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  • goroberts56. commented on MadeByBarb's instructable Geode Painted UpCycled Chairs2 months ago
    Geode Painted UpCycled Chairs

    I'm wondering if anyone has tried using epoxy resin to achieve similar results?

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  • Low Cost Wireless Sensor Network on 433MHz Band

    Be very careful if using any transmitters in the 433MHz band. Why? This radio spectrum is allocated for Amateur Radio use which requires a license in most/all countries. Details of the allocation in Europe can be found at: https://www.efis.dk/sitecontent.jsp?sitecontent=ecatableIn the U.S. the FCC website or another good source is ARRL.org. Allocations are often granted as shared with primary and secondary users. Such is the case in the U.S. with Amatuers sharing the space with radio location services. Specifically, amateurs (or "hams" as they are more commonly known) use this spectrum for satellite communication, voice and data transmission. The same may be true in other parts of the world, such as noted in the above URL.The fact that someone may obtain transmitters easily fr...

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    Be very careful if using any transmitters in the 433MHz band. Why? This radio spectrum is allocated for Amateur Radio use which requires a license in most/all countries. Details of the allocation in Europe can be found at: https://www.efis.dk/sitecontent.jsp?sitecontent=ecatableIn the U.S. the FCC website or another good source is ARRL.org. Allocations are often granted as shared with primary and secondary users. Such is the case in the U.S. with Amatuers sharing the space with radio location services. Specifically, amateurs (or "hams" as they are more commonly known) use this spectrum for satellite communication, voice and data transmission. The same may be true in other parts of the world, such as noted in the above URL.The fact that someone may obtain transmitters easily from sites like eBay or others does NOT grant any privileges to anyone to use the transmitters. Again, these may be shared radio spectrum so don't be upset if your project experiences interference from licensed users. In such cases it will be you who is out of luck. Aside from the humorous stories where a DIYer sets up a remote to control the lights in his backyard but also opens all of the garage doors in the neighborhood, there are incidents where (in the U.S.) the FCC steps in and slaps a $10,000 fine to the belligerent guy knowingly causing interference who refuses to back down. All I'm saying is that you need to be aware of the situation before hitting the power switch.

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  • goroberts56. commented on rhallett's instructable Turn MDF Into Marble 5 months ago
    Turn MDF Into Marble

    Awesome looking results! I've used two part epoxy infused with spray paint and powdered tints to achieve simulated stone.

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  • RFID NFC Tap and Go Ring for Credit Card Payment

    Wouldn't having an RFID device out in the open like this make it easier for nefarious scanners to collect your card info? That's why there's a plethora of RFID shielding products on the market. So why would anyone want to be swinging their credit card around in public? Also, when banks re-issue a replacement card, the old one is cancelled; you might be holding two cards but only one is active unless you requested two for the same account. Not the same thing. Now, if there was a [decorative] metallic cover for the ring that could be slid on/off or rotated on the ring to protect your data...

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  • goroberts56. commented on SidA2's instructable The Awesome Rainbow Tornado Lamp3 years ago
    The Awesome Rainbow Tornado Lamp

    Here's another thought. Since the air is inside the bottle/jar (and needed for the tornado effect) will warm and cool, pressure will increase/decrease which depending how this is built could result in some leakage. To help take some of that pressure, insert some small, thin-walled plastic balls inside. Before inserting them however, make a pin hole to equalize the pressure inside the ball to the pressure outside. Thin walled plastic is best because it will expand and contract to the air (in the bottle/jar) around it. Water will not compress so it's important these are air tight to stay afloat. Seal the holes in the balls with a glue gun dab, silicone or whatever as long as it isn't water soluble. Once everything is all sealed up, they will also bring some added visual effect to the...

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    Here's another thought. Since the air is inside the bottle/jar (and needed for the tornado effect) will warm and cool, pressure will increase/decrease which depending how this is built could result in some leakage. To help take some of that pressure, insert some small, thin-walled plastic balls inside. Before inserting them however, make a pin hole to equalize the pressure inside the ball to the pressure outside. Thin walled plastic is best because it will expand and contract to the air (in the bottle/jar) around it. Water will not compress so it's important these are air tight to stay afloat. Seal the holes in the balls with a glue gun dab, silicone or whatever as long as it isn't water soluble. Once everything is all sealed up, they will also bring some added visual effect to the tornado but unseen to the viewer be providing some equalization as well.Excellent build SidA2, great idea!

    To avoid any leaks at all, use a wider base that is also non-metalic where a longer cylindrical magnet can be left to move freely. Then underneath the base another cylindrical magnet is mounted on the mother and made to spin. The magnetic fields will couple the two magnets and will turn the inner magnet thus churning the water. I've seen this in lab equipment where the solution being stirred also developed a vortex. No leaks. Using this approach you could upgrade to a clear glass fixture found at many craft stores or even a large glass jar, just make sure to find an alternate to the metal lid which are often made of low grade steel (high iron content) which would interfere with the magnets and could rust over time. With a little "Instructable" ingenuity a wood or other t...

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    To avoid any leaks at all, use a wider base that is also non-metalic where a longer cylindrical magnet can be left to move freely. Then underneath the base another cylindrical magnet is mounted on the mother and made to spin. The magnetic fields will couple the two magnets and will turn the inner magnet thus churning the water. I've seen this in lab equipment where the solution being stirred also developed a vortex. No leaks. Using this approach you could upgrade to a clear glass fixture found at many craft stores or even a large glass jar, just make sure to find an alternate to the metal lid which are often made of low grade steel (high iron content) which would interfere with the magnets and could rust over time. With a little "Instructable" ingenuity a wood or other type of base material would make a nice addition to any decor. Just make the base heavy or wide so the lamp can't easily topple over.This is a great idea SidA2 has come up with. And, to make it even more possible, he's provided the code for the microcontroller to bring the lights to life. Excellent build!

    To avoid any leaks at all, use a wider base that is also non-metalic where a longer cylindrical magnet can be left to move freely. Then underneath the base another cylindrical magnet is mounted on the motor where it can spin. The magnetic fields will couple the two magnets and will turn the inner magnet thus churning the water. I've seen this in lab equipment where the solution being stirred also developed a vortex in a large flask or beaker. No leaks. Using this approach you could upgrade to a clear glass fixture found at many craft stores or even a large glass jar. Just make sure to find an alternate to the metal lid which are often made of low grade steel (high iron content) that would interfere with the magnets and could rust over time. With a little "Instructable" ingenu...

    see more »

    To avoid any leaks at all, use a wider base that is also non-metalic where a longer cylindrical magnet can be left to move freely. Then underneath the base another cylindrical magnet is mounted on the motor where it can spin. The magnetic fields will couple the two magnets and will turn the inner magnet thus churning the water. I've seen this in lab equipment where the solution being stirred also developed a vortex in a large flask or beaker. No leaks. Using this approach you could upgrade to a clear glass fixture found at many craft stores or even a large glass jar. Just make sure to find an alternate to the metal lid which are often made of low grade steel (high iron content) that would interfere with the magnets and could rust over time. With a little "Instructable" ingenuity a wood or other type of base material would make a nice addition to any decor. Just make the base heavy or wide so the lamp can't easily topple over.This is a great idea SidA2 has come up with. And, to make it even more possible, he's provided the code for the microcontroller to bring the lights to life.Excellent build!

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  • goroberts56. commented on mikeasaurus's instructable No-wrinkle Button Seam3 years ago
    No-wrinkle Button Seam

    You just saved several shirts in my closet that developed this problem. Thanks!

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