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fishpotpete

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I'm just a compulsive DIYer that plays guitar and tries to fix just about everything around the house and garage. Sometimes I even succeed!

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  • Building a Sound Proof Basement Studio Room

    The elastomeric stuff really is a total mess before you drywall everything in. But it sticks, doesn't come off and never dries. The technology has been around since the 1950's. So the these formulations are pretty much optimized now - the green glue is just a well thought out marketing plan. "Hey, let's add green dye to our stuff!".Good luck on your project. Let us know how it turns out. It's a massive job, but I've never looked back!

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  • How to Repair a Broken Guitar Neck (headstock)

    I hear what you're saying about people not understanding about these repairs. I can see that the value of the guitar would go down, but it's still just as playable and durable.

    No. I would suggest you not do that. The glue is more than sufficient to hold the repair. If the repair is done properly, the glue will not fail. It was even demonstrated in this article because the headstock had broken off and was repaired before. That 1st repair glue joint held up perfectly even when exposed to the same forces that caused the neck to break in a different place the 2nd time. And if the guitar gets knocked over again and the headstock breaks off, I feel confident that the break would occur at a different spot than the first two places (although probably pretty close to the same area).

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  • Fender Squier Bass VI – Fixing Tone, Tuning and Intonation

    Yes you can. But the trem on these don't alter the pitch late much - not like a strat or something. You really have to put some muscle into it to get it vary the pitch significantly. You probably get a little more play without the sleeves, but you also get a lot more tuning issues/etc.

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  • MXR Classic Overdrive - Flip a Switch to Make It a Zakk Wylde ZW44!

    Looks awesome! I like the green paint job on that one. I ended up selling mine eventually, but wish I had kept it :-(

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  • Raspberry Pi Home Network Music System

    I'm working on a Pi 3 B+ with Musicbox installed. I can't get it to connect to my Synology NAS. that has a similar set up with openElect on another PI for a digital picture frame and it has no problem getting the pictures off the NAS. Do I need to set up Samba (or whatever) like I did with the openElect to get Musicbox to connect to the NAS? I really hate that Musicbox doesn't have some kind GUI to work from (aside from the browser window) - dealing with lines of code truly sucks. Actually, your video is what inspired me to try this in the first place! :-)

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  • How to Repair a Broken Guitar Neck (headstock)

    Sounds like a challenge! Can you post any pictures? That would help me (or others) make some suggestions. The bottom line is that just about ANY broken neck can be fixed and the guitar will be just as playable as before (if done correctly). Gibson necks break off all the time and it's a routine fix.

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  • Building a Sound Proof Basement Studio Room

    So far this room has worked well for everything. My weak point is the lack of a 2nd sealed door and you can hear drums/guitars/etc. through the studio door in my office... it's definitely attenuated sound, but it's definitely audible. But upstairs is still quiet to my ears. If you built a similar room as mine and had the sealed double door system, I really think a drum would be SIGNIFICANTLY under control. The key to the doors is that they are solid/exterior doors (that don't have windows) and an air tight seal around the top, bottom and sides.I just haven't got around to adding the 2nd door because I haven't got any complaints from the wife :-)

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  • Convert a Laptop With a Broken Screen Into a Quiet, Space Saving Desktop

    Excellent question - some of this will take some experimentation. To start, I would just hook up an external monitor and see if it comes on when you boot up the laptop. If not, try to figure out which function button changes the screen selection. Other options include, turning on the laptop and THEN plugging in the external monitor (and play with the function key if needed, etc.). Sometimes you might need to try a different monitor as well. One thing to keep in mind is that if it's old laptop without a screen, it may have other problems as well (like not being able to hook up to an external monitor). Good luck and let us know if you get it going!

