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7CommentsJoined October 13th, 2015
Mechanical Engineer that is into electronics, programming, chemistry and basically all things science. DIY everything :)
  • Homemade Tin Can Turbine With 3d-printed Compressor

    Wow, nice engineering work, great instructable :)Just one little tip: The real (full size) turbines use full ceramic bearings, they don't require lubrication and can operate at high temperatures.

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  • A Laser Beam Combiner With 3d Printed Parametric Optomechanical Components.

    I had no issues with lag, but the instructable has several 3D-CAD files displayed directly on the page at a fairly high polygon count. You might want to check your settings to see if hardware acceleration is turned on (put chrome://gpu in your adress bar to view the settings). Hope this helps :)

    Awesome instructable, great use of a 3D-printer ;) The speckling is probably caused by the poor quality of the lenses (or filters) inside the laser pointers. Also it looks like your Dichroic Prism has seen better days, maybe adding a collimator at the end of your setup would improve things?I would like to see more of your project's results, but unfortunately I can't seem to access the video's. When I click the link (or select "save link as...") I get a file not found error.

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  • gendragonfly commented on Junophor's instructable UV-Fluorescence Steampunk Lamp8 months ago
    UV-Fluorescence Steampunk Lamp

    Just a safety tip for anyone who wants to build this project:UV wavelengths below 315 nm are harmful to the skin (not just the eyes) ! And the shorter they get the more damaging they are.If at all possible try using an LED for this build without the small peak at 245 nm, this is UV-C radiation and can be very harmful. Curing LED's (like the one used in this project seems to be) often have several peaks because its helpful in speeding up the curing process, it is however not good for your skin. (That's why they are only allowed to be used in closed environments where the harmful light can't escape.) Even at the low energy levels of one or two LED's long term exposure will still do damage. A black light LED (400 nm) or an LED that produces only one wavelength between 385-415 nm would be f...

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    Just a safety tip for anyone who wants to build this project:UV wavelengths below 315 nm are harmful to the skin (not just the eyes) ! And the shorter they get the more damaging they are.If at all possible try using an LED for this build without the small peak at 245 nm, this is UV-C radiation and can be very harmful. Curing LED's (like the one used in this project seems to be) often have several peaks because its helpful in speeding up the curing process, it is however not good for your skin. (That's why they are only allowed to be used in closed environments where the harmful light can't escape.) Even at the low energy levels of one or two LED's long term exposure will still do damage. A black light LED (400 nm) or an LED that produces only one wavelength between 385-415 nm would be fine for this project and way safer. Anything below 380 nm isn't visible anyway, so unless your trying to get a tan, try to stay away from the shorter wavelengths. I hope, even though we all like shiny things with a nice patina, we also like to keep our DNA in one piece ;)Please add a warning about this to your instructable Junophor. Very nice instructable otherwise, the end result looks amazing :)

    You're welcome, happy to contribute to such a nice instructable :)

    3 watts in LED power is equivalent of 30 watts for a regular incandescent bulb, same for 10 watts, that's equivalent to 100 watts incandescent. Generally bulbs that people use on the ceiling of their house, have a higher wattage like 80 to 150 watts (otherwise the house would be quite dark at night). So anything below 60 watts is usable for small lights or mood lighting. Which wattage you choose should be determined by the amount of light in the room you want to put the light in. If you want your LED to be visible under an 80 watt or higher lamp, I'd recommend picking a higher wattage LED, something around 40-50 watt equivalent. This would mean a 4 or 5 watt LED. If you want to have mood lighting in a dark room less than 3 watts might be sufficient and if you want your LED to be visible...

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    3 watts in LED power is equivalent of 30 watts for a regular incandescent bulb, same for 10 watts, that's equivalent to 100 watts incandescent. Generally bulbs that people use on the ceiling of their house, have a higher wattage like 80 to 150 watts (otherwise the house would be quite dark at night). So anything below 60 watts is usable for small lights or mood lighting. Which wattage you choose should be determined by the amount of light in the room you want to put the light in. If you want your LED to be visible under an 80 watt or higher lamp, I'd recommend picking a higher wattage LED, something around 40-50 watt equivalent. This would mean a 4 or 5 watt LED. If you want to have mood lighting in a dark room less than 3 watts might be sufficient and if you want your LED to be visible in daylight more than 8 watts will probably be necessary. As for the wavelength, 400nm is really the sweet spot.The link you sent are cree-LEDs meaning they run on high amperage and they run hot! You'll need a heat sink or you might want to use lower amperage LEDs like these: https://m.aliexpress.com/item/32858162555.html?trace=wwwdetail2mobilesitedetail&productId=32858162555&productSubject=10PCS-3W-LED-Black-Light-Bulbs-Lamp-UV-Light-Chips-UV395-400Nm-LED-Ultraviolet-Lights-for&spm=2114.search0104.3.1.105a6bc7CwUKfS&ws_ab_test=searchweb0_0,searchweb201602_5_10065_10068_5729915_319_317_10696_10924_10084_453_454_10083_10618_10920_10921_10304_10307_10922_10820_10301_10821_5730815_537_536_10843_10059_10884_10887_100031_321_322_10103,searchweb201603_51,ppcSwitch_0&algo_expid=414e922c-35aa-4a98-a7d0-af1cc209d434-0&algo_pvid=414e922c-35aa-4a98-a7d0-af1cc209d434Hope it helps :)If you have anymore questions feel free to send me a message

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  • gendragonfly followed ynze8 months ago
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