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  • headstack commented on F4916's instructable How to Desalinate Seawater1 year ago
    How to Desalinate Seawater

    Amoebic bodies like Giardia, and Crypto will be left behind as they are to heavy to be lifted in vapor.

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  • headstack commented on sketchglass's instructable Restoring Old Kitchen Knives3 years ago
    Restoring Old Kitchen Knives

    Great instructable!It might be worth mentioning that not all plastic handled cuttlery is of poor quality.The old carbon Sabattier have plastic handles and are really fine knives, as are many of Wusthoff's professional knives, and Henkels as well...If we are lucky enough to find such quality cast aside.When dealing with really grimy, wooden handles crusted in old grease and food particles, a pot of simmering TSP (Tri Sodium Phosphate), a soft bronze wire brush.Thank you for the citric acid info, I'll be giving that a go in lieu of wet sanding with 1,500 to freshen up some of the old knives.Wishing everyone a great season!

    Great instructable!It might be worth mentioning that not all plastic handled cuttlery is of poor quality.The old carbon Sabattier have plastic handles and are really fine knives, as are many of Wusthoff's professional knives, and Henkels as well...If we are lucky enough to find such quality cast aside.When dealing with really grimy, wooden handles crusted in old grease and food particles, a pot of simmering TSP (Tri Sodium Phosphate), a soft bronze wire brush and a pair of gloves and goggles can come in rather handy.Dip the offending part in the solution for a minute to warm and soften the crud, then stroke with the grain, away from your self as much as possible.Another durable finish that can be useful is Birchwood Casey, Tru Oil.While this is not "Food Safe", once cured it i...

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    Great instructable!It might be worth mentioning that not all plastic handled cuttlery is of poor quality.The old carbon Sabattier have plastic handles and are really fine knives, as are many of Wusthoff's professional knives, and Henkels as well...If we are lucky enough to find such quality cast aside.When dealing with really grimy, wooden handles crusted in old grease and food particles, a pot of simmering TSP (Tri Sodium Phosphate), a soft bronze wire brush and a pair of gloves and goggles can come in rather handy.Dip the offending part in the solution for a minute to warm and soften the crud, then stroke with the grain, away from your self as much as possible.Another durable finish that can be useful is Birchwood Casey, Tru Oil.While this is not "Food Safe", once cured it is not coming off the handle and we hopefully don't put pieces of knife scales into the product.Thank you for the citric acid info, I'll be giving that a go in lieu of wet sanding with 1,500 to freshen up some of the old knives.Wishing everyone a great season!

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  • headstack commented on LeDesordre's instructable Cold Brew Coffee3 years ago
    Cold Brew Coffee

    You mention "1.5gallons" "I prepare it one morning and finish it the next morning"When reading along quickly without taking the time to decipher the whole story, it did almost sound as if you drank a pitcher per day.This sounded a bit heavy duty day in day out, so I read it over a few times.That said, on a hot day I probably have gone through most of a gallon of cold brew over ice.It tastes good and goes down a little too easy :-DWhen doing a small batch, I'll put the grounds in a French Press with the plunger just holding the coffee under water.Come morning, just slowly push everything to the bottom of the beaker and your coffee is ready to drink.

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  • headstack commented on Scotttland's instructable Repairing Split Wood3 years ago
    Repairing Split Wood

    If you are hot gluing a patch over the through holes and getting "weep" it most likely means the patch does not have a perfect seal against an undulating/striated surface.Using something with better sealing capabilities like Phenoseal should work.I learned to use it as a "dam" around the top edges of cracks, so you can overfill and fair the filler down to grade after curing.Squirt a healthy bead well outside the perimiter of the hole, slap your patch in place, plastic wrap and then a slice of Masonite works well, and jam that sucker tightly in place to create a liquid tight seal.you'll want to make sure the caulk stays out of the hole so as not to blob up into the repair.Have fun!

    Paul,I don't see your reply here, but Phenoseal has some interesting properties.It's quite soft and therefore finds its way into fairly complex surface textures making a good seal, yet after it has cured a bit is still very pliable and pares away from the wood with even a moderately sharp chisel.I would steer away from products containing any Silicones as these will wreak havoc with finishing processes. Other than Silicone causing fisheye hell, anything that seems to form a good seal and is viscous not to run or flatten out could be worth a try.Mashed potato flakes, here we come! :-D

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