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  • How to Repair a Broken Guitar Neck (headstock)

    Sorry to take so long to get back to you!I tend to agree with the guitar shop and just open the thing up and fix it. That's a pretty simple break, unless I'm missing something. As I show in the article, you want enough glue to cover the surface and not much more. There should be some oozing when you clamp it -and the oozing should be pretty much consistent along the entire repair. From the photos it looks like the tuner don't come into play on this repair at all. So I'd just leave them in place.Glue - Since this is probably the most critical, major structural component of the guitar, I strongly recommend using a quality wood glue (like Elmers/etc.) and not use the hide glue There are a lot of conversations about various kind of glues in the previous comments/responses - take a look…

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    Sorry to take so long to get back to you!I tend to agree with the guitar shop and just open the thing up and fix it. That's a pretty simple break, unless I'm missing something. As I show in the article, you want enough glue to cover the surface and not much more. There should be some oozing when you clamp it -and the oozing should be pretty much consistent along the entire repair. From the photos it looks like the tuner don't come into play on this repair at all. So I'd just leave them in place.Glue - Since this is probably the most critical, major structural component of the guitar, I strongly recommend using a quality wood glue (like Elmers/etc.) and not use the hide glue There are a lot of conversations about various kind of glues in the previous comments/responses - take a look through those.The key to any repair like this is to position the two pieces so they "lock" together... even just dry, the two should fit hand-in-glove kind of thing. With no side to side movement. If you can't get it to do that while it's dry, then the break may be too complex to try to explain in an email. That's when you go to the shop, especially if this is a nice Les Paul (not like the cheap Epi LP in the article.) Please let me know if you have any other questions!

    Yes, the neck will be just as strong as it was before. Actually stronger because you fixed the weakest part! That's not to say it could break again in a different place. That's what happened to the guitar in my article. It got knocked over a second time and it broke again... but not in the spot where the original repair was. That part held up fine.

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  • Good to hear you got it to work! I love my Bass VI - my only issue now is that I still can't get the low E to intonate as much as I would like (like maybe get to the 7th fret before tuning starts to go). The rest of it is spot on. I'm not sure why we have to go through all of this in the first place on these!

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  • Sorry to hear about your guitar! You're on the right track... so go ahead and take out any hardware that might be in the way before you glue. As far as bolt holes and things, you can clean them during the gluing process while the glue is still wet. You could potentially wait until the glue is dry and drill them out - but you have a very strong possibility of the glue pushing the drill bit in the wrong direction and messing up the hole. As far as the wood glue is concerned, it won't stick to the metal parts very good at all. So I wouldn't worry about the metal bits getting glued in place. But there's no reason to have to fool with that later on.If you use a cloth strap clamp, be careful that it doesn't get glued to the neck! You don't need a death grip on the joint. Just enough to…

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    Sorry to hear about your guitar! You're on the right track... so go ahead and take out any hardware that might be in the way before you glue. As far as bolt holes and things, you can clean them during the gluing process while the glue is still wet. You could potentially wait until the glue is dry and drill them out - but you have a very strong possibility of the glue pushing the drill bit in the wrong direction and messing up the hole. As far as the wood glue is concerned, it won't stick to the metal parts very good at all. So I wouldn't worry about the metal bits getting glued in place. But there's no reason to have to fool with that later on.If you use a cloth strap clamp, be careful that it doesn't get glued to the neck! You don't need a death grip on the joint. Just enough to ensure even contact and pressure across the joint and sufficient pressure to squeeze out any excess glue. Tight, but not enough to leave dents :-)

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  • I agree with JordanD101. Take all the strings off the tuners so they strings are out of your way while you are working on it. Take off the two tuners at the break - and the other two tuners as well if the break extends up into their area. Glue/clamp the break as explained in the article. From here you can take two paths to keep the tuner holes clear:1. after glue/clamping, use a wet Q-Tip or something to clean out the hole for the tuners. That should probably take care of any issues with clogging up the tuner hole. or 2. After the glue has dried, you could use an appropriate size drill bit to clean out the hole - but that's dangerous because the drill might end up migrating to one side of the hole or the other an make the hole bigger. But on the flip side, you could manually use a d…

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    I agree with JordanD101. Take all the strings off the tuners so they strings are out of your way while you are working on it. Take off the two tuners at the break - and the other two tuners as well if the break extends up into their area. Glue/clamp the break as explained in the article. From here you can take two paths to keep the tuner holes clear:1. after glue/clamping, use a wet Q-Tip or something to clean out the hole for the tuners. That should probably take care of any issues with clogging up the tuner hole. or 2. After the glue has dried, you could use an appropriate size drill bit to clean out the hole - but that's dangerous because the drill might end up migrating to one side of the hole or the other an make the hole bigger. But on the flip side, you could manually use a drill bit to finish up after you use the Q-Tip on the wet glue just to make things a little more tidy.I did a video on a repair to a Ukelele bridge a while back that you might find helpful as well: Let us know how it turns out!

