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20Instructables1,017,930Views107CommentsJoined March 20th, 2009
I'm just a compulsive DIYer that plays guitar and tries to fix just about everything around the house and garage. Sometimes I even succeed!

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  • How to Repair a Broken Guitar Neck (headstock)

    I agree with JordanD101. Take all the strings off the tuners so they strings are out of your way while you are working on it. Take off the two tuners at the break - and the other two tuners as well if the break extends up into their area. Glue/clamp the break as explained in the article. From here you can take two paths to keep the tuner holes clear:1. after glue/clamping, use a wet Q-Tip or something to clean out the hole for the tuners. That should probably take care of any issues with clogging up the tuner hole. or 2. After the glue has dried, you could use an appropriate size drill bit to clean out the hole - but that's dangerous because the drill might end up migrating to one side of the hole or the other an make the hole bigger. But on the flip side, you could manually use a...

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    I agree with JordanD101. Take all the strings off the tuners so they strings are out of your way while you are working on it. Take off the two tuners at the break - and the other two tuners as well if the break extends up into their area. Glue/clamp the break as explained in the article. From here you can take two paths to keep the tuner holes clear:1. after glue/clamping, use a wet Q-Tip or something to clean out the hole for the tuners. That should probably take care of any issues with clogging up the tuner hole. or 2. After the glue has dried, you could use an appropriate size drill bit to clean out the hole - but that's dangerous because the drill might end up migrating to one side of the hole or the other an make the hole bigger. But on the flip side, you could manually use a drill bit to finish up after you use the Q-Tip on the wet glue just to make things a little more tidy.I did a video on a repair to a Ukelele bridge a while back that you might find helpful as well: Let us know how it turns out!

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  • How to Repair a Broken Guitar Neck (headstock)

    I know people will swear by one glue and swear AT another. But no one ever offers any evidence. Here are two published papers and a wood worker's review that seem to reach the conclusion that most wood glues are pretty good for gluing wood- https://unb.ca/fredericton/forestry/wstc/_resource...https://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/pdf2016/fpl_201...https://woodgears.ca/joint_strength/glue.htmlObviously some glues can fail if exposed to excessive heat or moisture (ex. Hide glue)... But for hide glue, that's one of it's potential benefits.... or weakness. So the bottom line is: Elmers will hold up just fine - please provide published proof if that's not the case.

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  • How to Repair a Broken Guitar Neck (headstock)

    If you post a pic, I'd have a better idea of what to suggest. But the short answer is - if it's a similar break as the example in this Instructable, then you can simply follow the same directions. If it's not clear, please let me know and we can work together on getting the answer. Thanks!

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  • How to Repair a Broken Guitar Neck (headstock)

    A few comments on this 1- On the guitar in this Instructable, the wood glue demonstrated its strength as seen when the guitar was knocked over a 2nd time and the neck broke in a different place - the original repair held up just fine. The break had nothing to do with the original fix. So I totally disagree that the wood glue doesn't hold up - the proof was demonstrated here.2. If you want to use hot hide glue, that's great. But for most people, the accessibility and ease of using wood glue out weighs any benefits of using the hot hide glue. If you have an expensive guitar, then yes, use hot hide glue - and if you don't have experience with hot hide glue, then by all means take it to a luthier and let them use what they feel is best. But keep in mind that hide glues are not permanen...

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    A few comments on this 1- On the guitar in this Instructable, the wood glue demonstrated its strength as seen when the guitar was knocked over a 2nd time and the neck broke in a different place - the original repair held up just fine. The break had nothing to do with the original fix. So I totally disagree that the wood glue doesn't hold up - the proof was demonstrated here.2. If you want to use hot hide glue, that's great. But for most people, the accessibility and ease of using wood glue out weighs any benefits of using the hot hide glue. If you have an expensive guitar, then yes, use hot hide glue - and if you don't have experience with hot hide glue, then by all means take it to a luthier and let them use what they feel is best. But keep in mind that hide glues are not permanent - they can fail from heat (example here: http://www.stewmac.com/How-To/Online_Resources/Neck_Building_and_Repair_and_Setup/The_damage_caused_by_storing_a_guitar_in_a_hot_car_or_attic.html)3. Epoxy is lower on the list as well - yes it's strong. But it doesn't penetrate the wood fibers as well and clean up on a finished guitar neck can be a nightmare. If you're working with an original build and are at the glue/clamp/sanding stage (pre-finish), then it's probably ok.

    Tell you what - Why don't you create and post your own Instructable and show us all how it's done.

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  • fishpotpete's instructable Building a Sound Proof Basement Studio Room's weekly stats: 1 year ago
    • Building a Sound Proof Basement Studio Room
      686 views
      24 favorites
      0 comments
  • How to Repair a Broken Guitar Neck (headstock)

    Very cool! I'd probably give that a week before I would tune it up and start playing again. Excellent job!

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  • How to Repair a Broken Guitar Neck (headstock)

    I suggest leaving the fretboard attached and trying to "inject" glue into the split. There are several other's that have done this with success.Basically, just follow my directions. If the split can be opened enough, you could spread the glue in the split with something like a cheap, small artist brush. Good luck with that! And be sure to post some pics after you're done!

