salvage from another source. I realize, however, that part of the "fun" is recycling the pallet. A belt sander will work best. Sand the upper surface before taking the pallet apart so everything stays in place, then as the poster suggests, CUT the end boards off close instead of trying to pull the nails/pry boards apart to reduce splitting. If the wood is really dry and brittle (cracks easily), DRILL holes for screws or nails just a little smaller than the screw or nail. You may need to countersink screw heads. Don't need a fancy countersink bit, just drill the small hole first then use a bit the size of the screw head and drill a shallow hole. The smaller hole will guide the larger bit to center.

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