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  • I know people will swear by one glue and swear AT another. But no one ever offers any evidence. Here are two published papers and a wood worker's review that seem to reach the conclusion that most wood glues are pretty good for gluing wood- https://unb.ca/fredericton/forestry/wstc/_resource...https://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/pdf2016/fpl_201...https://woodgears.ca/joint_strength/glue.htmlObviously some glues can fail if exposed to excessive heat or moisture (ex. Hide glue)... But for hide glue, that's one of it's potential benefits.... or weakness. So the bottom line is: Elmers will hold up just fine - please provide published proof if that's not the case.

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  • If you post a pic, I'd have a better idea of what to suggest. But the short answer is - if it's a similar break as the example in this Instructable, then you can simply follow the same directions. If it's not clear, please let me know and we can work together on getting the answer. Thanks!

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  • Tell you what - Why don't you create and post your own Instructable and show us all how it's done.

    A few comments on this 1- On the guitar in this Instructable, the wood glue demonstrated its strength as seen when the guitar was knocked over a 2nd time and the neck broke in a different place - the original repair held up just fine. The break had nothing to do with the original fix. So I totally disagree that the wood glue doesn't hold up - the proof was demonstrated here.2. If you want to use hot hide glue, that's great. But for most people, the accessibility and ease of using wood glue out weighs any benefits of using the hot hide glue. If you have an expensive guitar, then yes, use hot hide glue - and if you don't have experience with hot hide glue, then by all means take it to a luthier and let them use what they feel is best. But keep in mind that hide glues are not permanent …

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    A few comments on this 1- On the guitar in this Instructable, the wood glue demonstrated its strength as seen when the guitar was knocked over a 2nd time and the neck broke in a different place - the original repair held up just fine. The break had nothing to do with the original fix. So I totally disagree that the wood glue doesn't hold up - the proof was demonstrated here.2. If you want to use hot hide glue, that's great. But for most people, the accessibility and ease of using wood glue out weighs any benefits of using the hot hide glue. If you have an expensive guitar, then yes, use hot hide glue - and if you don't have experience with hot hide glue, then by all means take it to a luthier and let them use what they feel is best. But keep in mind that hide glues are not permanent - they can fail from heat (example here: http://www.stewmac.com/How-To/Online_Resources/Neck_Building_and_Repair_and_Setup/The_damage_caused_by_storing_a_guitar_in_a_hot_car_or_attic.html)3. Epoxy is lower on the list as well - yes it's strong. But it doesn't penetrate the wood fibers as well and clean up on a finished guitar neck can be a nightmare. If you're working with an original build and are at the glue/clamp/sanding stage (pre-finish), then it's probably ok.

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    • Building a Sound Proof Basement Studio Room
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  • Very cool! I'd probably give that a week before I would tune it up and start playing again. Excellent job!

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  • I suggest leaving the fretboard attached and trying to "inject" glue into the split. There are several other's that have done this with success.Basically, just follow my directions. If the split can be opened enough, you could spread the glue in the split with something like a cheap, small artist brush. Good luck with that! And be sure to post some pics after you're done!

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  • I'm not familiar with shoe glue. But shoes are not wood, so I'm not sure how that's going to work long term. Might last forever - if it does then you're OK :-)If you could post some decent/in-focus pics, then that would help. Here's some questions in the meantime:1. What kind of guitar is it? Electric, acoustic, 6 vs 12 string?2. What kind of break was it? with the grain, across the grain, a complete break (the head totally came off the neck), etc...3. Where did the break occur on the neck? Near the headstock, in the headstock, in the middle of the neck, etc...3. Were you able to tune the guitar properly before the break occurred? 4. What is the specific brand name/model of the glue you used?If you can get back to me on these questions and try to post some pics, then I can probably …

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    I'm not familiar with shoe glue. But shoes are not wood, so I'm not sure how that's going to work long term. Might last forever - if it does then you're OK :-)If you could post some decent/in-focus pics, then that would help. Here's some questions in the meantime:1. What kind of guitar is it? Electric, acoustic, 6 vs 12 string?2. What kind of break was it? with the grain, across the grain, a complete break (the head totally came off the neck), etc...3. Where did the break occur on the neck? Near the headstock, in the headstock, in the middle of the neck, etc...3. Were you able to tune the guitar properly before the break occurred? 4. What is the specific brand name/model of the glue you used?If you can get back to me on these questions and try to post some pics, then I can probably give you some kind of an answer.Good luck! And thanks for asking!

