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gremdel

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  • The PIN defines look correct to me.I think you do need to change all the LED defines (for example "#define LED_A (25)" ) to line up with the order of your signal wire. If it's like Akin's original wiring, it's LED_A to (0), LED_B to (1), and so on.I had trouble with the switch so I do have some debugging stuff in the code:Serial.print(digitalRead(PIN_SWITCH));So if you listen on the serial port while it's running you'll get some debug info.

    If you post the code (pastie.org works well) and some pictures of how you wired it, I'm happy to help.

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  • Are you using the first or second example of code I posted? Either way, did you modify the #defines to match the order of the signal wire?

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  • Here's some pics. I also changed the code to match light colors, add some flickering lights, and get brighter sequence: http://pastie.org/10948254I'm not 100% pleased with the lettering. The lettering in the show is creepier with dripping paint but since it's on fabric it didn't drip and I didn't want to make it worse by trying to force it.It's going into the window tonight!

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  • > but sadly can't have a variable have two values such as 'uint32_t a = strip.n(0), strip.Color(255, 0, 255);'No, but one thing I considered was an array of color choices, where I would set it up like this:uint32_t colorChoices[] = {strip.Color(255,0,0), strip.Color(0,255,0), ...}Then I could just call colorChoices[LED_S] or whatever to get the color. I ended up using the function because it was easier to read.> Why do you define the letters at the beginning?That's a function of how I have things wired up in the back. I tried to keep wires as short as possible so instead of going from A to Z, I go from Z to R, I to Q, and H to A. So calling character - 'A' wouldn't work.For efficiency, if/then vs. switch really isn't much different (the compiler ends up with the same assembly code m…

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    > but sadly can't have a variable have two values such as 'uint32_t a = strip.n(0), strip.Color(255, 0, 255);'No, but one thing I considered was an array of color choices, where I would set it up like this:uint32_t colorChoices[] = {strip.Color(255,0,0), strip.Color(0,255,0), ...}Then I could just call colorChoices[LED_S] or whatever to get the color. I ended up using the function because it was easier to read.> Why do you define the letters at the beginning?That's a function of how I have things wired up in the back. I tried to keep wires as short as possible so instead of going from A to Z, I go from Z to R, I to Q, and H to A. So calling character - 'A' wouldn't work.For efficiency, if/then vs. switch really isn't much different (the compiler ends up with the same assembly code more or less) but I think switch is easier to read.

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  • I'm real close to finishing this off (I just need to paint the letters onto the board). I'll post some pictures once I do. A couple of changes I made:* I used foam board and a drill to cut the holes. While a CNCed board would have been better, this was much easier.* Costco had some christmas strings for $10 which I scrapped for parts. I used my soldering iron to cut the plastic bulbs in half and glued them to a piece of fabric I stretched over the foam board.* I cleaned up the code a little bit. You can modify it to host any number of phrases and you switch phrases by holding down a button between phrases: http://pastie.org/10944478Thanks for your help with this project and I hope my notes can be of help to someone!

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