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  • How to Repair a Broken Guitar Neck (headstock)

    I'm not familiar with shoe glue. But shoes are not wood, so I'm not sure how that's going to work long term. Might last forever - if it does then you're OK :-)If you could post some decent/in-focus pics, then that would help. Here's some questions in the meantime:1. What kind of guitar is it? Electric, acoustic, 6 vs 12 string?2. What kind of break was it? with the grain, across the grain, a complete break (the head totally came off the neck), etc...3. Where did the break occur on the neck? Near the headstock, in the headstock, in the middle of the neck, etc...3. Were you able to tune the guitar properly before the break occurred? 4. What is the specific brand name/model of the glue you used?If you can get back to me on these questions and try to post some pics, then I can probabl...

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    I'm not familiar with shoe glue. But shoes are not wood, so I'm not sure how that's going to work long term. Might last forever - if it does then you're OK :-)If you could post some decent/in-focus pics, then that would help. Here's some questions in the meantime:1. What kind of guitar is it? Electric, acoustic, 6 vs 12 string?2. What kind of break was it? with the grain, across the grain, a complete break (the head totally came off the neck), etc...3. Where did the break occur on the neck? Near the headstock, in the headstock, in the middle of the neck, etc...3. Were you able to tune the guitar properly before the break occurred? 4. What is the specific brand name/model of the glue you used?If you can get back to me on these questions and try to post some pics, then I can probably give you some kind of an answer.Good luck! And thanks for asking!

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  • Convert a Laptop With a Broken Screen Into a Quiet, Space Saving Desktop

    That's a good point... **IF** the battery is still good. By the time I get a hand-me-down laptop, the batteries are generally shot. But I hadn't even thought about that until you brought it up. You're right, a built in UPS could be a huge bonus in a studio setting! Thanks for bringing that up!

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  • How to repair a broken guitar neck (headstock)

    You don't HAVE to take the strings off. But they need to be totally loose and out of the way. I'd recommend taking them off and putting a new set on afterwards. What do you mean when you say the neck is not all the way off? If you could post a few photos, that would helpful in figuring out the best way to fix it. Thanks!

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  • How to repair a broken guitar neck (headstock)

    I assume you're talking about the bottom of the line, old school white glue like you used for grade school art projects. It is advertised as being strong as the wood... but I would probably recommend getting small bottle of a glue formulated specifically for wood (I use the Elmer's products... and there are many others out there). A small bottle will cost under $5 (US) and is a good investment for this kind of fix.Having said that, if it's a clean, even with the grain, large surface area break (like the example in my article) and the pieces match up together and it's not on a highly stressed neck (like a 12 string acoustic) and all I had was the bottom of the line white glue, then I MIGHT give it a shot. If it was a nasty break perpendicular to the neck/across the grain or across a...

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    I assume you're talking about the bottom of the line, old school white glue like you used for grade school art projects. It is advertised as being strong as the wood... but I would probably recommend getting small bottle of a glue formulated specifically for wood (I use the Elmer's products... and there are many others out there). A small bottle will cost under $5 (US) and is a good investment for this kind of fix.Having said that, if it's a clean, even with the grain, large surface area break (like the example in my article) and the pieces match up together and it's not on a highly stressed neck (like a 12 string acoustic) and all I had was the bottom of the line white glue, then I MIGHT give it a shot. If it was a nasty break perpendicular to the neck/across the grain or across a small area of stressed wood (like the tuning key slots on a classical guitar), then I probably wouldn't want to risk it. As far as being messy, you only need to cover the surface of the wood and you don't need very much to get good coverage - remember you're squeezing/clamping the parts together after that. So all the extra glue that oozes out was too much glue. There should be SOME oozing and the thing to look for is consistent oozing along the entire seam so you know there's even coverage across the gluing surface. If you go back to the article, you'll see I use a small brush to smooth out the glue and get it deep into the grooves of the wood.I try to get the major blobs off after I hand-tighten then joint - you can use paper towels or even a small piece of paper (the heavier stock the better) to scrape off the big stuff. The after I get the clamps in place, I'll do the final "wet" clean up with moist paper towels. The more wet cleanup you do, the less you'll have to deal with dried glue later on.I'm still going to recommend you get an actual "wood" glue for your guitar. The cheapest of the cheap might work just fine and I've used it on many wood projects in my youth and it held up fine when/if I applied the glue properly. I just wouldn't want to see someone go through the trouble of the fix and the glue not hold up... You would probably find out before you even got all the strings up to pitch.Good luck and let us know what you end up doing!

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    • Rehab and Upgrades for a Fender Squire Strat - Plus Two Knob Mod
      893 views
      25 favorites
      2 comments
    • Wireless Raspberry Pi Digital Picture Frame in a Shadow Box
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      50 favorites
      3 comments
  • How to Fix, Repair or Make a 1/4" Inch Guitar Cable

    That's good to know. The comments on the pictures are a critical part of these Instructables. I wonder if the moderators know the comments aren't showing up???

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  • fishpotpete followed fishpotpete1 year ago
      • Rehab and Upgrades for a Fender Squire Strat - Plus Two Knob Mod
      • Wireless Raspberry Pi Digital Picture Frame in a Shadow Box
      • Replacement Charcoal Tray or Pan for a Charcoal Grill
  • Wireless Raspberry Pi Digital Picture Frame in a Shadow Box

    I briefly mentioned it. But one issue I had with the videos is although it was cool, they were sideways. I'm sure there's some obscure Linux command that can take of this... Any ideas anyone?

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