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  • garrydelf commented on GFire's instructable Tool Restoration2 months ago
    Tool Restoration

    Do not use baking soda for electrolysis rust removal. Use Washing soda it is a different composition. There are Instructables that will take you through the correct procedure.

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  • Make Joints in Woodworks DISSAPEAR!! - DIY Wood Filler

    I need to comment on the last line of the above information about a better look. The filler mentioned is not what is commonly referred to as wood filler, they are referring to a product of the same name, wood filler, that comes in various sized containers and usually is only available at professional paint stores. In most cases it is supplied in the US in pint, quart and gallon containers and is used mostly by the hardwood floor refinishing trade. It is a heavy bodied product, usually oil based, that must be thoroughly stirred before use. It's usually applied by rag, brush or trowel, allowed to sit for a short time and worked in and removed with burlap or other coarse fabric material. If the wood is to be or has been stained it's best to add some of the same color to the product to help...

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    I need to comment on the last line of the above information about a better look. The filler mentioned is not what is commonly referred to as wood filler, they are referring to a product of the same name, wood filler, that comes in various sized containers and usually is only available at professional paint stores. In most cases it is supplied in the US in pint, quart and gallon containers and is used mostly by the hardwood floor refinishing trade. It is a heavy bodied product, usually oil based, that must be thoroughly stirred before use. It's usually applied by rag, brush or trowel, allowed to sit for a short time and worked in and removed with burlap or other coarse fabric material. If the wood is to be or has been stained it's best to add some of the same color to the product to help it blend in and eliminate hazing or clouding of the color. It's mostly used on porous hardwoods such as oak to fill in the large pores, reduce the amount of top coat needed and tame the wild grain. Hey, sgbotsford, that might make a good Instructable!

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  • garrydelf commented on JT Woodworks's instructable How to Clean a Table Saw Blade8 months ago
    How to Clean a Table Saw Blade

    The best thing to use on any of your tools is a couple of coats of paste wax. Brand doesn't matter Johnsons, TreWax, Bruce, Minwax, whatever. Work it in and let it sit and harden up for ten minutes or so and lightly buff it by hand. Paste Wax seals the steel preventing rust and dust and dirt are less likely to stick. Coating your cast iron, steel or composite table saw top makes work pieces and the miter gauge glide across the top. Paste wax is not recommended for aluminum.

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  • garrydelf commented on tomatoskins's instructable Lathe Drum Sander10 months ago
    Lathe Drum Sander

    Someone did a built up drum, I'm trying to remember who, Stumpy Nubs maybe? As I recall he cut a stack of MDF cookies with a 4-1/8" hole saw glued them all together with a threaded rod and then pulled the rod and put it in the lathe between centers and trued it up down to about 4" diameter. Actually, if you're worried about flex but not about weight you could fill the tube with Quickcrete but it isn't really necessary. Others have made these and as was said earlier just do light passes and at the low cost of PVC pipe you can make several and outfit them with with different grits and quickly change them out. Having been in the machine trade the suggestion to use the table with paper attached is really a good one because then the two parts are trued to each other. It also would ...

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    Someone did a built up drum, I'm trying to remember who, Stumpy Nubs maybe? As I recall he cut a stack of MDF cookies with a 4-1/8" hole saw glued them all together with a threaded rod and then pulled the rod and put it in the lathe between centers and trued it up down to about 4" diameter. Actually, if you're worried about flex but not about weight you could fill the tube with Quickcrete but it isn't really necessary. Others have made these and as was said earlier just do light passes and at the low cost of PVC pipe you can make several and outfit them with with different grits and quickly change them out. Having been in the machine trade the suggestion to use the table with paper attached is really a good one because then the two parts are trued to each other. It also would be best if the adjustment could be made with a single control or the two could be locked together with either a chain drive or segmented belt drive. Single would be better always adhering to the KISS principle. I'm definitely downloading this and building it. Oh, as regarding kickback, not really an issue. You're going to bog down the machine before you get that far. The workpiece would have to have quite a taper to it before it would be able to get that much of a grip. Besides, with too heavy of a feed you're going to burn and ruin your workpiece and load up your belt in a very short time. It's sanding not sawmilling!

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  • garrydelf commented on tomatoskins's instructable 20 Unusual Uses for Shop Tools10 months ago
    20 Unusual Uses for Shop Tools

    You are correct, the terminology used is incorrect. A CLEARANCE hole is just that, to allow clearance for the threads of a bolt to pass through. The correct term is PILOT HOLE which is approximately the diameter of the body of the insert. That diameter will be listed on the package so DO read the package directions. Not covered in this instructable, the correct installation method. Whether you use this method or not, if the insert has grooves on one end, those are not screwdriver slots, they are to assist with thread cutting and are to go in the hole first. The insert shown has a flange at the top so will go in only one way but many do not. I've read several 'ibles and seen other plans and instructions that tell you to use a screwdriver. Don't do it, period. Use the bolt and nut method ...

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    You are correct, the terminology used is incorrect. A CLEARANCE hole is just that, to allow clearance for the threads of a bolt to pass through. The correct term is PILOT HOLE which is approximately the diameter of the body of the insert. That diameter will be listed on the package so DO read the package directions. Not covered in this instructable, the correct installation method. Whether you use this method or not, if the insert has grooves on one end, those are not screwdriver slots, they are to assist with thread cutting and are to go in the hole first. The insert shown has a flange at the top so will go in only one way but many do not. I've read several 'ibles and seen other plans and instructions that tell you to use a screwdriver. Don't do it, period. Use the bolt and nut method as described here and you'll save yourself a lot of grief especially in hardwood.

