author
41CommentsPran Buri, Prachuap Khiri Khan, Thailand

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  • Arduino: Software Debouncing in Interrupt Function...

    I've seen software debouncing code that didn't use interrupts but used the main loop. It would only trigger some action if the state had changed, and then remained unchanged for a period of time. E.g. if 10 consecutive readings (one reading each millisecond) return the same (new) state, then do the action. I guess in some cases it could be good to do it this way, to prevent some spurious triggering (maybe due to some noise / glitch?), rather than do the action on first state change, then ignore further actions for a given time like your solution does. What do you think?Do you think it would be feasible to implement this approach using interrupts? I'm guessing part of the code would have to go in the main loop, don't see a way around it.

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  • Easy Build Heat Treat Furnace - No Power Tools Required.

    Nice and simple! I was a bit surprised to see the cordless drill when the title said "No Power Tools Required"

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  • Making a Replacement Axe or Hatchet Handle

    One important thing: a straight-grained piece of wood should be selected from the handle. Ideally, the piece should be split off a log, not sawn - the splitting will allow to prove the straightness of the grain (or to reject a piece as not ideal). The other thing is grain orientation, ideally the grain should run parallel to the axe head.If you go to buy a ready-made handle, you will notice the manufacturers don't care about either of these qualities. The grain often runs out significantly (which weakens the handle), and the grain orientation can vary from parallel (most desired) to perpendicular (least desired).I think if one puts effort into making their own handle, it's important to start with the most suitable material, and keep the grain in mind.In America, the best wood is hickory...

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    One important thing: a straight-grained piece of wood should be selected from the handle. Ideally, the piece should be split off a log, not sawn - the splitting will allow to prove the straightness of the grain (or to reject a piece as not ideal). The other thing is grain orientation, ideally the grain should run parallel to the axe head.If you go to buy a ready-made handle, you will notice the manufacturers don't care about either of these qualities. The grain often runs out significantly (which weakens the handle), and the grain orientation can vary from parallel (most desired) to perpendicular (least desired).I think if one puts effort into making their own handle, it's important to start with the most suitable material, and keep the grain in mind.In America, the best wood is hickory (sapwood, not heartwood, is used for handles), in Europe it is ash (unless you can get some hickory!). There are suitable woods as well. If you're making a carving axe or a hewing hatchet, the handle will take much less stressed than with a splitting or a felling axe.

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  • REPAIR: Chinese Spindle 0.8kW Fried Connector

    Perhaps that was meant just as an FYI? 240 VAC 16A rating is more than enough for your spindle. Although it would be nice to have a locking feature, the same connectors are available in a locking version if you search for IEC C13/C14 locking connector.Originally these spindles use a sort of connector which can usually be found using keywords aircraft connector. They (or similar) looking connectors are easily found on eBay (search for e.g. GX16 or GX20 connectors), but I couldn't find an official standard for these. They are available in various number of pins, if you use a 4 pin one you could probably pass the grounding wire inside and make a neater wiring.

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  • gpavlovsky commented on Mikhandmaker.'s instructable Router Plane
    Router Plane

    If you search ebay.co.uk for "plough plane irons set", you will see that vintage plough plane irons have the same shank width (so that you can use any of them in a single plough plane!). Those vintage irons were numbered from 1 to 8, the available cutting widths are around 3 mm to 15 mm (1/8" to 5/8").Another design of a router plane uses a homemade iron (blade) made from a hex wrench (allen key). These would need a separate body for each size of blade.

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