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  • That's a good point... **IF** the battery is still good. By the time I get a hand-me-down laptop, the batteries are generally shot. But I hadn't even thought about that until you brought it up. You're right, a built in UPS could be a huge bonus in a studio setting! Thanks for bringing that up!

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  • You don't HAVE to take the strings off. But they need to be totally loose and out of the way. I'd recommend taking them off and putting a new set on afterwards. What do you mean when you say the neck is not all the way off? If you could post a few photos, that would helpful in figuring out the best way to fix it. Thanks!

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  • I assume you're talking about the bottom of the line, old school white glue like you used for grade school art projects. It is advertised as being strong as the wood... but I would probably recommend getting small bottle of a glue formulated specifically for wood (I use the Elmer's products... and there are many others out there). A small bottle will cost under $5 (US) and is a good investment for this kind of fix.Having said that, if it's a clean, even with the grain, large surface area break (like the example in my article) and the pieces match up together and it's not on a highly stressed neck (like a 12 string acoustic) and all I had was the bottom of the line white glue, then I MIGHT give it a shot. If it was a nasty break perpendicular to the neck/across the grain or across a s…

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    I assume you're talking about the bottom of the line, old school white glue like you used for grade school art projects. It is advertised as being strong as the wood... but I would probably recommend getting small bottle of a glue formulated specifically for wood (I use the Elmer's products... and there are many others out there). A small bottle will cost under $5 (US) and is a good investment for this kind of fix.Having said that, if it's a clean, even with the grain, large surface area break (like the example in my article) and the pieces match up together and it's not on a highly stressed neck (like a 12 string acoustic) and all I had was the bottom of the line white glue, then I MIGHT give it a shot. If it was a nasty break perpendicular to the neck/across the grain or across a small area of stressed wood (like the tuning key slots on a classical guitar), then I probably wouldn't want to risk it. As far as being messy, you only need to cover the surface of the wood and you don't need very much to get good coverage - remember you're squeezing/clamping the parts together after that. So all the extra glue that oozes out was too much glue. There should be SOME oozing and the thing to look for is consistent oozing along the entire seam so you know there's even coverage across the gluing surface. If you go back to the article, you'll see I use a small brush to smooth out the glue and get it deep into the grooves of the wood.I try to get the major blobs off after I hand-tighten then joint - you can use paper towels or even a small piece of paper (the heavier stock the better) to scrape off the big stuff. The after I get the clamps in place, I'll do the final "wet" clean up with moist paper towels. The more wet cleanup you do, the less you'll have to deal with dried glue later on.I'm still going to recommend you get an actual "wood" glue for your guitar. The cheapest of the cheap might work just fine and I've used it on many wood projects in my youth and it held up fine when/if I applied the glue properly. I just wouldn't want to see someone go through the trouble of the fix and the glue not hold up... You would probably find out before you even got all the strings up to pitch.Good luck and let us know what you end up doing!

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    • Rehab and Upgrades for a Fender Squire Strat - Plus Two Knob Mod
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    • Wireless Raspberry Pi Digital Picture Frame in a Shadow Box
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  • That's good to know. The comments on the pictures are a critical part of these Instructables. I wonder if the moderators know the comments aren't showing up???

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      • Rehab and Upgrades for a Fender Squire Strat - Plus Two Knob Mod
      • Wireless Raspberry Pi Digital Picture Frame in a Shadow Box
      • Replacement Charcoal Tray or Pan for a Charcoal Grill
  • I briefly mentioned it. But one issue I had with the videos is although it was cool, they were sideways. I'm sure there's some obscure Linux command that can take of this... Any ideas anyone?

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