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  • Face Clamp Attachment (Get the Most Out of Your Clamps)

    Very good idea and a new take on work holding. I have to say that you are one of the first guys I've seen to install thread inserts almost correctly. Everyone wants to use the slots on the one end as a screwdriver slot. They are to assist with thread cutting and so should be entered into the hole first. Otherwise you are correct, lock them in place with another insert or a nut tightened up to the face and drive them in with a wrench until they are flush with the surface loosen the nut and back out the screw and you're done. Another trick is to put a flat washer between the nut and the insert. When the washer is flat on the wood surface the insert is fully seated. The glue is not a bad idea either. I cannot believe the number of people I see who should know better using screwdrivers on t...

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    Very good idea and a new take on work holding. I have to say that you are one of the first guys I've seen to install thread inserts almost correctly. Everyone wants to use the slots on the one end as a screwdriver slot. They are to assist with thread cutting and so should be entered into the hole first. Otherwise you are correct, lock them in place with another insert or a nut tightened up to the face and drive them in with a wrench until they are flush with the surface loosen the nut and back out the screw and you're done. Another trick is to put a flat washer between the nut and the insert. When the washer is flat on the wood surface the insert is fully seated. The glue is not a bad idea either. I cannot believe the number of people I see who should know better using screwdrivers on those slots. The inserts are not hardened and those slots will get ruined before the insert is seated when installing in hardwood. Keep up the good work I like your Instructables because almost all I've seen are done with basic tools and techniques.

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  • garrydelf commented on mikeasaurus's instructable Glow Table1 year ago
    Glow Table

    since no one has jumped in on this here's my two cents. Stain the wood before you add the resin in moderate coats, don't let too much go down in the cavities. If using oil based products allow plenty of time for the stain in particular to dry completely, I'm talking days at a time as oil based stains are very slow to properly dry and cure. Then add the resin followed by the poly top coats. Since I've become lazy and impatient I don't use oil based products unless I have to. My stain of choice is aniline dyed shellac followed by several coats of white shellac, light sanding with 340 or 440 grit to remove any nibs and two to four light coats of paste wax hand buffed in between. The heck with all that sanding, waste of time. A buttery smooth satin finish without all the work, you're done i...

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    since no one has jumped in on this here's my two cents. Stain the wood before you add the resin in moderate coats, don't let too much go down in the cavities. If using oil based products allow plenty of time for the stain in particular to dry completely, I'm talking days at a time as oil based stains are very slow to properly dry and cure. Then add the resin followed by the poly top coats. Since I've become lazy and impatient I don't use oil based products unless I have to. My stain of choice is aniline dyed shellac followed by several coats of white shellac, light sanding with 340 or 440 grit to remove any nibs and two to four light coats of paste wax hand buffed in between. The heck with all that sanding, waste of time. A buttery smooth satin finish without all the work, you're done in a day and next to no cure time as opposed to up to three weeks for lacquer.

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  • garrydelf commented on jonassink's instructable Pipe Clamp Bench Vise1 year ago
    Pipe Clamp Bench Vise

    Be very careful using drywall screws in Kreg pocket holes. The tapered heads act like a wedge and can split your wood. Use either the Kreg screws or cabinet screws or other flat bottomed head screw from the box store which are usually cheaper. The pocket hole jig has become one of those under bench dwellers that I wish I hadn't spent my money on. I haven't had the success with them that other people have had. In most cases dowels or screw blocks are a stronger choice. Nice job on the vise. Good recovery on the mis-drilled hole, happens all the time. It's woodworking, don't point out the flaws, show the good points! :-}

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  • garrydelf commented on ana_labrincha's instructable Plywood Dollhouse1 year ago
    Plywood Dollhouse

    Thank You, Thank You, Thank You!!

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  • garrydelf commented on ana_labrincha's instructable Plywood Dollhouse1 year ago
    Plywood Dollhouse

    I was so hoping to make this but no matter what I try with my features lacking Epson printer I cannot print the templates to actual size. Without measurements to go by I guess I will have to pass.

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  • Installing Threaded Inserts in to Plywood

    There are a couple of pieces of information missing in this article. You do not go into the correct method for installing this type of insert. Your photo seems to show the insert being installed with a driver made for the purpose but many of the people reading this will not have one and won't care to buy one. There are several instruction videos on You Tube that shows the installation of this type insert incorrectly. The slots on the insert are NOT for installing the insert with a screwdriver. This is a common mistake. They are to assist with cutting the threads into the wood and are inserted into the hole first. The correct method to install these inserts is to use a bolt and a nut of the same size as the internal thread of the insert. Thread the nut onto the bolt, run the bolt into th...

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    There are a couple of pieces of information missing in this article. You do not go into the correct method for installing this type of insert. Your photo seems to show the insert being installed with a driver made for the purpose but many of the people reading this will not have one and won't care to buy one. There are several instruction videos on You Tube that shows the installation of this type insert incorrectly. The slots on the insert are NOT for installing the insert with a screwdriver. This is a common mistake. They are to assist with cutting the threads into the wood and are inserted into the hole first. The correct method to install these inserts is to use a bolt and a nut of the same size as the internal thread of the insert. Thread the nut onto the bolt, run the bolt into the insert to the end of the threads in the insert, snug the nut up against the head of the insert and use a wrench on the nut to drive the insert in flush with the surface of the wood, hold the head of the bolt and loosen the nut then back out the bolt and you're done. Running the bolt to the end of the threads prevents stretching and deforming the threads in the insert. Sorry to be so long winded but I wanted to save people the frustration of trying to install an insert only to get it about half way in and have the slot strip out and wonder what to do next. Been there, done that, don't want to do it again!

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